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Old 01-07-2016, 11:23 AM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,791,793 times
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I loved Talihina. In fact we loved it so much, we are going to move there onto large acreage. Land is cheap, you can grow your own food, have cattle and horses, you have nearly 2 million acres of national forest to roam, water is plentiful, area is beautiful. All the people we met were nice (not to say they are all nice, we are not naive!). There was apparent poverty but that comes with the rural aspect of the area - drive around New Mexico rural parts and it is all the same. If you are coming from New Hampshire or something, sure - the villages over there may be affluent and clean but most of them are also overrun with people...
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Old 01-11-2016, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Anaheim
1,877 posts, read 3,411,219 times
Reputation: 1215
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
There is a law of math or physics that indicates if one keeps doing the same thing the same way he or she will reap the same result. OK is very much two different states in one big territory. One-half is green with rolling hills and wildlife. The other half is flat, red earth, and oil wells. In between the borders are rivers, large lakes, small towns, some very nice people, Tulsa to the East and the State Capital to the West.

OK is okay. It is filled with the wonders of discovery and te ghosts of history.
Doesn't the western portion end up at over 5,000 feet above sea level? Something more than flat is going on there, albeit gradually so.
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Old 01-11-2016, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Anaheim
1,877 posts, read 3,411,219 times
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Originally Posted by Blue Skies View Post
Pawhuska, Shidler, Fairfax, Ralston - all dying towns, all run down. Poorly educated people. The residents show no pride in their towns. Junk cars in the yards, appliances on the porch, falling down trailer houses, abandoned buildings. Very sad to see these fall into decay.
Is this a backhanded way of disrespecting the Osage tribe? Or are these towns exceptions to the general state of things among the people?

I have only been on tribal lands in Montana and Arizona, and they were decidedly rural, but....
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Old 03-09-2019, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Okmulgee
1 posts, read 148 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Laurie L View Post
So in your opinion Linicx...where would you look? Myself and my fiancee are looking to move to Oklahoma in the spring. We are set on certain counties we have been researching alot! Those counties are Bryan, Choctaw, Love, Marshall, McIntosh and Okmulgee. What are your thoughts and views? We could use all the help we can get! Thanks in advance, Laurie
I just moved to Okmulgee a week ago. so far I love it. Having family here helps and I have visited often. the area is beautiful
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Old 03-10-2019, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,169 posts, read 5,851,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsltd View Post
Doesn't the western portion end up at over 5,000 feet above sea level? Something more than flat is going on there, albeit gradually so.
Yes that's true, and much of western Oklahoma is rolling hills like much of eastern Oklahoma. The difference is there aren't that many trees so the horizon is vast. But you are gradually going up hill going from east to west and from southeast to northwest.

Quote:
Is this a backhanded way of disrespecting the Osage tribe? Or are these towns exceptions to the general state of things among the people?

I have only been on tribal lands in Montana and Arizona, and they were decidedly rural, but....
01-11-2016 10:58 PM
Pawhuska has become a tourist town due to the Pioneer Woman Food lady (Ree Drummond) who has made that place boom.

The other Osage county towns are just suffering the same type of stuff that most rural towns are suffering from. However, although Osage county went through a different process than the other tribal lands in Oklahoma the county is not tribal land anymore. Although the Osage are still significant in the county they are a minority. They are about 15% of the entire county population. While that number is skewed by the portion of the county that is in the Tulsa metro I'd guess excluding that area of Tulsa the native American population in Osage County is around 20-25% at best.

Last edited by eddie gein; 03-10-2019 at 01:05 PM..
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Old 03-12-2019, 08:16 AM
 
640 posts, read 769,560 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsltd View Post
Is this a backhanded way of disrespecting the Osage tribe? Or are these towns exceptions to the general state of things among the people?

I have only been on tribal lands in Montana and Arizona, and they were decidedly rural, but....
Those towns do look rough, and it is a shame. If it were the fault of the Osage tribe, is it disrespectful to notice that?

What I have noticed are the arbitrary speed traps around towns in Osage County. Drive those highways at your own risk, it can quickly cost you $200.

Blackburn is another of those failing old towns.

Last edited by teakboat; 03-12-2019 at 09:05 AM..
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Old 03-12-2019, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,169 posts, read 5,851,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsltd View Post
Doesn't the western portion end up at over 5,000 feet above sea level? Something more than flat is going on there, albeit gradually so.
Quote:
Originally Posted by teakboat View Post
If it were the fault of the Osage tribe, is it disrespectful to notice that?
The difference is that the places he was referencing in Montana and Wyoming are tribal reservations and are anywhere from 50-100% Native Americans.

Osage county is only 15% Native Americans. I don't know if it is "disrespectful" to notice that but it is extremely inaccurate to claim that. The county is mostly poor white people.
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Old Yesterday, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Jenks, Ok
833 posts, read 1,331,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
The county is mostly poor white people.
Most of the people in Osage County live in Tulsa, Sand Springs and Skiatook. Tulsa is the largest city in Osage County, even just the tiny portion of the city of Tulsa in Osage County.
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Old Yesterday, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,169 posts, read 5,851,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swake View Post
Most of the people in Osage County live in Tulsa, Sand Springs and Skiatook. Tulsa is the largest city in Osage County, even just the tiny portion of the city of Tulsa in Osage County.
I addressed that to a degree in post #115.

But to make it more accurate..........

"Most of the people in the cities and towns in rural Osage county are poor white people" and I don't it's a fair comparison to tribal reservations in other states.
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Old Today, 03:19 PM
 
1,279 posts, read 922,888 times
Reputation: 3000
Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
The difference is that the places he was referencing in Montana and Wyoming are tribal reservations and are anywhere from 50-100% Native Americans.

Osage county is only 15% Native Americans. I don't know if it is "disrespectful" to notice that but it is extremely inaccurate to claim that. The county is mostly poor white people.
Are you trying to discredit poor white people? I resemble that remark.
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