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Old 01-16-2020, 05:49 PM
 
17 posts, read 8,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Well, exactly. Imagine the plight of a person who was born in Los Angeles, who went to school at UCLA or whatever, who got a job at Boeing in Huntington Beach. And then Boeing transfers this person to the field-office somewhere in Ohio. How would that feel?



I'd opine that what makes a place interesting (as in, not-boring) isn't the amusement parks, the hiking trails or even the symphony/ballet/museums... rather, it is the people with whom one has the privilege to associate. Let me give two specific examples.

The first is for people of "ethnic" background. Generations ago, our nearest city (Dayton) had a strong presence of Eastern Europeans. This has almost entirely dissipated. So, suppose that you're Hungarian... as in, born and raised in Hungary. Until age 25 or whatever, your world was Budapest. Maybe Vienna. 100 years ago, moving to Dayton would have made sense, in terms of like-minded community. But today? If you want to engage in heated arguments in your native language in the city-park, to host tea-parties in your native language, and so forth, you'd struggle in finding compatriots in Dayton. Chances are much better in NYC or LA.

The second is for people with particular hobbies not normally associated with the Heartland, such as chess. To its credit, Dayton has a decent (if small) chess club. But again, it's nothing like NYC.

In both cases, the key challenge is finding the "right" people, with whom to form close and regular association. This is harder to do in a smaller metro area, and is hard anywhere in the Midwest, with the notable exception of Chicago.
I'd opine that what makes a place interesting (as in, not-boring) isn't the amusement parks, the hiking trails or even the symphony/ballet/museums... rather, it is the people with whom one has the privilege to associate. Let me give two specific examples. nailed it!
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Old 03-01-2020, 12:46 PM
 
482 posts, read 242,163 times
Reputation: 1310
Great! So when will y'all quit moving to South Carolina?
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Old 03-04-2020, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
1,565 posts, read 874,517 times
Reputation: 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnathon Hills View Post
Great! So when will y'all quit moving to South Carolina?
Care to elaborate?
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Old 03-10-2020, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Destination: Youngstown (soon)
383 posts, read 931,753 times
Reputation: 226
The grass is definitely not greener in Ohio. Visit Conneaut, Ashtabula, Youngstown, Dayton, Mansfield, Portsmouth, or Steubenville and you'll see why.

Outside of the state's three largest cities, there's really nothing great about Ohio. Except that it's not Michigan.
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Old 03-10-2020, 04:59 PM
 
9,587 posts, read 6,328,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badguykc View Post
The grass is definitely not greener in Ohio. Visit Conneaut, Ashtabula, Youngstown, Dayton, Mansfield, Portsmouth, or Steubenville and you'll see why.

Outside of the state's three largest cities, there's really nothing great about Ohio. Except that it's not Michigan.

Rubbish.


See Mohican Region and Ohio Amish Country here, as well as other attractions in northeast Ohio.


https://www.tripadvisor.com/Travel-g...Day.Trips.html


https://www.tripadvisor.com/Travel-g...h.Country.html



https://www.tripadvisor.com/Travel-g...The.World.html



Have you ever been to Hocking Hills or seen "Tecumseh!" on nearby Sugarloaf Mountain?


https://www.fodors.com/news/outdoors...st-state-parks


Have you ever been to The Wilds, Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Wayne National Forest or AEP ReCreation Land?


https://thewilds.columbuszoo.org/


Have you ever visited Holden Arboretum, one of the best in the U.S.?


https://www.holdenarb.org/visit/cano...mergent-tower/



Even Ashtabula County is famous for its covered bridges.


Ashtabula County Covered Bridge Festival


And Lake Erie is the most fecund of the Great Lakes and dotted with interesting port villages, islands, and beaches.



https://sites.google.com/site/vermil...visitors-guide


https://putinbay.com/
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Old 03-15-2020, 09:14 AM
 
2,424 posts, read 963,759 times
Reputation: 2402
Quote:
Originally Posted by badguykc View Post
The grass is definitely not greener in Ohio. Visit Conneaut, Ashtabula, Youngstown, Dayton, Mansfield, Portsmouth, or Steubenville and you'll see why.

Outside of the state's three largest cities, there's really nothing great about Ohio. Except that it's not Michigan.
Dayton certainly has serious issues, but in all fairness it actually has one of the best hiking/bike trail networks in the country as well as an excellent park system. And there is a building boom underway downtown.
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Old 03-15-2020, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
13,388 posts, read 11,669,155 times
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Dayton's having quite the renaissance lately, and Michigan is a fine state. NWPA, however, has absolutely nothing outside of a national forest.
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Old 03-15-2020, 04:53 PM
 
9,587 posts, read 6,328,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
Dayton's having quite the renaissance lately, and Michigan is a fine state. NWPA, however, has absolutely nothing outside of a national forest.
NWPA = northwest PA???

Erie is a very charming lakefront community. It features Presque Isle, a great state park with the best U.S. surf beaches on Lake Erie. Waldameer at Presque Isle's entrance is one of the nation's last trolley amusement parks (no admission charge).

https://www.visiterie.com/

https://www.goerie.com/presque-isle

Erie is a significant summer tourist destination, especially from the Pittsburgh area.

And Allegheny National Forest is fantastic!

https://visitanf.com/mobile-home/
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Old 03-15-2020, 05:08 PM
 
9,587 posts, read 6,328,790 times
Reputation: 5522
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Well, exactly. Imagine the plight of a person who was born in Los Angeles, who went to school at UCLA or whatever, who got a job at Boeing in Huntington Beach. And then Boeing transfers this person to the field-office somewhere in Ohio. How would that feel?
Given the much lower housing prices and cost of living, and the much reduced traffic congestion, the Boeing transfer would feel much, much wealthier, even without a raise. And the Boeing transfer might have much shorter commute times and much more free time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
I'd opine that what makes a place interesting (as in, not-boring) isn't the amusement parks, the hiking trails or even the symphony/ballet/museums... rather, it is the people with whom one has the privilege to associate. Let me give two specific examples.

The first is for people of "ethnic" background. Generations ago, our nearest city (Dayton) had a strong presence of Eastern Europeans. This has almost entirely dissipated. So, suppose that you're Hungarian... as in, born and raised in Hungary. Until age 25 or whatever, your world was Budapest. Maybe Vienna. 100 years ago, moving to Dayton would have made sense, in terms of like-minded community. But today? If you want to engage in heated arguments in your native language in the city-park, to host tea-parties in your native language, and so forth, you'd struggle in finding compatriots in Dayton. Chances are much better in NYC or LA.

The second is for people with particular hobbies not normally associated with the Heartland, such as chess. To its credit, Dayton has a decent (if small) chess club. But again, it's nothing like NYC.

In both cases, the key challenge is finding the "right" people, with whom to form close and regular association. This is harder to do in a smaller metro area, and is hard anywhere in the Midwest, with the notable exception of Chicago.
I suspect there are many Hungarian speakers in Cleveland. Cleveland State University even has a Hungarian Studies Program.

https://class.csuohio.edu/world-lang...garian-studies

Hungarians in Cleveland | Cleveland Hungarians

https://case.edu/ech/articles/h/hungarians

https://clevelandhungarianmuseum.org...ograms-museum/

The Balaton (named after Lake Balaton) on Shaker Square likely is the best Hungarian restaurant in Ohio and there certainly are Hungarian speakers working there.

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaura...land_Ohio.html

Northeast Ohio has several chess clubs.

https://ohchess.org/Clubs.html

https://www.cleveland.com/business/2...n_chess_m.html

Cleveland Public Library has a renown chess collection.

<<Much like the library itself, the Special Collections on the third floor offers intriguing treasures. One standout is The John G. White Collection of Chess – the largest library collection of chess sets and chess-related materials in the world.>>

https://www.freshwatercleveland.com/...cpl092415.aspx

I doubt if most chess players from California would feel isolated in northeast Ohio.

Last edited by WRnative; 03-15-2020 at 05:29 PM..
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