U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oklahoma
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-10-2010, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK, USA
31 posts, read 142,695 times
Reputation: 23

Advertisements

I'm from Tulsa and have always wondered this. Most people here have the regular, or no-accent accent and when people move to Tulsa that do have a southern type of accent, it's usually because they're from Texas or Arkansas, but mostly Texas. Same with Oklahoma City; I used to visit that place a lot and have rarely heard a "ya'll" from anyone, but then again, I haven't met everyone who lives in Oklahoma. I also saw that somebody wrote that we eat "grits" in Oklahoma. Since when? I have never heard of anyone eating such a food here. When I think of grits, I think of Alabama or Georgia (and sometimes the movie My Cousin Vinny lol), but definitely NOT Oklahoma. When it comes to religion, I've noticed that yes, we're in the bible belt, but then again so are Missouri, Kansas, and southern parts of Illinois and Indiana. I know that a lot of this state is southern Baptist but there are also about 5,000 Jews, 6,000 Muslims, 13% Catholic, and other religions like Wicca, Unitarian, and New Age.

Geographically speaking, we're in the central plains/heartland region, west of the Mississippi River, north of Texas, and even have Oklahoma's 7th largest city named Midwest City. Wouldn't we technically qualify as a midwest state right there?

Here are some sites that include it as a midwest state:
http://www.poccentral.com/lmidwest.asp
http://www.city-data.com/forum/attac...ap-midwest.jpg
http://www.dahlsten.com/driveropportunities.htm (broken link)
http://www.realtyservices.pnc.com/rs...tings&Sub=News
http://www.nffs.org/mem-directory-midwest.html (broken link)
http://www.filminamerica.com/Regions/


Discuss....

Last edited by archer_22; 09-10-2010 at 02:46 PM.. Reason: I had to include a map
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-10-2010, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Lawton/ Medicine Park area
81 posts, read 259,320 times
Reputation: 136
I live in Lawton and we eat grits all the time for breakfast. Maybe its the Military in me that got me started on them but I know alot of people that eat them that are not or have not been in the Military.

Religion - There are alot more different types that what was listed. Unless you are grouping all types of Baptist under the title Southern Baptist?
Here in Lawton we have Methodist, First Baptist, Non-Denomination, and just plain Christian churches just to name a few.

As far as location goes, Midwest or Central Plains state sound about right.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2010, 08:19 PM
 
2,560 posts, read 5,398,570 times
Reputation: 961
I don't consider it South, but I'm from Kansas City, Kansas.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2010, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK, USA
31 posts, read 142,695 times
Reputation: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by j67bubba View Post
Religion - There are alot more different types that what was listed. Unless you are grouping all types of Baptist under the title Southern Baptist?
Most of the Baptists here call themselves Southern Baptists, but I know that not all Baptists are Southern Baptists.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2010, 12:30 AM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,483 posts, read 8,262,164 times
Reputation: 3167
Quote:
Originally Posted by archer_22 View Post
I'm from Tulsa and have always wondered this. Most people here have the regular, or no-accent accent and when people move to Tulsa that do have a southern type of accent, it's usually because they're from Texas or Arkansas, but mostly Texas. Same with Oklahoma City; I used to visit that place a lot and have rarely heard a "ya'll" from anyone, but then again, I haven't met everyone who lives in Oklahoma. I also saw that somebody wrote that we eat "grits" in Oklahoma. Since when? I have never heard of anyone eating such a food here. When I think of grits, I think of Alabama or Georgia (and sometimes the movie My Cousin Vinny lol), but definitely NOT Oklahoma. When it comes to religion, I've noticed that yes, we're in the bible belt, but then again so are Missouri, Kansas, and southern parts of Illinois and Indiana. I know that a lot of this state is southern Baptist but there are also about 5,000 Jews, 6,000 Muslims, 13% Catholic, and other religions like Wicca, Unitarian, and New Age.

Geographically speaking, we're in the central plains/heartland region, west of the Mississippi River, north of Texas, and even have Oklahoma's 7th largest city named Midwest City. Wouldn't we technically qualify as a midwest state right there?

Here are some sites that include it as a midwest state:
Little Feat - Point Of Contact - Eastern Midwest Region
http://www.city-data.com/forum/attac...ap-midwest.jpg
Dahlsten Driver Opportunities (http://www.dahlsten.com/driveropportunities.htm - broken link)
Midwest
NFFS MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY (http://www.nffs.org/mem-directory-midwest.html - broken link)
Film in America -- Filming Locations for TV and Movies in the United States -- Maps and Regions


Discuss....
There have been multiple threads about this so read back through those. The vast majority of Native Okies would not include the Sooner State in the Midwest. (There are actually legitimate studies that have proved this.) There are transplants every now and then that seem to think of OK as the Midwest....perhaps geographically but never culturally = far too much Southern migration/settlement history. A more accurate regional inquiry would be to ask: Is Oklahoma more Southern or Southwestern, or just plain Western?

Also, the links that you provided are not really official regional/topographical/cultural designations. A couple of the links had Arkansas and Texas included in the Midwest as well....now that is a stretch for sure. I do not know many Texans or Arkies that would claim the Midwest, nor do I know of any respected national maps/regional designations that would include Texas/Arkansas/or Oklahoma in the Midwest. The Census has us in the West South Central along with Texas, Arkie, and Louisiana which is probably about right. I prefer South-Central as it is the best geographic signifier for Oklahoma, and clearly delineates OK culturally from the Midwest to the North and the Deep South to the East. Oklahoma has strong Western influences as well as some Southern influences, so it's a little bit of those all rolled into one making it a very unique state which I love!

Also, it might be good to keep in mind that Tulsa/OK City...while the most populated, do not represent the culture of the whole state. Go to a small town in Oklahoma and tell them they speak like a Midwesterner and you'll get laughed at. As with all big cities, there's quite a bit of transplantation in OK City/Tulsa, which is not indicative of the rest of the state.

See Wikipedia....it has a pretty good run down of OK's geographic location/culture. It mentions that OK is included in the Southern United States as well as the Great Plains. That's about right....kinda a mixture of those two regions. How about Plains-South or Western-South? That's pretty good too.

Again, I think the best thing to do would be to read back through some of the other threads on this.

Cheers.

Last edited by Bass&Catfish2008; 09-11-2010 at 01:04 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2010, 11:17 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,926,425 times
Reputation: 5781
Speaking as a native Texan, I always thought that Oklahoma was -- at the least -- more Southern than anything else. Especially the southern and eastern sections. When placed within a recognized region of the country, I would, personally, include it in the South. A few more points to your very interesting post and points...

Quote:
Originally Posted by archer_22 View Post
I'm from Tulsa and have always wondered this. Most people here have the regular, or no-accent accent and when people move to Tulsa that do have a southern type of accent, it's usually because they're from Texas or Arkansas, but mostly Texas. Same with Oklahoma City; I used to visit that place a lot and have rarely heard a "ya'll" from anyone, but then again, I haven't met everyone who lives in Oklahoma.
Well, according to the Harvard dialect study, a decided majority of Oklahomans use either "y'all" or "you all" to refer to a group of more than one person (with the former a plurality) :

Dialect Survey Results: OKLAHOMA

50. What word(s) do you use to address a group of two or more people?
a. you all (24.89%)
b. yous, youse (0.43%)
d. you guys (18.03%)
e. you 'uns (0.43%)
g. you (8.15%)
h. other (1.72%)
i. y'all (46.35%)

Quote:
I also saw that somebody wrote that we eat "grits" in Oklahoma. Since when? I have never heard of anyone eating such a food here. When I think of grits, I think of Alabama or Georgia (and sometimes the movie My Cousin Vinny lol), but definitely NOT Oklahoma.
True that Oklahoma, even Texas as well, are not the states most likely to first come to mind when grits are mentioned. However, at the same time, both are part of the so-called "grits belt" according to a Pillsbury demographic study. But perhaps most importantly, is that grits are actually a part of the Official State Meal of Oklahoma! To wit:

Meal of Oklahoma

According to the Oklahoma state government, Oklahoma has a state meal, which was made official in Oklahoma's 1997-1998 almanac.

The state meal consists of fried okra, squash, cornbread, barbecue pork, biscuits, sausage and gravy, grits, corn, strawberries, chicken fried steak, pecan pie, and black-eyed peas
.

This makes me hungry, in fact! LOL

Quote:
When it comes to religion, I've noticed that yes, we're in the bible belt, but then again so are Missouri, Kansas, and southern parts of Illinois and Indiana. I know that a lot of this state is southern Baptist but there are also about 5,000 Jews, 6,000 Muslims, 13% Catholic, and other religions like Wicca, Unitarian, and New Age.
Yes, but Southern Baptist is far and away the front-runner. In fact, per capita, Oklahoma ranks very high on the list of states where the Southern Baptist Church is predominant:

Southern Baptist Convention statistics

Over half of all Southern Baptists in the world live in five Southern states: Texas, Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Alabama.

The states with the highest proportion of Southern Baptists are Mississippi, Alabama, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Kentucky.


Quote:
Geographically speaking, we're in the central plains/heartland region, west of the Mississippi River, north of Texas, and even have Oklahoma's 7th largest city named Midwest City. Wouldn't we technically qualify as a midwest state right there?
Not necessarily. I mean, in my hometown there is a university named "Midwestern State". I graduated from there, and once (when I worked for the campus newspaper) did a feature story which involved the orgin of the name. It had nothing to do with an identification with the Midwestern United States. Rather, it involved the fact that the location was at a "mid-western" point in the part of the country which at one time was the "Old Southwest", and today called the West South Central states according to the U.S. Census Bureau (i.e. Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana).

So in this instance, Midwest City (I don't know for sure of course) may simply refer to a geographic location within Oklahoma itself and not connected to a larger national region.

Now then, with all that said? HOOK EM' HORNS! (I did this for the benefit of my good friend, Bass&Catfish! Hee Hee).
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2010, 01:55 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,483 posts, read 8,262,164 times
Reputation: 3167
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
Speaking as a native Texan, I always thought that Oklahoma was -- at the least -- more Southern than anything else. Especially the southern and eastern sections. When placed within a recognized region of the country, I would, personally, include it in the South. A few more points to your very interesting post and points...



Well, according to the Harvard dialect study, a decided majority of Oklahomans use either "y'all" or "you all" to refer to a group of more than one person (with the former a plurality) :

Dialect Survey Results: OKLAHOMA

50. What word(s) do you use to address a group of two or more people?
a. you all (24.89%)
b. yous, youse (0.43%)
d. you guys (18.03%)
e. you 'uns (0.43%)
g. you (8.15%)
h. other (1.72%)
i. y'all (46.35%)



True that Oklahoma, even Texas as well, are not the states most likely to first come to mind when grits are mentioned. However, at the same time, both are part of the so-called "grits belt" according to a Pillsbury demographic study. But perhaps most importantly, is that grits are actually a part of the Official State Meal of Oklahoma! To wit:

Meal of Oklahoma

According to the Oklahoma state government, Oklahoma has a state meal, which was made official in Oklahoma's 1997-1998 almanac.

The state meal consists of fried okra, squash, cornbread, barbecue pork, biscuits, sausage and gravy, grits, corn, strawberries, chicken fried steak, pecan pie, and black-eyed peas.

This makes me hungry, in fact! LOL



Yes, but Southern Baptist is far and away the front-runner. In fact, per capita, Oklahoma ranks very high on the list of states where the Southern Baptist Church is predominant:

Southern Baptist Convention statistics

Over half of all Southern Baptists in the world live in five Southern states: Texas, Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Alabama.

The states with the highest proportion of Southern Baptists are Mississippi, Alabama, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Kentucky.



Not necessarily. I mean, in my hometown there is a university named "Midwestern State". I graduated from there, and once (when I worked for the campus newspaper) did a feature story which involved the orgin of the name. It had nothing to do with an identification with the Midwestern United States. Rather, it involved the fact that the location was at a "mid-western" point in the part of the country which at one time was the "Old Southwest", and today called the West South Central states according to the U.S. Census Bureau (i.e. Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana).

So in this instance, Midwest City (I don't know for sure of course) may simply refer to a geographic location within Oklahoma itself and not connected to a larger national region.

Now then, with all that said? HOOK EM' HORNS! (I did this for the benefit of my good friend, Bass&Catfish! Hee Hee).
Great post my good Friend! You always provided real-world insight and legitimate data to back up your assertions.

LOL on the Longhorn comment! I kinda bought into the offseason hype of the Sooners....but they appear to be relatively average. Utah State (UTAH STATE!) almost beat the Sooners at home....they'll have to play much better against the Seminoles today to win. The Red River Shootout...well, the Sooners are really gonna have to be a different team than what they've shown so far to win in Dallas. I'm still a Big 12 South fan so I'll be rooting for our respective teams to win out this weekend.

Blessings to you, Brother!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2010, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma City, OK
533 posts, read 1,580,673 times
Reputation: 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
Not necessarily. I mean, in my hometown there is a university named "Midwestern State". I graduated from there, and once (when I worked for the campus newspaper) did a feature story which involved the orgin of the name. It had nothing to do with an identification with the Midwestern United States. Rather, it involved the fact that the location was at a "mid-western" point in the part of the country which at one time was the "Old Southwest", and today called the West South Central states according to the U.S. Census Bureau (i.e. Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana).

So in this instance, Midwest City (I don't know for sure of course) may simply refer to a geographic location within Oklahoma itself and not connected to a larger national region.
Midwest City was named after the then (1940) name of the proposed military base to be built in the area: Midwest Air Depot. It was later renamed Tinker Air Force Base.

Reference: MIDWEST CITY
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2010, 04:39 PM
 
2,671 posts, read 2,961,130 times
Reputation: 1988
Geographically, I think of Oklahoma as South-Central. Ecologically, we're varied. We have multiple Level III ecoregions such as high plains, cross timbers and ozark highlands. Those aren't all of them, and the Level III ecoregions are sub-delineated into Level IV regions. Anyway, that's not really what we're talking about.

Culturally, we seem to be a mix of Western with a some Southern tossed in. Certainly not the deep South such as Alabama or Georgia, but we do have a southern bent. We also tend to be a bit western in our attitude. Attitude, meaning culture in this instance. Independent, rugged, and stand alone types.

I have never, ever, ever considered Oklahoma as Mid-western. Not ever. I don't even know what a mid-westerner is like, but I know I'm not it. I defintly don't want that mid-western, nasal accent.

And Okies most certainly have an accent. LOL, now when I lived in Montana and in Washington that's where I didn't hear much of an accent.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2010, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
3,190 posts, read 4,431,268 times
Reputation: 4174
I'd go for plains, south. I still remember the corn bread (with creme corn on top) and the chicken bbq's. Without question probably the friendliest place I've ever lived. Tulsa, 1963! And let's not forget the "five nations."
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oklahoma

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top