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Old 12-13-2011, 01:44 PM
 
75 posts, read 56,913 times
Reputation: 49
Default Where would the most green, lush, and lake areas be in OK?

We are considering a road trip in the spring to OK, we are considering relocating from MI. I am a homeschooling mom/nurse and my husband is in IT.
Someone mentioned to me going from the Great Lakes to OK would be a big change because of lack of lakes there in OK.
Is it really that dry? I am totally looking for less snow and more sun but never being there, I am wondering about the terrain. My husband loves to fish and our family loves to camp, swim and boating.

Of course, I have also heard that the people of OK are very friendly, which is nice to hear.

We are thinking of looking into the Norman/OKC area? Would that be an area with more lakes or rolling hills? Or does Tulsa area fit that criteria a little more?


Last edited by Greengables; 12-13-2011 at 02:07 PM..
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Old 12-13-2011, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Jenks, Ok
555 posts, read 521,812 times
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Northeastern Oklahoma is called Green Country and has lots of large lakes. And with 40+ inches of rain a year it's not that dry either, except in the middle of summer. The stereotypical image of Oklahoma being some near desert like in cowboys movies is way, way off. Look at the photos in the Tulsa section.
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Old 12-14-2011, 03:55 AM
 
Location: Texas
14,023 posts, read 8,875,863 times
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Grand Lake O' The Cherokee's is a treasure, as is Lake Tenkiller farther downstream. Either of those should fit what you're looking for, though that part of Oklahoma is not totally devoid of snow and ice. In fact, none of the state is.

Your best bet for finding "green" lakes and staying away from wintery weather as much as possible would be found in the southeastern corner of the state. It's mountainous, heavily timbered and there are several lakes there, including Hugo Lake, Pine Creek, Sardis Lake, Lake Raymond Gary and Broken Bow lake. The downside is that it's the most economically depressed part of the state and the folks who live there, while friendly enough, are generally distrustful of outsiders. Going off the main routes can be very much like doing the same thing in West Virginia or eastern Kentucky. There are places you're not really welcome. But, once you've convinced them you're no threat to the pot crop they have planted up in the hills, you'll be alright!
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Old 12-14-2011, 04:10 AM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
8,451 posts, read 6,060,771 times
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Oklahoma has more man made lakes than most other states. Open up a map of Oklahoma and you'll see some good sized lakes, like Lake Eufaula, Grand Lake and Keystone for starters. Tulsa is somewhat more hillier and wooded than Oklahoma City and probably closer to more major lakes. However, the drive on the famous Route 66 just to the northeast of Oklahoma City is rather scenic. Oklahoma isn't all that dry, especially, east of I-35 where the biggest lakes tend to be. In fact, in most of the far eastern counties the drought that has been in the news is over now. Some of the most famous pictures of the Dust Bowl were taken in the Oklahoma panhandle, the most remote part of Oklahoma where the climate far from characterizes that found in the two biggest metro areas..

Last edited by StillwaterTownie; 12-14-2011 at 04:20 AM..
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Old 12-14-2011, 07:15 AM
 
702 posts, read 1,535,702 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greengables View Post
We are considering a road trip in the spring to OK, we are considering relocating from MI. I am a homeschooling mom/nurse and my husband is in IT.
Someone mentioned to me going from the Great Lakes to OK would be a big change because of lack of lakes there in OK.
Is it really that dry? I am totally looking for less snow and more sun but never being there, I am wondering about the terrain. My husband loves to fish and our family loves to camp, swim and boating.

Of course, I have also heard that the people of OK are very friendly, which is nice to hear.

We are thinking of looking into the Norman/OKC area? Would that be an area with more lakes or rolling hills? Or does Tulsa area fit that criteria a little more?

WOW, where do people get there information from? Did you realize Oklahoma has more miles of shoreline then any other state?? We have numerous, very large reservoirs and most are in eastern Oklahoma. As previously pointed out, this part of our great state is called Green Country for a reason. Even in the hot portion of the summer we get plenty of rain, thus the green country reference.

You most definitely need to drive through eastern Oklahoma for it's beauty. Start with Grand Lake, down through lake Hudson, further south travel around Tenkiller (absolutely beautiful area!). But please continue on to the SE corner of the state and travel around Broken Bow, arguably the most beautiful area of our state with all the mountains, woods and clear beautiful water!
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Old 12-14-2011, 09:54 AM
 
75 posts, read 56,913 times
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Thanks for the information.

Probably the people telling me OK is mostly flat and brown are people who have never been there. I have never been there and that is why I wanted to get the info from those of you who do

The way you are all describing it is not the way I pictured it. I have looked at maps and pictures and there are many beautiful looking areas. Of course, not ever being there I was trying to figure out how close those areas were to more populated areas such as Tulsa and OKC as needing to work at a hospital would be the area where we would search.

There are beautiful places in Northern MI that are a little more hilly and very beautiful, but there is not much there.

So, I was curious where there are cities/towns with lakes around but within a 30 minute commute to the larger more populated cities. But I think I have a good picture of where to start and some good tips for a road trip route.

Thank you all !
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Old 12-14-2011, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Texas
14,023 posts, read 8,875,863 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greengables View Post
Thanks for the information.

Probably the people telling me OK is mostly flat and brown are people who have never been there. I have never been there and that is why I wanted to get the info from those of you who do

The way you are all describing it is not the way I pictured it. I have looked at maps and pictures and there are many beautiful looking areas. Of course, not ever being there I was trying to figure out how close those areas were to more populated areas such as Tulsa and OKC as needing to work at a hospital would be the area where we would search.

There are beautiful places in Northern MI that are a little more hilly and very beautiful, but there is not much there.

So, I was curious where there are cities/towns with lakes around but within a 30 minute commute to the larger more populated cities. But I think I have a good picture of where to start and some good tips for a road trip route.

Thank you all !
SE Oklahoma is not near major medical centers. There are tiny little hospitals in Hugo, Antlers and, I think, Broken Bow but that's about it. Any larger hospitals would be too far to drive every day. There's McAlester with a community hospital and a large Indian hospital, but you could be looking at a hundred mile commute. Any others are in neighboring states, such as at Mena, AR or Paris, TX.

Lake Texoma, on the Texas border, isn't all that green (it's not brown and flat either) but there are major medical centers all around it in both Oklahoma and Texas. And, Durant in Bryan County, is one of the fastest growing regions in the country.
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Old 12-21-2011, 05:34 PM
 
3 posts, read 3,551 times
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Since you are coming down here for a drive, you really should check out the SE part of the state. It has the Talimena Drive, going from U.S. 259 to U.S. 271, with many absolutely breathtaking views of the Kiamichi and Jack Fork mountains. Down in the far SE corner is Broken Bow Lake, Stephens Gap, and Beavers Bend State Park. Stunningly beautiful!
It is the poorest part of the state, though, and there are no big hospitals around. But there are getting to be more and more smaller regional hospitals, many of them operated by the various Indian tribes. Your husband might be able to get a job with one of them.
Oklahoma terrain is the most "differentiated" in the country. Timbered mountains in the Southeast, rolling plains and hills in the middle, and "wide open" spaces reminiscent of the Old West up in the Panhandle.
If you're looking for camping, fishing, swimming, and boating, the southeastern (best), eastern, or southern part of the state is what you're looking for. Good Luck.
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Old 12-22-2011, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Norman
81 posts, read 112,902 times
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Go east of I-35.
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Old 12-22-2011, 10:48 AM
 
75 posts, read 56,913 times
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Thanks grippybutt

We are looking into OK and ID. Yes, two very different states. Still planning our road trip to OK and all the info has been very helpful.


Thanks everyone
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