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Old 09-21-2014, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
37,092 posts, read 45,594,679 times
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We moved from Ohio for several reasons. My husband was a sales rep for the southeast, so we could live anywhere, but moving south saved him travel time, and our youngest son was a soldier in Savannah.
Circumstances have changed. We are retired, and our son no longer lives here, but we still wouldn't go back. We just returned from visiting family, and it was chilly and cloudy. We love the lushness of Ohio in the summer, but we were so glad to be back to the constant sunshine in GA.
We lived in the country in Ohio, near Akron and Cleveland, but we were rural. After our last kid was out of school, there was never anything to do. Here, there is something to do every weekend and we're also near the beach. It's no contest. Also, the politics are much funnier.
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Old 09-21-2014, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Warren, OH
2,748 posts, read 3,336,717 times
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Not all of North Eastern Ohio is in the "Snow Belt" or is subject to "The Lake Effect.

We moved to Ohio from Northern PA. The weather was miserable there and the Summers, because we were in a valley were hot as Hades.
Summer is mild here and evenings are cool. We enjoy night time bonfires with friends on the patio. We use the A/C only a few times each Summer. In PA, it was on 24/7.

Autumn is an especially nice and protracted season here in Ohio. It's a great time to get to know our beautiful state.
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Old 01-19-2015, 10:05 PM
 
7,899 posts, read 5,028,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane0218 View Post
... I've already checked Xenia, and it seems to be reminiscent of where I grew up. Just the basics, and if I want more, I jump over to another, larger town.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
Xenia's a nice town, but the downside is the crazy weather, which includes the occasional tornado or freak hail storm which don't seem to happen in any of the surrounding areas.
Interesting thread, especially the comments about Xenia. I live in a rural local quite some distance from Xenia-proper, but it has the Xenia zip code. Xenia itself is a declining town with a decided blue-collar bent. Rural/exurban areas surrounding Xenia are however quite affluent, by local standards. Xenia-city tends to be self-contained, with locals rarely venturing far. The outlying areas are in some cases bedroom-communities for people who work at Wright-Patterson AFB. Wright-Patt is the main local engine of growth and economic vitality.

Weather: Xenia indeed has a history of tornadoes, but they are localized to a narrow "alley". More importantly, the whole region from Indianapolis to Wheeling, Northern KY to Toledo, has a harshly continental climate. This means hot and muggy summers, cold and windy winters, short and wet spring/fall. Yes, there are four seasons, but two of them are very brief. Winter on average is not much colder than eastern Pennsylvania, but keep in mind that the US East Coast has the ocean on its east, and a mountain range on its west. This exerts a moderating influence. In the Midwest we have no protection from Canadian winter-systems convecting south. This means that average winter lows might be OK, but there are periods of brutally harsh cold-snaps (below zero deg F).

Economy: the "Miami Valley" of SW Ohio has been devastated by the collapse of the US manufacturing sector, particularly the auto industry. Some parts of the Midwest, such as Detroit or Youngstown, are doing worse. So the Miami Valley is moderately OK, in relative terms. But it's far more moribund and struggling than along the US East Coast. Is the OP retired? If not, consider the local job prospects… with skepticism.

Cost of living: housing is very cheap, sales taxes are moderate. Comments on property-taxes vary widely. State and local income tax can be factor, depending on one's income. They're much more reasonable than say in California or New York, but I heard that PA's taxes are much lower.

Culture: Cleveland-Columbus-Cincinnati have reasonable offerings. Columbus especially is reputed for growth and a smattering of vibrancy. Outside of those three metro areas, Ohio resembles central PA.

Overall I can not recommend local relocation for a couple without children (as evidently describes the OP). The area is quite justly extolled for being "a good place to raise a family". Those without a "family" may find themselves marginalized in the local culture.
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Old 01-28-2016, 03:05 PM
 
1,470 posts, read 1,298,367 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane0218 View Post
A) If you've left Ohio, where did you leave from, why, and was it a good decision?
Left from the Columbus area for college. Since I had an usual major (originally) I really only had two options LA or Pittsburgh and California seemed too far away and too expensive. Pittsburgh ended up being a good choice even across those years where it wasn't viewed as a desirable city live in like it is today.

Also spent more time in Cleveland than I can count.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane0218 View Post
B) If you've moved to Ohio, where did you move from, why, and are you happy where you are? Would you move to another area of Ohio, or want to leave the state?
[/b]
Ended up living in the city of Columbus itself a few times. The first time I didn't care for it since I was coming from Pittsburgh (after having lived on South Beach as well). I preferred the compact, historic, and walkable nature of Pittsburgh and Columbus just wasn't that. It was more modern, bland, sprawling, car centered, parking lots, and overwhelmingly focused on OSU and the football team. Filled with stereotypical types and aggressive frat types. Not to mention I had figured out the best ways to avoid crime in Pittsburgh and I wasn't particularly interested in figuring out a new system/type of criminal in Ohio.

Also crime was more sporadically spread throughout Columbus than it was in Pittsburgh. There the bad areas can be mostly avoided and the only real issue was muggers and drunks.

Anyway, I lived in the German Village the first time around.

It wasn't until later that I came to see how nice Columbus was not really because it was such a great place, but because so many other places are worse.

Other times I left Columbus it was to head to Portland (twice & returned twice), another time Charlotte, and another to go back to Pittsburgh. Lived in the southern part of the city before coming to Asheville as well.

It's a nice low-cost place that has a good economy and can work for a lot of people, but it's also middle of the road in a lot of areas too.

All said I'd place it in my top 10, but somewhere near the bottom.

Never really liked Cleveland outside of enjoying the cultural amenities whenever I was in town. Disliked the idea of lake effect snow, the "lovable loser" thing the people have going on, the odd layout, and while it has some very nice suburbs I'm not a burbs sort person so I never viewed it as somewhere I'd want to live.

Not real familiar with Toledo. Went to the zoo there, but I can't remember much of anything else. Familiar with Sandusky & Bowling Green though. Familiar with Cincinnati somewhat, but never lived there. Almost took a job there once, but ended up not taking it. Have a friend that still lives there and another friend's relatives. Too conservative, too split between the haves and have nots, and something about a number of the people I met from there just rubbed me the wrong way.

Another thing Ohio is known for is people from Ohio who never leave Ohio.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane0218 View Post
Except for here in NE PA, all places were populated, and only in NY did we feel comfortable enough to speak our minds without people either getting hyper-defensive (when what was said wasn't confrontational), or becoming afraid to say anything, or giving us the southern charm and bypassing/ignoring what was said. We're normal people, liberal-minded but not fanatics, not religious.
Columbus people are "normal" people, but might be a bit too boring or lacking in culture for your tastes. People will speak their mind, but it's usually in a way in which they stuck their foot in their mouth and not in an intelligent conversational way.

If it's one thing about the south that I absolutely loath as a free thinking person it's the superficial southern charm and the bypassing/ignoring what was said thing. Plus this area has both fanatics (on both ends of the spectrum) and a whole lot of cheerleaders. But that's another discussion for another time.
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Old 01-29-2016, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Tampa
437 posts, read 494,588 times
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I left from the Cleveland area in December of 2013 with a job opportunity in Tampa, FL and never looked back. I left family, friends and a good job to get out of the boring, cold, gloomy and just overall depressing life that i was living in Ohio. When i came down to Florida it has been everything i wanted and then some. The opportunities that have been given to me since moving here are a blessing and i wouldn't have it any other way.

I knew that i was done with Ohio after living my whole life (30 years) there and just being fed up with everything going on, but more so the weather and constant cold and gloominess of the winters were giving me severe SAD and anxiety.

Now, living in the sunshine state i no longer suffer with these problems, and while the humidity can be overbearing at times, it's no worse than dealing with the cold sub zero temps of the winter in Ohio and having to be couped up in the house for 6-7 months. Some people enjoy their 4 seasons which we really don't get much of in Florida, but really there isn't much of a Fall and Spring in Ohio anymore as Fall seems to only last about a month before the cold really kicks in, and by the time Winter ends in late March/April, there really isn't much of a Spring to enjoy.

For me, the hardest thing about leaving Ohio was leaving my family, specifically my parents. But now, they have a place to vacation to in Florida during those cold Winter months, as my saying to them and my friends up north is "your vacation is my home", since i constantly feel i'm on a vacation here
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Old 01-29-2016, 12:04 PM
 
Location: The analog world
17,086 posts, read 9,856,223 times
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Why and when did you leave?

We left southwestern Ohio nearly twenty years as we were entering our thirties for a job offer. We landed in California. Was it a good decision? Unequivocally, yes! We are much better off financially for having taken the leap, although it was very hard to leave my hometown. I still have a soft spot in my heart for Ohio, but I could not move back permanently. Our lives are elsewhere now.
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Old 01-29-2016, 02:47 PM
 
7,906 posts, read 4,866,693 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beacher23 View Post
really there isn't much of a Fall and Spring in Ohio anymore as Fall seems to only last about a month before the cold really kicks in, and by the time Winter ends in late March/April, there really isn't much of a Spring to enjoy.
My perception is that summer now extends into September and that autumns are longer than ever, even with later fall colors. In my neighborhood, some red maples don't shed their leaves until the second week of November.

I think springs are shorter, and maple syrup seasons are more difficult with fewer freezing nights.

It would be great to see an empirical analysis of the change in springs and autumns in northeast Ohio in recent decades.

One relevant observation concerns Halloween.

In the second half of the 20th century, it wasn't uncommon to have snow at Halloween. This now would be deemed very unusual. A couple years ago we did have some major snow in the last two weeks of November, but now more typically, we don't have significant snowfalls now until very late December.

Northeast Ohio likely will experience record low snowfalls this winter. I don't think total accumulated snowfall at Cleveland Hopkins has yet reached 10 inches. This reportedly is due to a record El Nino, but the El Nino reportedly now has ended.

Here's the accuweather.com long range forecast for February.

http://www.accuweather.com/en/us/pai...monyr=2/1/2016

Winter admittedly doesn't bother me, but that forecast doesn't haven't anything too bad IMO despite the fact that Lake Erie largely is not frozen making lake effect snow still possible. Many snowfalls in that forecast are with temperatures above freezing, which doesn't suggest heavy accumulations. It's easier to ignore snow if it will melt in a few days.

My genetic history is largely northern European. I wonder if this makes a difference in one's attitude and physical and psychological tolerance of winters.

Last edited by WRnative; 01-29-2016 at 02:59 PM..
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Old 01-29-2016, 08:16 PM
 
7,899 posts, read 5,028,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WRnative View Post
...
My genetic history is largely northern European. I wonder if this makes a difference in one's attitude and physical and psychological tolerance of winters.
I'm an immigrant from the North-East "corner" of Europe, and remember in my childhood winters occasionally hitting -40 (it's the same in deg-C or deg-F). But then, before arriving in Ohio, I spent some years on the US East Coast, and later in Los Angeles. That completely ruined my tolerance for cold weather, and for that matter, for any extremes - cold or hot.

So it's really more a matter of perspective and expectations. I find the occasional "polar" excursions into my part of Ohio - the Southwest - to be downright unbearable. I likewise can't stand the 90+ temperatures that are so frequent in summer.
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Old 01-29-2016, 09:22 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,932,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
I'm an immigrant from the North-East "corner" of Europe, and remember in my childhood winters occasionally hitting -40 (it's the same in deg-C or deg-F). But then, before arriving in Ohio, I spent some years on the US East Coast, and later in Los Angeles. That completely ruined my tolerance for cold weather, and for that matter, for any extremes - cold or hot.

So it's really more a matter of perspective and expectations. I find the occasional "polar" excursions into my part of Ohio - the Southwest - to be downright unbearable. I likewise can't stand the 90+ temperatures that are so frequent in summer.
I have 100% northern European ancestry and feel right in my element in the Northwoods of WI, MI, or MN. The country that it seems to be best matched for climate and landscape is Finland.
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Old 01-31-2016, 06:53 AM
 
5,550 posts, read 6,976,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Port Pitt Ash View Post
Familiar with Cincinnati somewhat, but never lived there. Almost took a job there once, but ended up not taking it. Have a friend that still lives there and another friend's relatives. Too conservative, too split between the haves and have nots, ends of the spectrum)


I do not get the haves and haves not comment. I find Cincinnati to be more homogeneous than other big cities.
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