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Old 05-13-2015, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Pawnee Nation
7,525 posts, read 15,421,714 times
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Travel OK

#1 - Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge
With over 59,000 acres of ancient mountains dotting a sea of prairie, the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge in Lawton is home to free-range American bison herds, prairie dogs, Texas Longhorn cattle, bobcats and coyotes. The crowning jewel of the park is Mount Scott. From the top you can marvel at the patchwork of lakes, stunning rock formations and miles of picturesque hiking trails.

#2 - Quartz Mountain Resort
Nestled between the shores of Lake Altus-Lugert and the Wichita Mountains, Quartz Mountain Resort is the ideal setting for quiet reflection and solitude, family fun or a romantic retreat. The lake glimmers in the sun and moonlight and the stars shine as brightly as any place in Oklahoma. With the resort’s authentic lodge furnishings and delectable restaurant menu, guests can snuggle in for a memorable stay.

#3 - Chickasaw National Recreation Area
One hundred years ago, American Indians called it the "Peaceful Valley of Rippling Waters" and the Chickasaw National Recreation Area in Sulphur continues to offer precious serenity to visitors. Travertine Creek meanders throughout much of the park and the babbling water is the perfect soundtrack for recreation. From hiking to swimming, camping to picnicking or fishing to wildlife viewing, you are sure to find what best feeds your soul

#4 - Beavers Bend & Hochatown State Park
Imagine mountains of fragrant pine forests intermingled with colorful hardwood trees and you’ve found Beavers Bend & Hochatown State Park near Broken Bow. The Mountain Fork River provides clear, cool waters for excellent fishing year-round. A dream-like mist rising from Broken Bow Lake is the perfect vista while enjoying a morning cup of coffee at Lakeview Lodge.

#5 - Natural Falls State Park
Beauty often makes you quickly draw in your breath in wonder and Natural Falls State Park is no different; but what it also provides its visitors is a place to exhale. At this quiet oasis in northeastern Oklahoma, a 77-foot waterfall invites visitors to hike down the rugged trails to an enchanting basin pool. Seventeen different fern varieties thrive in the wet kiss of the cascades. Once at the base of the falls, you can drink in the tranquility of the little valley and surround yourself with native flowering trees like the redbud and the luminous dogwood. Camping and hiking are the most popular forms of activity in the park but a book read at the base of the falls on a sunny, summer afternoon could be the most soothing.

#6 - Talimena National Scenic Byway
The Ouachita National Forest in southeast Oklahoma loves to show off its colors. The Talimena National Scenic Byway has become one of the most popular destinations for fall foliage tours in the region. At each scenic turnout along the way, the vibrant colors on the mountainsides are breathtaking and almost unbelievable in their brilliance.

#7 - Grand Lake of the Cherokees
The result of the Pensacola Dam project completed in 1940, Grand Lake O' the Cherokees is one of Oklahoma’s most popular lake destinations. With 1,300 miles of scenic shoreline, bordered by five state parks, the Grand Lake Area is an outdoorsman’s delight. This serpentine gem glitters and shimmers in the summer sunlight between rolling green hills that beg you to slow down and just and enjoy the view.

#8 - Glover River
The last major free-flowing river unencumbered by dams or water releases, the Glover River offers secluded beauty unmatched in the state. Canoeing and small mouth bass fishing are popular on this gorgeous waterway. The fact that the river is still un-commercialized lures the most experienced adventurer to this best kept secret in southeast Oklahoma.

#9 - Black Mesa Area
Located in the farthest northwest corner of Oklahoma, the panhandle area is the epitome of stark beauty. The Black Mesa plateau is Oklahoma’s highest point at 4,973 feet and rewards hikers with a rare view of a tri-state area. The nearby Black Mesa State Park and Nature Preserve feature amazing watchable wildlife including golden eagle, black bear and bighorn sheep. In the amazing solitude of this scenic area, the wide open spaces dotted with blue sage evoke visions of cowboys on horseback and the prehistoric creatures that used to call this area home.

#10 - Robbers Cave State Park
Climb the steep sandstone bluffs and pretend that you’re an outlaw on the run with Jesse James at Robbers Cave State Park. The Belle Starr View Lodge gives each guest a panoramic view of the lakes and forest that lay hundreds of feet below. As a popular destination for equestrians, the best view of all might just come from the top of a horse.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
10,438 posts, read 7,714,365 times
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List is fine. I would dispute the order.
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Old 05-15-2015, 06:06 AM
 
Location: SW OK (AZ Native)
19,364 posts, read 8,641,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
List is fine. I would dispute the order.
Agreed, might swap #2 with #6. But the list is appropriate and represents all the corners of the state.
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Old 05-15-2015, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
20,530 posts, read 15,249,713 times
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The Glass Mountains should be at least no. 11.
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Old 05-15-2015, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 27,185,539 times
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OK is one of two unique American states. To me it is a bit of a true living Feng Shui from its mountain and scenery, to its large scenic lakes, to its beautiful botanical gardens. One of the most unusual is the Lendonwood Garden at Grove where Asian plants, that are normally found only in the Pacific Northwest or Japan, grow happily not far from the Koi pond, the wooden footbridge, and the Tea House.
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Old 05-17-2015, 09:25 AM
 
Location: USA
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Glover River is the only place I've never heard of. I see it's in SE Oklahoma. What sets it apart from other rivers?
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Old 05-17-2015, 10:59 AM
 
191 posts, read 175,896 times
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Rubi

Glover river is supposed to be the only river in OK that doesn't have a dam on it. I think it's a pretty stream, but not that much better than the Mountain Fork, or even the Illinois as it was before everybody and their pet dog built a cabin or a canoe concession.

For most beautiful, I's put my money on Cucumber Creek, a tributary to the Mt. Fork. I would also consider the Heavener Rune Stone state park; even without the Rune stone, that is a mighty pretty spot.
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Old 05-17-2015, 11:54 AM
 
Location: USA
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Thanks, Skip, your logical explanatory posts are always appreciated.
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Old 05-18-2015, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK
2,572 posts, read 3,717,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skip OK View Post
Rubi

Glover river is supposed to be the only river in OK that doesn't have a dam on it. I think it's a pretty stream, but not that much better than the Mountain Fork, or even the Illinois as it was before everybody and their pet dog built a cabin or a canoe concession.

For most beautiful, I's put my money on Cucumber Creek, a tributary to the Mt. Fork. I would also consider the Heavener Rune Stone state park; even without the Rune stone, that is a mighty pretty spot.
That list just goes to show the diversity of our beautiful state. We really don't have much that is grand, our mountains are not like you find out west, but we have some. We also have forest, lakes, rivers, canyons, mesas, swamps and wetlands and many more.

From Tulsa or OKC there are tons of places you can drive to in less than two hours that are dramatically different than where you started. I had been living in Pennsylvania, upstate New York and West Virginia off and on for the last 10'years. Even though this area is very beautiful it all looked the same. Cherokee Country looks dramatically different than its neighbor Wagoner county. Comanche looks dramatically different than its neighbor Stephens County. I think we all know how diverse our state is but outsiders think we are flat dusty plain. If you google ugly states you will be shocked at how many sites says Oklahoma is in the top ten for being ugly. It just goes to show the author of that site has never been to our state and is using old tired stereotypes, like the dustbowl and old oil fields, to draw conclusions.
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Old 05-19-2015, 07:12 AM
 
Location: USA
7,778 posts, read 10,791,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by okie1962 View Post
That list just goes to show the diversity of our beautiful state. We really don't have much that is grand, our mountains are not like you find out west, but we have some. We also have forest, lakes, rivers, canyons, mesas, swamps and wetlands and many more.

From Tulsa or OKC there are tons of places you can drive to in less than two hours that are dramatically different than where you started. I had been living in Pennsylvania, upstate New York and West Virginia off and on for the last 10'years. Even though this area is very beautiful it all looked the same. Cherokee Country looks dramatically different than its neighbor Wagoner county. Comanche looks dramatically different than its neighbor Stephens County. I think we all know how diverse our state is but outsiders think we are flat dusty plain. If you google ugly states you will be shocked at how many sites says Oklahoma is in the top ten for being ugly. It just goes to show the author of that site has never been to our state and is using old tired stereotypes, like the dustbowl and old oil fields, to draw conclusions.
Okie, your interesting post reminds me of when my granddaughter moved from Mustang, on the west side of Oklahoma City to Choctaw, on the east side. She noticed the bugs in Choctaw were different from the bugs in Mustang.
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