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Old 01-23-2009, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Cortland, Ohio
3,170 posts, read 6,674,263 times
Reputation: 1320

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JR_C,

I love the house on the Northside. I guess you would have to ask yourself if you want to put a bunch of money into this house. Next, if you aren't living in it, wouldn't you be afraid someone might break in and steal the improvements you've made??? I've always said if i won the lottery i would fix up nice old homes in Warren and sell them, even for a loss, just to save them. Oh yeah, and think about the heating bills you would have, just a few thoughts........
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Old 01-23-2009, 04:18 PM
 
69 posts, read 130,205 times
Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by CortlandGirl79 View Post
KenD,

I think it's great that you have four other families looking into the area. Where are all of you moving from??? I hope that you all end up happy and in safe, nice neighborhoods. BTW, if you are looking in Trumbull Co. i can recommend you great agent who works for Coldwell Banker. Not only did she spend a lot of time helping me find a house in Niles (i was looking in the 60k to 90k price range), but she also sold my house for me when i had to get out of it. One of the best things she taught me was to price the house right. Many people will ask $10k + than they actually want for the house. What happens when you do this is exclude people that really can afford your house from looking at it, not only that, but when you ask too much it takes much longer to sell. Oh yeah, and the best advice ever is, your 1st offer is usually your best. I've found both of these to be beyond true! Good luck finding your next home.

Cort
CortlandGirl79,

Again, if you're buying or selling a home in the $50K range, the 6% commission is real money to a broker, especially if you look at the cost that can be involved in selling a house. In the $10K range, 6% is (quite literally) nothing to pay someone to take a few hours, drive around, pay for gasoline, and whatever other incidental expenses that rack up along the way.

Please don't misunderstand me, I know that this is an issue for them, I also know that in Youngstown's case, it is adding to the problems.

Right now, we've been living in western Maryland fr the last almost four years, but we're not originally from this area. We do like it here, have managed to settle in but there isn't all if the variety I know a city like Youngstown can provide.

The other three families I have interested are from the Virginia/DC area. One is an older couple, semi retired, that are a business partner of mine. As of next month he is going to be getting Social Security and is looking to spend less. I showed him a beautiful house today, asking $35K, and he added it to his list of places to visit tomorrow. The other two families were attracted by the idea of buying a house outright as opposed to paying through the nose for basically the same lifestyle.

We'll see.
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Old 01-23-2009, 06:09 PM
 
69 posts, read 130,205 times
Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
This is only semi-related to the current train of conversation, but I'm agonizing over a house on the north side that just came up for sale.
This house:
Listings Search: Eaton Group, Inc. GMAC Real Estate

But, then I ran across the listing I linked to above. I'm sure this house needs a huge amount of work. On the vacant properties survey, it was given an "F" because there is a hole in the roof. (among other things, I'm sure.) So, if no one else shows interest in this house soon, I fear that it will be demolished. The house I am interested in, in my neighborhood, is in OK shape--I think it's a "B." So, I'm not so worried about it's fate without my help. And, it's not as interesting architecturally. (though it's still a brick house, and I love brick houses)
Funny, my wife showed me that house today but we were afraid that it's location made it out of where we would feel comfortable living. Can you give me an idea where on the north side is safe to live? We were under the impression that anywhere up there was best left alone.

The other side of this discussion is that it doesn't make financial sense to sink $35K into a house that won't be able to sell for more than $25K when you're done. Better on future appreciation is what caused this housing collapse.

The first rule of homebuying should be that one never buys a house that they fall in love with - unless the numbers work. As sad as this is for me to say and you to read, that house is headed from the wrecking ball, along with a good number of other homes that are also quite beautiful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
I had been planning on buying a certain house in my current neighborhood to fix up and... eventually... sell. (No rush. Buy cheap, make improvements slowly, and sell when the market stabilizes.) The house is currently in foreclosure, so it's only a matter of time before it hits the market. Here is a picture I took last summer.
I'm going to echo CortlandGirl79's comment and wonder how you would keep the house secure, if you aren't living in it.

Personally, I don't see the attraction of the green house, it looks "average" to me - but don't go by my tastes. I can tell you that I have seen some exquisite homes for sale in Youngstown and certainly unmatchable anywhere on a dollar by dollar basis.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
I'm tired of seeing these great old houses fall down, and I think I'd like to do something about it. But, I'm not sure I can handle the work. (that's why I'm agonizing about what to do)
Unless the homes you are considering are historically relevant or an architectural gem. I think you are going to find yourself pretty much on your own, I'm sorry to say. If you have a lot of nerve, and you don't mind playing real estate tycoon (for real) there are funding mechanisms that you can tap into that would bring these homes back to rental code and probably (if you are careful) give you a positive cash flow.

For example, the FHA offers what they call the Streamlined 203K loan which allows you to borrow up to $35K for repairs - and if that house is rated an "F" the owner would be smart to give it to you for a dollar. If you are unfamiliar with the Streamlined 203K program, you can read more about it here.

Let's take a look at how that might work from there on down.

$35K mortgage @ 6% over $15 years - $295.35/month (30 years is $209.84)
Insurance and taxes (assuming you can get the county to value your house are a real rate) would probably add another $100/month.

All total, you would have a completely redone home that could rent for $450 to $600 (I'm guessing, based on what I can see for rental homes in the area) leaving you with a little money left over every month.

Considering that there are hard working construction people you can hire for a reasonable rate, (this makes you the general contractor) my guess is that you could do this home for well under $35K. If you completed and rented one of these homes every month you would build up quite a portfolio in a short period of time.

I would be glad to give you a hand with this, once I move to Youngstown - which may be in the next 30 days if everything falls into place.

Keep your fingers crossed for me please, I might be letting you all know what's up after some papers get signed on the first of the month or thereabouts.
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Old 01-23-2009, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
3,262 posts, read 4,142,914 times
Reputation: 2033
Quote:
Originally Posted by CortlandGirl79 View Post
JR_C,

I love the house on the Northside. I guess you would have to ask yourself if you want to put a bunch of money into this house. Next, if you aren't living in it, wouldn't you be afraid someone might break in and steal the improvements you've made??? I've always said if i won the lottery i would fix up nice old homes in Warren and sell them, even for a loss, just to save them. Oh yeah, and think about the heating bills you would have, just a few thoughts........
Thanks!

I might want to live in the house eventually. It depends on whether or not I like the neighborhood. I'm most concerned about how accessible a grocery store would be.(at least a place where I can get milk) I don't think theft would be as much of an issue because the value of scrap has dropped recently. (so I've been told) Also, I'd probably use PEX, instead of copper. (then I wouldn't have to learn how to sweat joints) I don't want to lose money on this, but I wouldn't mind breaking even. And, if I could get the house cheap enoough, I don't think that would be a problem.

Thanks for your insight, KenD.

Quote:
Funny, my wife showed me that house today but we were afraid that it's location made it out of where we would feel comfortable living. Can you give me an idea where on the north side is safe to live? We were under the impression that anywhere up there was best left alone.
As a single guy, I think my tolerance for "safe" is higher than yours. But, I think Fifth Ave., Crandall Park, and--to a somewhat lesser extent--Wick Park are stabilizing influences on that side of the city. So, I'd probably stay west of Elm St. and east of Belmont Ave. And, I think the neighborhoods get more stable as you head north on Fifth Ave. But, I'm not familiar enough with the area to consider my advice sound.

As someone in their early 30's who is growing old too soon, an aspect of the north side that I like is that it is the most "bohemian" part of the city. There are lots more college students and young professionals on the north side. The west side is more family oriented/blue collar.

Quote:
The other side of this discussion is that it doesn't make financial sense to sink $35K into a house that won't be able to sell for more than $25K when you're done. Better on future appreciation is what caused this housing collapse.
Check out this page detailing recent home sales in the area:
http://www.city-data.com/real-estate...-OH-44504.html

I don't expect to get $80k-90k for the house.(as you can see from the link, houses in the same neighborhood were selling in that range in the spring/summer of '08) But, if I do it right, I think I could get $50k.

Quote:
As sad as this is for me to say and you to read, that house is headed from the wrecking ball, along with a good number of other homes that are also quite beautiful.
I realize that I'm being too emotional about this. I'm thinking about this house like some people think about cats and dogs in the local humane society. (They can't save them all, but they could save one.) And, unlike animals who reproduce, these houses are a non-renewable resource--when they're gone, they're gone forever.

Quote:
Personally, I don't see the attraction of the green house, it looks "average" to me
It is fairly average. It's a medium quality, brick American Foursquare. I like its simplicity. To me, it gets a lot of points for being both brick and Foursquare.

Quote:
Unless the homes you are considering are historically relevant or an architectural gem.
While the house may not be historic, I think its architecture and quality make it worth saving.

Here are some other houses that are in the same circumstances, (and same zip code) and I wouldn't be as upset if they met with the wrecking ball.
Listings Search: Eaton Group, Inc. GMAC Real Estate
Listings Search: Eaton Group, Inc. GMAC Real Estate
Or even...
Listings Search: Eaton Group, Inc. GMAC Real Estate

Quote:
For example, the FHA offers what they call the Streamlined 203K loan which allows you to borrow up to $35K for repairs - and if that house is rated an "F" the owner would be smart to give it to you for a dollar. If you are unfamiliar with the Streamlined 203K program, you can read more about it here.
Your earlier statement about banks being less motivated to get properties off their books is why I brought this up. Here is the listing from the organization who owns the house: (there's a slightly better picture here, too.)
Rose Inventory Listing (http://www.roselandco.com/invItemAlt.jsp?property_id=144995 - broken link)

Is the 203K or Streamlined 203K available to someone who already owns a home?

Quote:
I would be glad to give you a hand with this, once I move to Youngstown - which may be in the next 30 days if everything falls into place.
You sound a lot surer about moving to Youngstown. Good luck!

Again, thanks for the advice everyone.
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Old 01-24-2009, 12:12 AM
 
Location: Cortland, Ohio
3,170 posts, read 6,674,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KenD View Post
CortlandGirl79,

Again, if you're buying or selling a home in the $50K range, the 6% commission is real money to a broker, especially if you look at the cost that can be involved in selling a house. In the $10K range, 6% is (quite literally) nothing to pay someone to take a few hours, drive around, pay for gasoline, and whatever other incidental expenses that rack up along the way.

Please don't misunderstand me, I know that this is an issue for them, I also know that in Youngstown's case, it is adding to the problems.

Right now, we've been living in western Maryland fr the last almost four years, but we're not originally from this area. We do like it here, have managed to settle in but there isn't all if the variety I know a city like Youngstown can provide.

The other three families I have interested are from the Virginia/DC area. One is an older couple, semi retired, that are a business partner of mine. As of next month he is going to be getting Social Security and is looking to spend less. I showed him a beautiful house today, asking $35K, and he added it to his list of places to visit tomorrow. The other two families were attracted by the idea of buying a house outright as opposed to paying through the nose for basically the same lifestyle.

We'll see.
I see what you're saying about commission on a 10k house. If i was a realtor in today's market i'd be happy to make the $600 if i was the listing agent and got the full commission. Even $300 dollars would be more than some of them are making at the moment.

What they should really do is try and think about the future. If they are good to their client when they are looking, perhaps the client will use the realtor to sell, and perhaps they buyer would tell their friends how great a job they did helping you buy/sell your house. I would probably do it just because i love to help people and enjoy seeing all different types of homes.

Wow, i suppose you guys will be saving a lot on housing moving to the Youngstown area. I've heard of a lot of retirees moving here for the cheap housing. I had one prof in school that knew of at least four NYC cops that retired to the west side.
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Old 01-24-2009, 04:49 AM
 
69 posts, read 130,205 times
Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
As a single guy, I think my tolerance for "safe" is higher than yours.
When I was about your age I live three blocks away from Cabrini Green in Chicago - never had a problem - so I do understand and agree with your point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
But, I think Fifth Ave., Crandall Park, and--to a somewhat lesser extent--Wick Park are stabilizing influences on that side of the city. So, I'd probably stay west of Elm St. and east of Belmont Ave. And, I think the neighborhoods get more stable as you head north on Fifth Ave. But, I'm not familiar enough with the area to consider my advice sound.
My wife has indicated that she is somewhat concerned about taking a wrong turn and ending up somewhere she shouldn't. I appreciate the head's up as to where the really not so good places are.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
As someone in their early 30's who is growing old too soon, an aspect of the north side that I like is that it is the most "bohemian" part of the city. There are lots more college students and young professionals on the north side. The west side is more family oriented/blue collar.
As someone who apparently has already gotten old, I hear you, just not as well as I might have when I was younger.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Check out this page detailing recent home sales in the area:
http://www.city-data.com/real-estate...-OH-44504.html
You know, for the life of me I can't understand why anyone would pay that kind of money for a home in downtown Youngstown, with some obvious exceptions. In the last month or three (I can't remember, it's that age thing we talked about a while ago) I have looked at every single listing from the Real Estate broker's sites to Google Earth and Microsoft's Maps. Being the net addicted kind of guy that I am, I hunt down Sheriff's Sales information, HUD, Fannie Mae, Freddie MAC as well as all of the major mortgage lender's REO lists to collate all of that data so as to know what fair market pricing should be.

Either some people are paying WAY to much or I got a killer deal.

However, value is something that is perceived by the buyer and seller - not by my personal taste or what I believe the value is set at.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
I don't expect to get $80k-90k for the house.(as you can see from the link, houses in the same neighborhood were selling in that range in the spring/summer of '08) But, if I do it right, I think I could get $50k.
Remember - never bet on future appreciation, or even current market conditions to predict price.

Still, if you are planning to live there and the house is within your means, please tell me how I can help.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
I realize that I'm being too emotional about this. I'm thinking about this house like some people think about cats and dogs in the local humane society. (They can't save them all, but they could save one.) And, unlike animals who reproduce, these houses are a non-renewable resource--when they're gone, they're gone forever.
I tend to think of them as classic cars - some can and should be restored, some are parts and some are junkyard bound. A Frank Lloyd Wright needs to be saves, a foursquare is more like a 1985 Dodge Aries.

But, I'm not the last authority on anything in this world, I have learned that over the years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
It is fairly average. It's a medium quality, brick American Foursquare. I like its simplicity. To me, it gets a lot of points for being both brick and Foursquare.
The last home I owned was a 1897 foursquare. I wouldn't do it again. Those homes were built for a different time, the rooms are not conducive to my lifestyle and the layout is wrong for what I need. You may look on it differently.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
While the house may not be historic, I think its architecture and quality make it worth saving.
To each their own - that's what keeps diversity alive in our world and that's a very important thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Here are some other houses that are in the same circumstances, (and same zip code) and I wouldn't be as upset if they met with the wrecking ball.
Listings Search: Eaton Group, Inc. GMAC Real Estate
Listings Search: Eaton Group, Inc. GMAC Real Estate
Or even...
Listings Search: Eaton Group, Inc. GMAC Real Estate
We actually agree here, these homes demonstrate "average" to me with no real redeeming features. Of course, the house I got a verbal on last night was built during that time period and you'd probably condemn it to the wrecking ball - so there's that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Your earlier statement about banks being less motivated to get properties off their books is why I brought this up. Here is the listing from the organization who owns the house: (there's a slightly better picture here, too.)
Rose Inventory Listing (http://www.roselandco.com/invItemAlt.jsp?property_id=144995 - broken link)
Ah yes, Rose...

Did you look at the interest rates that company is offering? 11% or better!

Considering that traditional 15 year mortgages are below 5% now, I'm going to suggest that having Rose handle your financing is going to be expensive.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Is the 203K or Streamlined 203K available to someone who already owns a home?
You know, I don't know. When I get a minute I'll see if I can read up on it for you - but right now there's a lot of boxes to begin packing and logistics to figure out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
You sound a lot surer about moving to Youngstown. Good luck!
I like to tell people that nothing is assured until after it's happened and the check hasn't been sent out yet, let alone cleared the bank - but it does look like we will be moving to Youngstown in the next month or so. I'll keep you all posted.
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Old 01-24-2009, 05:03 AM
 
69 posts, read 130,205 times
Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by CortlandGirl79 View Post
I see what you're saying about commission on a 10k house. If i was a realtor in today's market i'd be happy to make the $600 if i was the listing agent and got the full commission. Even $300 dollars would be more than some of them are making at the moment.
If you look at having to pay for an office, business telephone, advertising, etc., that $300 isn't really worth spending a lot of time on, it's a loss unless you can answer the phone and get a check.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CortlandGirl79 View Post
What they should really do is try and think about the future. If they are good to their client when they are looking, perhaps the client will use the realtor to sell, and perhaps they buyer would tell their friends how great a job they did helping you buy/sell your house. I would probably do it just because i love to help people and enjoy seeing all different types of homes.
You could very easily go broke doing that but I think you would make an excellent real estate broker.

As to what brokers should do and actually do, I'll leave that up to them to decide. What needs to happen is for some enterprising group of people to fill in that gap - in a way that is both sustainable and gets the job done.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CortlandGirl79 View Post
Wow, i suppose you guys will be saving a lot on housing moving to the Youngstown area. I've heard of a lot of retirees moving here for the cheap housing. I had one prof in school that knew of at least four NYC cops that retired to the west side.
Currently paying $775/month (plus everything) to rent a house. When we moved here, we weren't sure if we would like it, so we decided to rent until we made the decision. We do like it here but there are a lot of things that I want that are missing. I am hoping Youngstown will provide them and it looks like many of the things I am looking for are there.

As we are buying a house for cash, we will have dropped our monthly bills by several hundred dollars per month (not including maintenance) and we would like to think that if we decided to sell we would get our money back, maybe plus some due to the work we will do, instead of moving out and getting nothing more than our security deposit back.

Now, one of my friends, who will be looking at houses in Youngstown today, was paying over $3K/month for a very nice house in Virginia and is now looking to buy a house that the seller (who is motivated to sell) is asking $35K. The home is to die for, beautiful, even if it needs some work. He is also looking at another home that has an asking price below $20K which is also quite stunning.

Overall, since he will be paying cash, he will be saving the better part of $3K/month, which is quite a savings.
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Old 01-24-2009, 05:41 AM
 
69 posts, read 130,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
On the vacant properties survey, it was given an "F" because there is a hole in the roof. (among other things, I'm sure.)
Hey JR_C,

How did you establish that this particular house was rated an "F" on the vacant properties survey? Is there a detailed list that allows for the exact address to be matched with the condition or did you expand the map and zero in on what you believe is the house?

Believe it or not having a way to search down to the individual address would be very valuable to me, right about now.
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Old 01-24-2009, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
3,262 posts, read 4,142,914 times
Reputation: 2033
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenD View Post
When I was about your age I live three blocks away from Cabrini Green in Chicago - never had a problem - so I do understand and agree with your point.
I'm glad you understand. Not everyone on this site does. But, I don't think any place on the north side could be compared with Cabrini Green. (at least how it was portrayed in urban legends--the reality may have been different)

Quote:
You know, for the life of me I can't understand why anyone would pay that kind of money for a home in downtown Youngstown, with some obvious exceptions...
...Either some people are paying WAY to much or I got a killer deal.

However, value is something that is perceived by the buyer and seller - not by my personal taste or what I believe the value is set at.
I'm certainly no real estate expert, but home values around here can vary widely over a short range of distance in this city. (maybe this area?) And, value drops exponentially with neglect, damage, and motivation to sell. On the other hand, in my current neighborhood, you can find a few finished/move-in ready houses currently listed at or below the $50k mark, and they will almost surely sell for less. As far as I know, there have been no houses in my neighborhood that have sold (legitimately) for more than $60k, over the last 5 years. But, I'm positive I'd get more than $25k for my current house.

Quote:
Still, if you are planning to live there and the house is within your means, please tell me how I can help.
I really appreciate the offer. We'll see if I need to take you up on it. Right now, I'd rather help you though, since you're the one making the big move to an area you still don't know well.

Quote:
I tend to think of them as classic cars - some can and should be restored, some are parts and some are junkyard bound. A Frank Lloyd Wright needs to be saves, a foursquare is more like a 1985 Dodge Aries.
In addition to being an armchair realtor, I'm also a classic car enthusiast, so I'm glad you mentioned them. To me, a FLW house is equivalent to a Duesenberg. I would consider the north side house in question to be 1930's Packard, and the Foursquare house in my neighborhood would probably be something like a 1952 Chevrolet. To me, a 1970's split-level ranch would be more comparable to a 1985 Dodge Aries.

Quote:
The last home I owned was a 1897 foursquare. I wouldn't do it again. Those homes were built for a different time, the rooms are not conducive to my lifestyle and the layout is wrong for what I need. You may look on it differently.
I do. In the 1960's and 1970's, many people looked at old Victorian houses with the same sort of disdain. They were old and dowdy. But now, they are sought after. While I like Victorians, I happen to prefer homes from the first quarter of the 20th century, over homes from the last half of the 19th.

Quote:
We actually agree here, these homes demonstrate "average" to me with no real redeeming features. Of course, the house I got a verbal on last night was built during that time period and you'd probably condemn it to the wrecking ball - so there's that.
Don't get me wrong, I hate to see any house demolished. But, they are just "Chevrolet." If I'm going to save a Chevy, I'd rather save the one in my current neighborhood.

Quote:
Ah yes, Rose...

Did you look at the interest rates that company is offering? 11% or better!

Considering that traditional 15 year mortgages are below 5% now, I'm going to suggest that having Rose handle your financing is going to be expensive.
I laughed when I read those terms. But, just to be clear about how new this north side house issue is for me, I haven't even started to look at financing options yet.

Quote:
You know, I don't know. When I get a minute I'll see if I can read up on it for you - but right now there's a lot of boxes to begin packing and logistics to figure out.
Don't worry about it. You have many more important things to worry about. If I get serious, I'll find out.

Quote:
How did you establish that this particular house was rated an "F" on the vacant properties survey? Is there a detailed list that allows for the exact address to be matched with the condition or did you expand the map and zero in on what you believe is the house?
I just zoomed in on the map. (400%) On the north side of Fairgreen, (the second E-W street above Wick Park) there are only 3 vacant houses on this particular block, and only 2 on the north side of the street. So, it was pretty easy to pick out "my" house.

Quote:
I like to tell people that nothing is assured until after it's happened and the check hasn't been sent out yet, let alone cleared the bank - but it does look like we will be moving to Youngstown in the next month or so. I'll keep you all posted.
Again, good luck, and--hopefully--welcome!
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Old 01-24-2009, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Cortland, Ohio
3,170 posts, read 6,674,263 times
Reputation: 1320
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenD View Post
If you look at having to pay for an office, business telephone, advertising, etc., that $300 isn't really worth spending a lot of time on, it's a loss unless you can answer the phone and get a check.



You could very easily go broke doing that but I think you would make an excellent real estate broker.

As to what brokers should do and actually do, I'll leave that up to them to decide. What needs to happen is for some enterprising group of people to fill in that gap - in a way that is both sustainable and gets the job done.



Currently paying $775/month (plus everything) to rent a house. When we moved here, we weren't sure if we would like it, so we decided to rent until we made the decision. We do like it here but there are a lot of things that I want that are missing. I am hoping Youngstown will provide them and it looks like many of the things I am looking for are there.

As we are buying a house for cash, we will have dropped our monthly bills by several hundred dollars per month (not including maintenance) and we would like to think that if we decided to sell we would get our money back, maybe plus some due to the work we will do, instead of moving out and getting nothing more than our security deposit back.

Now, one of my friends, who will be looking at houses in Youngstown today, was paying over $3K/month for a very nice house in Virginia and is now looking to buy a house that the seller (who is motivated to sell) is asking $35K. The home is to die for, beautiful, even if it needs some work. He is also looking at another home that has an asking price below $20K which is also quite stunning.

Overall, since he will be paying cash, he will be saving the better part of $3K/month, which is quite a savings.
Wow, sounds like you and your friend will both be saving a lot of money. I definitely give you guys props for looking into an area w/such a bad reputation. How exactly did you come across Youngstown and decide to move here? I think it's great that you all will be living in the homes and fixing them up. We have more than enough slum lords in Warren/Youngstown and it can only help the area when a homeowner actually lives in and takes care of their home.
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