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Old 09-08-2016, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,410 posts, read 5,438,201 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
Southern Ohio has Southern influences but with the exception of the Southeastern Ohio I would not call it truly Southern. It's Midwestern first before anything else. Same with the vast majority of Missouri.
I wouldn't even call southeastern Ohio truly southern. Most of its "southerness" is imported from Kentucky and deeper WV. Ohio itself didn't originate much of that.
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Old 09-11-2016, 04:36 PM
 
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A lot of people who live in Cincinnati are from Kentucky so I will consider this the south. A lot of people that live here have a TWANG
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Old 09-11-2016, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Originally Posted by lydunn View Post
A lot of people who live in Cincinnati are from Kentucky so I will consider this the south. A lot of people that live here have a TWANG
There aren't enough Southerners in Cincinnati to make it anything Southern. Boone and Kenton counties in KY are very Midwestern.
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Old 09-11-2016, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lydunn View Post
A lot of people who live in Cincinnati are from Kentucky so I will consider this the south. A lot of people that live here have a TWANG
Southerners living in the north don't make the north the south.

Northerners living in the south don't make the south the north.

Florida is still a southern state. Ohio is still a northern state. A lot of Mexicans live in Texas but Texas is not part of Mexico as a result. A lot of Chinese live in California but California is not part of China as a result. New York contains many Canadian transplants but is not part of Canada as a result.

Ohio is a northern state with southern transplants and southern influence. Makes sense being around the border.
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Old 09-11-2016, 11:36 PM
 
2,426 posts, read 979,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
I wouldn't even call southeastern Ohio truly southern. Most of its "southerness" is imported from Kentucky and deeper WV. Ohio itself didn't originate much of that.
I did my family history a few years ago, and when looking at the census pages describing the earliest settlers if my area (Gallia County, Ohio) virtually every single settler had his or her state of birth recorded as being either Virginia or North Carolina. West Virginia was at that time, of course, part of Virginia....but many of my ancestors....and I suspect many of the other migrants to the area...did hail from areas within modern day Virginia. And North Carolina speaks for itself. The Virginia Military District..
the region between the Scioto and Little Miami Rivers, was settled largely by Revolutionary War veterans from Virginia who had received land grants from Virginia...which retained land title (as a property owner) to this area when it relinquished sovereignty over southern Ohio in 1785 in order to give it's Revolutionary veterans the lands they had been promised in return for their military service. Many of the people in that area to this day are the descendants of those veterans. I think, with a few exceptions, such as Marietta...settled largely by New Englanders...much of southeastern Ohio was settled by southerners, with much of the area receiving little in-migration since that time, and that makes that region a completely different animal from the rest of the state. You can make no assumptions about southeastern Ohio based on overall impressions of the state including Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, or any of the states urban or rural flatland areas....the southeastern part of the state is a completely different animal.
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Old 09-12-2016, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robertbrianbush View Post
I did my family history a few years ago, and when looking at the census pages describing the earliest settlers if my area (Gallia County, Ohio) virtually every single settler had his or her state of birth recorded as being either Virginia or North Carolina. West Virginia was at that time, of course, part of Virginia....but many of my ancestors....and I suspect many of the other migrants to the area...did hail from areas within modern day Virginia. And North Carolina speaks for itself. The Virginia Military District..
the region between the Scioto and Little Miami Rivers, was settled largely by Revolutionary War veterans from Virginia who had received land grants from Virginia...which retained land title (as a property owner) to this area when it relinquished sovereignty over southern Ohio in 1785 in order to give it's Revolutionary veterans the lands they had been promised in return for their military service. Many of the people in that area to this day are the descendants of those veterans. I think, with a few exceptions, such as Marietta...settled largely by New Englanders...much of southeastern Ohio was settled by southerners, with much of the area receiving little in-migration since that time, and that makes that region a completely different animal from the rest of the state. You can make no assumptions about southeastern Ohio based on overall impressions of the state including Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, or any of the states urban or rural flatland areas....the southeastern part of the state is a completely different animal.
People always default to how a place was settled well over 100 years ago. That is not really relevant anymore. It just isn't. Most people in the states have roots all over the place these days and cultures are entirely different now from what they were then.

So they moved into a northern state even then, still doesn't make Ohio southern. Would you say NYC is a foreign country because of its high non-American born population?
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Old 09-12-2016, 12:23 AM
 
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One time while working at a restaurant in LA, I had a family on vacation. They had a Southern accent so I asked where they were from. They said Cincinnati. I was shocked.

I wouldn't say Cincinnati and Southern Ohio as a whole are Southern, but obvious influences. Cincinnati is basically the opposite of Louisville. Louisville is a Southern city with very strong Midwest influences. Cincinnati is a Midwest city with very strong Southern influences. I find them very similar.
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Old 09-12-2016, 12:44 AM
 
2,426 posts, read 979,117 times
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Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
People always default to how a place was settled well over 100 years ago. That is not really relevant anymore. It just isn't. Most people in the states have roots all over the place these days and cultures are entirely different now from what they were then.

So they moved into a northern state even then, still doesn't make Ohio southern. Would you say NYC is a foreign country because of its high non-American born population?
Actually, who settled an area a hundred years ago is very relevant....in southeast Ohio it explains a lot.. .from politics to what church denominations predominate etc. In southeast Ohio most people are descended from those who migrated here prior to 1850..and most are of predominantly Scotch-Irish ancestry...it is by and large an area where most people do not have roots from all over the place. This is actually one of the defining characteristics of the region...anyyone who does not realize that has no familiarity with the region or it's people. I wouldn't consider NYC to be a foreign country, no, but it's inhabitants don't predominantly come from one culture. If it had been settled ninety-nine percent by one cultural group with very little in-migration since then I would definitely expect it to still be part of that cultural groups sphere. In the case of Gallia County when I did my family history I also read a lot of newspapers from the 1870s, 1880s, etc. Not only are many cultural traits preserved, but many of the same families that made up the criminal element then were the same ones that made up part of the criminal element today, many of the business families were the same, many of the families heavily represented in the educational field are still so today, etc. A LOT of our attitudes and predilections are inherited from our ancestors, much more than we realize. And, you can't use an urban model such as NYC to understand the history of a very rural area. Nobody who is familiar with southeast Ohio can miss the fact that is is influenced by southern culture far more than any other part of the state. The fact that the overwhelming majority of the early settlers were from southern states certainly explains much of the modern day culture of that area. I have lived in multiple areas of the state, and can vouch that the southeast is a totally different animal from the rest of the state. And, when I say there has been very little immigration to that area I mean that when I go back to the early nineteenth century census records I recognize the vast majority of surnames as being those of families I know today, and every single one of my maternal ancestors who was alive in 1850 was living in Gallia County....and going back that many generations you are talking about between sixty-four and a hundred and twenty eight people. Most people I went to high school had roots in the area just as deep.
People who are long time residents of and who have centuries deep family roots in a region and who are telling you that it has deep cultural affinities with the south aren't going to be people who just noticed that the census has recorded their distant ancestors as having had been predominantly born in southern states and decided simply on that basis that the area is culturally tilted toward the South. They are going to KNOW, from long experience, that it tilts southern culturally, and will simply see the origin of their ancestors and those of most other members of their communities, when they learn of it, as a very likely explanation for that tilt. History doesn't follow arbitrary borders drawn on maps.

Last edited by robertbrianbush; 09-12-2016 at 01:15 AM..
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Old 09-12-2016, 02:28 AM
 
4,693 posts, read 5,106,455 times
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I haven't been to Cincinnati but have known a lot of people from there when I lived in Las Vegas, both transplants and tourists. I didn't get any Southern vibe from any of them. They were totally Midwestern.
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Old 09-12-2016, 06:30 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
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Absolutely not, I have spent much of my life in Ohio and know southern Ohio quite well. It is very different from Tennessee or Alabama. To me it has no southern resemblance.
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