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Old 04-28-2011, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
179 posts, read 569,384 times
Reputation: 135

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This is the same racist b-word that had the rant about gays a few years ago. Now she's moved on to Blacks:

Sally Kern: Minorities Earn Less Because They Don't Work As Hard




Oklahoma state Rep. Sally Kern, a Republican, made questionable remarks in the wake of a measure seeking to ban affirmative action programs advancing in the state, Tulsa World reports.

According to the local outlet:

Rep. Sally Kern, R-Oklahoma City, said minorities earn less than white people because they don’t work as hard and have less initiative.

“We have a high percentage of blacks in prison, and that’s tragic, but are they in prison just because they are black or because they don’t want to study as hard in school? I’ve taught school, and I saw a lot of people of color who didn’t study hard because they said the government would take care of them.”

In light of the proposed constitutional amendment in question clearing the state House of Representatives on Wednesday evening, the GOP lawmaker also suggested women earn less than their male counterparts because they generally spend more time in the home.

The AP recently reported on the legislation:

The measure [will] put on the 2012 election ballot a provision that the state may not grant preferential treatment to any individual or group on the basis of race, color, sex, ethnicity or national origin. The ban would apply to public employment, education and contracting.

Opponents say the proposal targets a non-existent problem. Several Democrats contend the bill is an attempt to use race to generate fear and draw conservative white voters to the polls.

The Oklahoman reports:

Rep. Emily Virgin, D-Norman, one of the youngest members of the Legislature, said discrimination still occurs against women. She said she and her brother applied for home loans about the same time; her loan took longer to process and she had to make a larger down payment.

“I don't want a handout and I don't think any woman does,” she said.

Democratic state Rep. Jeannie McDaniel reportedly conveyed a similar sentiment, saying, “I don't believe women have reached their equal rights in Oklahoma," she said.
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Old 04-28-2011, 07:59 PM
 
Location: OK
2,740 posts, read 6,469,165 times
Reputation: 1889
She is a moron.
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Old 04-29-2011, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Both sides of the Red River
780 posts, read 1,955,193 times
Reputation: 1100
She is a scoundrel and needs to go away. Sadly, the district she represents (Bethany, West OKC area) is probably one of the most socially conservative urban districts in the state, so its not like she's going anywhere.

Strike it up as yet another politican bringing international shame to this state.
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Old 04-30-2011, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
14,768 posts, read 13,261,323 times
Reputation: 4484
She's going to be term limited out. Thank goodness, Republicans got term limits passed. Unfortunatley, due to how highly conservative her district is when she's out it won't come with a guarantee that she won't be replaced with someone just as loony. The person Kern replaced also too often jumped off the far right end.
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Old 05-02-2011, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Norman
81 posts, read 218,369 times
Reputation: 82
She looks amazingly like Sharon Angle from Nevada. I wonder if they were separated at birth?
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Old 05-03-2011, 03:01 PM
 
2,671 posts, read 2,795,317 times
Reputation: 1987
I don't know what district she hails from but I hope I never pass through that damned place. It's people like Kern, Inhofbacile, Sullivan, Boran, and well, all of the stupid Okie politicians that make it difficult for to stay here. Oh, and the summer weather, which I hate. Oh, and the potholes. And the stupid turnpikes for ****ty highways.

Kern is a blank, blanking, blank, and so too, are the Terrill and the rest of the OKC lot.

Unfortunately, Oklahoma is full of ______'s like Kern et al.
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Old 05-03-2011, 04:10 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,215 posts, read 17,889,053 times
Reputation: 14638
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sally Kern View Post
“We have a high percentage of blacks in prison, and that’s tragic, but are they in prison just because they are black or because they don’t want to study as hard in school? I’ve taught school, and I saw a lot of people of color who didn’t study hard because they said the government would take care of them.”
There are plenty of hard-working black people, but you know what? Sally Kern is correct to an extent. There is a segment of the black population in the United States that simply doesn't value education or hard work, and that segment is large enough to be easily noticed too. Yeah, there are plenty of white, Hispanic, and even Asian people who don't value education or hard work, but the difference for them is, such an attitude mostly originates at the family level, but among black people, it mostly originates at the neighborhood and community level, which makes it markedly more difficult to correct. It goes way beyond peer pressure at that point, and it ultimately results in socioeconomic isolation, which compounds the problem because you end up with a segment of the black population that doesn't know any better than to blame racism for their plight when it's not even the biggest problem anymore. Yeah, racism is still a problem from time to time, but if it was nearly as big of a problem as some black people seem to think it is, then there would be no black middle class in this country whatsoever, and the only upwardly-mobile black people would be those who can entertain us, whether by singing, acting or playing sports. And I'll reiterate: it's not all black people, nor is it even most, but it's still enough to be a noticeable trend.
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Old 05-03-2011, 08:40 PM
 
32,409 posts, read 17,724,395 times
Reputation: 35030
Good points, gnutella.

“We have a high percentage of blacks in prison, and that’s tragic, but are they in prison just because they are black or because they don’t want to study as hard in school? I’ve taught school, and I saw a lot of people of color who didn’t study hard because they said the government would take care of them.”

The problem I have with her statement is not only is it a blind generalization, but unless someone has worked in prison for an extensive period of time and learns WHY AA's and other minorities are over-represented, then they would not be making asinine statements as Kern has made.

Not studying hard is not enough to put a person in prison. Thank god.

Most of the people in prison are poor and most have not completed high school and most can thank substance abuse for their plight in life. Add to that equation, Oklahoma sentencing guidelines, which are beyond belief. We have guys doing 40 years for $40 worth of crack and others doing 20 years for marijuana scraped from pipes and then given 10 years for their zig zags.

Those are not exaggerations or small percentages. Most have failed drug court and repeatedly committed new felonies. That is what happens when they use "after formers" to enhance the sentencing guidelines.



http://www.doc.state.ok.us/newsroom/...ch_%202011.pdf

Last edited by _redbird_; 05-03-2011 at 08:51 PM..
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Old 05-04-2011, 06:59 AM
 
15,303 posts, read 7,821,308 times
Reputation: 7931
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
There are plenty of hard-working black people, but you know what? Sally Kern is correct to an extent. There is a segment of the black population in the United States that simply doesn't value education or hard work, and that segment is large enough to be easily noticed too. Yeah, there are plenty of white, Hispanic, and even Asian people who don't value education or hard work, but the difference for them is, such an attitude mostly originates at the family level, but among black people, it mostly originates at the neighborhood and community level, which makes it markedly more difficult to correct. It goes way beyond peer pressure at that point, and it ultimately results in socioeconomic isolation, which compounds the problem because you end up with a segment of the black population that doesn't know any better than to blame racism for their plight when it's not even the biggest problem anymore. Yeah, racism is still a problem from time to time, but if it was nearly as big of a problem as some black people seem to think it is, then there would be no black middle class in this country whatsoever, and the only upwardly-mobile black people would be those who can entertain us, whether by singing, acting or playing sports. And I'll reiterate: it's not all black people, nor is it even most, but it's still enough to be a noticeable trend.

I agree there is a segment of the black population that looks for government hand outs, just as there is a segment of white, latino, asian, and native americans who do the same thing. But I have to disagree with your presumption that among white people this originates within families but with black people it originates among whole neighborhoods. There are plenty of poor white neighborhoods and communities that receive large amounts of federal benefits. There are also plenty of hard working poor black people who live in impoverished neighborhoods who raise children who don't end up in jail. The rate of black people moving to the middle class has risen substantially since the 1960s even with the introduction of welfare, medicaid, food stamps and other types of programs available. Nearly 50% of black people were on assistance or living in poverty in the mid 1960s it is under 25% now, which is a tremendous gain in such a small amount of time. If your presumption were correct, that whole neighborhoods of black people want to always live off of the government with no exception among individual families, then this rising trend of black wealth would never have occurred. Just like white families, the majority of black parents want the best for their children. I am black, my mom was a teenage mother who had 2 children by the age of 17. She was on welfare and we lived in poverty. She had 4 children by the age of 30 but by that time had gone back to school and was not using any assistance. She raised my brothers and I with the attitude that no one should have to take care of you and you should never want to be on welfare. We all graduated high school, all three of my brothers have never been to jail/prison or in any trouble with the law, none of us were teenage parents, and none of us receive welfare or other benefits currently. According to your presumption I should have been wanting to live off of the government due to my neighborhood, but because of my family (not just my mom, but my dad also as even though they were not married he was and still is a part of my life always) I knew that there were expectations placed on me and the main one was to do well in school (all my brothers and I were honors students) and to not get pregnant at a young age. My family was not unique in black impoverished neighborhoods.
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Old 05-04-2011, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Middletown, Ohio
1,731 posts, read 2,293,478 times
Reputation: 6469
Thumbs up Bravo...Well Said

Quote:
Originally Posted by residinghere2007 View Post
I agree there is a segment of the black population that looks for government hand outs, just as there is a segment of white, latino, asian, and native americans who do the same thing. But I have to disagree with your presumption that among white people this originates within families but with black people it originates among whole neighborhoods. There are plenty of poor white neighborhoods and communities that receive large amounts of federal benefits. There are also plenty of hard working poor black people who live in impoverished neighborhoods who raise children who don't end up in jail. The rate of black people moving to the middle class has risen substantially since the 1960s even with the introduction of welfare, medicaid, food stamps and other types of programs available. Nearly 50% of black people were on assistance or living in poverty in the mid 1960s it is under 25% now, which is a tremendous gain in such a small amount of time. If your presumption were correct, that whole neighborhoods of black people want to always live off of the government with no exception among individual families, then this rising trend of black wealth would never have occurred. Just like white families, the majority of black parents want the best for their children. I am black, my mom was a teenage mother who had 2 children by the age of 17. She was on welfare and we lived in poverty. She had 4 children by the age of 30 but by that time had gone back to school and was not using any assistance. She raised my brothers and I with the attitude that no one should have to take care of you and you should never want to be on welfare. We all graduated high school, all three of my brothers have never been to jail/prison or in any trouble with the law, none of us were teenage parents, and none of us receive welfare or other benefits currently. According to your presumption I should have been wanting to live off of the government due to my neighborhood, but because of my family (not just my mom, but my dad also as even though they were not married he was and still is a part of my life always) I knew that there were expectations placed on me and the main one was to do well in school (all my brothers and I were honors students) and to not get pregnant at a young age. My family was not unique in black impoverished neighborhoods.
I wish I could take this post and make it a sticky somewhere, so that people would know that there are families and individuals, like yourself, that have overcome poverty and adversity and dire circumstances, and have made positive contributions to their communities...as a black man, and as a fellow citizen, you have made me feel very proud this morning

And stuff like this is happening not just in Oklahoma, but all around the country...and it needs to be made known, so that a lot of stereotypes and negativity can be 'washed away', so to speak...thank you so much for sharing your experience, and that of your family
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