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Old 12-16-2011, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
7,789 posts, read 5,069,514 times
Reputation: 2653

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
No, you missed my point. Columbus only has 1 institution of higher learning that provides students with an education level beyond another 4 years of high school.
Wow, that is not only extremely arrogant, but disregards all the work of those schools and students who seek higher education.

That must be why Brookings plainly says Columbus has a higher educated population than Cincinnati. I thought it harsh at first, but you're making me rethink my initial impression.
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Old 12-16-2011, 11:28 AM
 
2,485 posts, read 2,133,470 times
Reputation: 1321
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Cincinnati and Dayton are not in the same metro, no matter how many times this is repeated. The Census does not designate them as one metro, and they are the determining organization. In fact, they're not even part of the same CSA.
They are very much becoming one integrated metro, much to your apparent chagrin. Many, many people live in one and work in the other; there is seamless development now between the cities; the cities share radio stations and advertisers target both markets with the same commercials; the cities are considered the same region for Ohio high school sports; UC, Xavier, Dayton and Miami have long made up the mythical Miami Valley Conference; Centerville and Springboro are closer to Mason than they are to northern Dayton suburbs such as Englewood and Huber Heights; congressional districts (including John Boehner's) overlap both Cincinnati and Dayton; the Reds Single A team is in Dayton; Cincinnati brands are all over Dayton (Skyline, Gold Star, LaRosa's, Kroger, Graeter's, Moerlein, Mt. Carmel, etc.); the Cincinnati Enquirer is available all over Dayton in Kroger stores, etc.

Cincinnati and Dayton will be considered one for the next census period in 2020.

Last edited by abr7rmj; 12-16-2011 at 11:42 AM..
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Old 12-16-2011, 11:42 AM
 
4,234 posts, read 3,109,559 times
Reputation: 1842
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Wow, that is not only extremely arrogant, but disregards all the work of those schools and students who seek higher education.

That must be why Brookings plainly says Columbus has a higher educated population than Cincinnati. I thought it harsh at first, but you're making me rethink my initial impression.

American Factfinder data says Cincinnati has more people enrolled in college.
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Old 12-16-2011, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
7,789 posts, read 5,069,514 times
Reputation: 2653
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
They are very much becoming one integrated metro, much to your apparent chagrin. Many people live in one and work in the other. Centerville and Springboro are closer to Mason than they are to northern Dayton suburbs such as Englewood and Huber Heights. Cincinnati and Dayton will be considered one for the next census period in 2020.
I'm not arguing that they don't have any connections, and perhaps over time they will eventually meet the requirements to officially be designated a combined metro. My argument is that they are not combined right now and people who keep repeating this idea are incorrect. It just seems strange that people who value the metro designation continue to ignore the requirements needed to actually have one. Cincy is already the largest metro in the state, it's growing and seems to be doing okay for the most part. Dayton, not so much, so I'm not even sure what benefits there are to adding the Dayton metro beyond a perceived population increase (which Cincy metro already has). Also, not sure why it would be to my chagrin considering, again, that it's already a bigger metro than Columbus.

Last edited by jbcmh81; 12-16-2011 at 11:57 AM..
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Old 12-16-2011, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
7,789 posts, read 5,069,514 times
Reputation: 2653
Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
American Factfinder data says Cincinnati has more people enrolled in college.
That's great, but what does that have to do with having a higher-educated population? This actually might indicate that more people get degrees in Cincinnati... and then promptly move away after school. Perhaps Columbus has been able to keep more of its college graduates and that is why educational attainment is higher here.

I think Cincinnati is a fine city with fine educational institutions, but your posts reek of arrogance. While not all schools can be Ivy League, I applaud anyone seeking higher education in the field of their choice, especially when it has become increasingly difficult to afford. There should never be mocking of higher education, no matter how great you think the local schools are in comparison. And this is certainly no indictment of Columbus' schools compared to Cincinnatis.
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Old 12-16-2011, 11:59 AM
 
4,234 posts, read 3,109,559 times
Reputation: 1842
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
That's great, but what does that have to do with having a higher-educated population? This actually might indicate that more people get degrees in Cincinnati... and then promptly move away after school. Perhaps Columbus has been able to keep more of its college graduates and that is why educational attainment is higher here.

People who get degrees in Columbus also move away.
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Old 12-16-2011, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Far from where I'd like to be
25,612 posts, read 32,401,940 times
Reputation: 37729
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
the Cincinnati Enquirer is available all over Dayton in Kroger stores, etc.
And that's a good thing how?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
People who get degrees in Columbus also move away.
People who get degrees in Cincinnati also move away.

Give it up, dude. You're not convincing anyone.
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Old 12-16-2011, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
7,789 posts, read 5,069,514 times
Reputation: 2653
Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
People who get degrees in Columbus also move away.
True, but my point is that perhaps Columbus has a higher retainment rate of college graduates than Cincinnati, and that can explain the difference in population education levels between the two cities. Basically, I'm just offering a possible explanation for where Brookings was getting their numbers.
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Old 12-16-2011, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
7,789 posts, read 5,069,514 times
Reputation: 2653
Quote:
Originally Posted by abr7rmj View Post
They are very much becoming one integrated metro, much to your apparent chagrin. Many, many people live in one and work in the other; there is seamless development now between the cities; the cities share radio stations and advertisers target both markets with the same commercials; the cities are considered the same region for Ohio high school sports; UC, Xavier, Dayton and Miami have long made up the mythical Miami Valley Conference; Centerville and Springboro are closer to Mason than they are to northern Dayton suburbs such as Englewood and Huber Heights; congressional districts (including John Boehner's) overlap both Cincinnati and Dayton; the Reds Single A team is in Dayton; Cincinnati brands are all over Dayton (Skyline, Gold Star, LaRosa's, Kroger, Graeter's, Moerlein, Mt. Carmel, etc.); the Cincinnati Enquirer is available all over Dayton in Kroger stores, etc.

Cincinnati and Dayton will be considered one for the next census period in 2020.
If it doesn't meet the Census requirements, they won't. If they do, they will, but we have another 8 years before we find out. Do we really have to have people claim they're a combined metro nearly a decade before anyone knows for sure? I'm sure many people thought they were already a metro in 2010... but nope, they were not. Cincinnati and Dayton brands are also in Columbus, and vice versa. The perpetuation of company brands is not a metro requirement.
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Old 12-16-2011, 12:34 PM
 
4,234 posts, read 3,109,559 times
Reputation: 1842
Quote:
And that's a good thing how?



It's good because people in Dayton can buy the Cincinnati Enquirer instead of the Dayton Daily News.
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