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Old 05-08-2008, 10:19 PM
 
Location: In My Own Little World. . .
3,238 posts, read 8,207,746 times
Reputation: 1609

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nameless View Post
I really have no clue to be honest, it's just always been that way around here. I didn't know it was so weird until I heard that it was odd.
Let's put it this way. I've lived in NJ, GA, AZ, CO, CA and NV. I've never heard of having graduation before finals except for here in OK. I thought it was unique to Mustang because of maybe a scheduling problem or something, but I guess it's something that's done all around here. Do you have any idea why Nameless?
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Old 05-08-2008, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Land of chicken fry & fried okra
21 posts, read 64,735 times
Reputation: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkfarnam View Post
RubyLee wrote:


Welcome to the forum. I'm afraid that I'll have to disagree with you on one thing.

That is,,,,,,,Wisconsin and Illinois are North Eastern states. They are both North east of Ok, so if OK. isn't a Midwest state how can they be?

And I'm also afraid that the Bible Belt didn't cover all southern states. The ones you discribed as "Cotton States" Georgia, Texas, Mississippi,Alabama. Arkansas are in "The Cotton Belt" AKA "The Old South".

The Bible Belt


The Old South the darkest Is "The Cotten Belt"
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/a6/US_map-Deep_South_States.png/300px-US_map-Deep_South_States.png (broken link)
First of all, the map of the Bible Belt at the top clearly shows that all those states in red are Southern states and Oklahoma happens to be in the red portion. Arkansas was never a cotton state as the map clearly shows, its not even colored. Arkansas is right next to Oklahoma.

The Midwestern United States (or Midwest) refers to the north-central states of the United States of America, specifically Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.

My husband is from Wisconsin. He has family in Illinois and Minnesota as well. I even work with people from Ohio that represent themselves as Midwesterners. They all laugh when they hear people call Oklahoma the Midwest. Everyone I've met from these states say they are Midwestern. I'm not anyone to argue with them and tell them different. I think they would know if they are from there.




Last edited by Ruby Lee; 05-08-2008 at 11:03 PM.. Reason: Photo didn't come out
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Old 05-08-2008, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Land of chicken fry & fried okra
21 posts, read 64,735 times
Reputation: 18
Smile Thanks to everyone for the welcome

Quote:
Originally Posted by mkfarnam View Post
RubyLee wrote:


Welcome to the forum. I'm afraid that I'll have to disagree with you on one thing.

Thanks. I'm having fun. I like that this forum can keep up with me.
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Old 05-08-2008, 11:27 PM
 
7 posts, read 25,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaseySimplified View Post
Thanks for that post Ruby Lee. Nice to learn more about the state I'll be spending the next four years in!

So I just wanted to give an update to everyone. First off Prom was good and I'm still alive. At the same time I'm glad it's over. It was a lot of work and it's one less thing to worry about before graduation. Also I am really excited to be in Oklahoma this Saturday! I can not wait to experience everything that I have been reading on this forum first hand. Not much else going on in this department. I officially have 7 actual days of school until I am done with high school! Really exciting news! But I guess I should sign off and get started on some homework. (For some reason teachers still deem it necessary to give seniors homework...)

Take care everyone!

Casey
lol oh hi. ive been here(first time) since yesterday and till monday morning. im really liking it out here. im actually a possible transfer student, havent enrolled yet.
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Old 05-08-2008, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 17,584,559 times
Reputation: 4611
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruby Lee View Post
First of all, the map of the Bible Belt at the top clearly shows that all those states in red are Southern states and Oklahoma happens to be in the red portion. Arkansas was never a cotton state as the map clearly shows, its not even colored. Arkansas is right next to Oklahoma.

The Midwestern United States (or Midwest) refers to the north-central states of the United States of America, specifically Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.

My husband is from Wisconsin. He has family in Illinois and Minnesota as well. I even work with people from Ohio that represent themselves as Midwesterners. They all laugh when they hear people call Oklahoma the Midwest. Everyone I've met from these states say they are Midwestern. I'm not anyone to argue with them and tell them different. I think they would know if they are from there.



Ya' come to the right place, you live in OK.?

It say's right on it "East North Central"
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Old 05-08-2008, 11:53 PM
 
Location: Land of chicken fry & fried okra
21 posts, read 64,735 times
Reputation: 18
Smile History of the term "Midwest"

Here ya go folks. This is copy and pasted from Wikipedia

History of the term "Midwest"

The term "Middle West" originated in the 19th century, followed by "Midwest." The heart of the Midwest is bounded by Great Lakes and the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys, the "Old Northwest" (or the "West"), an area that comprised the original Northwest Territory. This area is now called the "East North Central States" by the United States Census Bureau and the "Great Lakes" region by its inhabitants.

The Northwest Territory was created out of the ceded English (formerly French and Native American) frontier lands under the Northwest Ordinance by the Continental Congress just before the U.S. Constitution was ratified. The Northwest Ordinance prohibited slavery and religious discrimination, and promoted public schools and private property, but did not apply after the territories became states. The Northwest Ordinance also specified that the land be surveyed and sold in the rectangular grids of the Public Land Survey System, which was first used in Ohio. The effect of this grid system can be seen throughout the Midwest in such things as county shapes and road networks.
In contrast, land in Kentucky and Tennessee was surveyed and sold using. As Revolutionary War soldiers were awarded lands in Ohio and migrated there and to other Midwestern states with other pioneers, the area became the first thoroughly "American" region. Frederick Jackson Turner celebrated its frontier for shaping the national character of individualism and democracy.

The Midwest region today sometimes refers not only to states created from the Northwest Ordinance, but also may include states between the Appalachian Mountains and the Rocky Mountains and north of the Ohio River. In all, 12 states are covered by The American Midwest: An Interpretive Encyclopedia(2006).

The term "West" was applied to the region in the early years of the country. Later, the region west of the Appalachians was divided into the Far West the West, and the Middle West. Some parts of the Midwest have also been referred to as Northwest for historical reasons (for instance, this explains the Minnesota-based Northwest Airlines as well as Northwestern University in Illinois), so the current Northwest region of the country is called the Pacific Northwest to make a clear distinction.

The boundaries of what is considered the Midwest today are somewhat ambiguous. People from across the region consider themselves to be from the Midwest for very different reasons and have varying definitions and perceptions of the Midwest, and use has changed historically, gradually growing westward to include states which formerly were thought of as being the "West." Because the Northwest Territory lay between the East Coast and the then-far-West, the states carved out of it were called the "Northwest" in 1789, and "Middle West" (Middlewest, Middle-West) by 1898.
In the early 19th century, anything west of the Mississippi River was considered the West, and the Midwest was the region west of the Appalachians and east of the Mississippi. In time, some users began to include Minnesota, Iowa and Missouri, and with the settlement of the western prairie, a new term, "Great Plains States," was used for the row of states from North Dakota to Kansas. Later, these states annexed themselves unofficially to the Midwest. Today, the term "Far West" means the West Coast, and people as far west as the prairie sections of Colorado, Wyoming and Montana sometimes identify themselves with the term Midwest.


Culture


[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:2004-07-14_2600x1500_chicago_lake_skyline.jpg]Chicago is the largest city in the Midwest


[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ImageetroitSkyline.jpg"]Detroit is the busiest commercial border crossing in North America.


[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imageowntown_indy_from_parking_garage_zoom.JPG"]Indianapolis is the third largest city in the Midwest




Midwesterners are alternately viewed as open, friendly, and straightforward, or sometimes stereotyped as unsophisticated and stubborn. Factors that probably affected the shaping of Midwest values include the religious heritage of the abolitionist, pro-education Congregationalists to the stalwart Calvinist heritage of the Midwestern Protestants, as well as the agricultural values inculcated by the hardy pioneers who settled the area. The Midwest remains a melting pot of Protestantism and Calvinism, mistrustful of authority and power.

Roman Catholicism is the largest single religious denomination in the Midwest, varying between 19 and 29% of the state populations. Baptists compose 14% of the populations of Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan, up to 22% in Missouri and down to 5% in Minnesota. Lutherans peak at 22-24% in Wisconsin and Minnesota, reflecting the Scandinavian and German heritage of those states as parodied humorously by Garrison Keillor in his Prairie Home Companion. Pentecostal and charismatic denominations have few adherents in the Midwest, ranging between 1 and 7% (although the Assembly of God began in lower Missouri .Judaism and Islam are each practiced by 1% or less of the population, with higher concentrations in major urban areas, such as, Indianapolis, St. Louis, Minneapolis, Detroit and Cleveland . Those with no religious affiliation make up 13-16% of the Midwest's population.

The rural heritage of the land in the Midwest remains widely held, even if industrialization and suburbanization have overtaken the states in the original Northwest Territory. Given the rural, antebellum associations with the Midwest, further rural states like Kansas have become icons of Midwesternism, most directly with the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz.

Midwestern politics tends to be cautious, but the caution is sometimes peppered with protest, especially in minority communities or those associated with agrarian, labor or populist roots. This was especially true in the early 20th century when Milwaukee was a hub of the socialist movement in the United States, electing three socialist mayors and the only socialist congressional representative (Victor Berger) during that time. The metropolis-strewn Great Lakes region tends to be the most liberal area of the Midwest, and liberal presence diminishes gradually as you move south and west from that region into the less-populated rural areas. The Great Lakes region has spawned people such as the La Follette political family, labor leader and five-time Socialist Party of America presidential candidate Eugene Debs, and Communist Party leader Gus Hall. Minnesota in particular has produced liberal national politicians Paul Wellstone, Walter Mondale, Eugene McCarthy, and Hubert Humphrey as well as protest musician Bob Dylan.

Because of 20th century African American migration from the South, a large African American urban population lives in most of the regions' major cities, although the concentration is not generally as large as that of the Southern United States. The combination of industry and cultures, Jazz, Blues, and Rock and Roll, led to an outpouring of musical creativity in the 20th century in the Midwest, including new music like the Motown Sound and technofrom Detroit and house music & the blues from Chicago. Rock and Roll music was first identified as a new genre by a Cleveland radio DJ, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is now located in Cleveland. See also Music of the Midwest Motown, Detroit, 70s Soul Music, Ohio Players, Kool and The Gang, and Dayton. Today the population of the Midwest is 65,971,974, or 22.2% of the total population of the United States.

Cultural overlap with neighboring regions

Differences in the definition of the Midwest mainly split between the Heartland Great Plains on one side, and the Great Lakes and the Rust Belt on the other. While some point to the small towns and agricultural communities in Kansas, Iowa, the Dakotas and Nebraska of the Great Plains as representative of traditional Midwestern lifestyles and values, others would assert that the declining Rust Belt cities of the Great Lakes, with their histories of 19th- and early-20th century immigration, manufacturing base, and strong Catholic influence, are more representative of the Midwestern experience. Under such a definition, cities as far east as Buffalo, New York and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania may be considered Midwestern in nature.

Certain areas of the traditionally defined Midwest are often cited as not being representative of the 'Midwest,' while other areas traditionally outside of the Midwest are often claimed to be part of the Midwest. These claims often embody historical, cultural, economic or demographic arguments for inclusion or exclusion.
Two other important regions, Appalachia and the Ozark Mountains, overlap with the Midwest, Appalachia in Southern Ohio and the Ozarks in Southern Missouri. The Ohio River has long been the boundary between North and South, and between the Midwest and the Upper South. All the lower Midwestern states, including Missouri, have a major Southern component, but only Missouri was a slave state before the Civil War.

In addition, parts of the Northeastern states have a Midwestern feel. Western Pennsylvania, which contains the cities of Erie and Pittsburgh, shares culture, history, and identity with the "Midwest," but overlaps with Appalachia as well.citation needed Buffalo, New York, the western terminus of the Erie Canal and gateway to the Great Lakes, also offers a Midwestern orientation, and in most instances its residents identify more readily with the cultures of ChicagoDetroit than cities on the Eastern Seaboard. However, residents of Western Pennsylvania and Western New York rarely, if ever, consider themselves Midwesterners.

The prairie parts of Montana, Wyoming, and especially Colorado are sometimes considered part of the Midwest, especially to people in the Great Plains which are closer to the geographic middle of the country.citation needed However, such an inclusion would be considered incorrect to most people in the Great Lakes region as many people near the Great Lakes do not even consider the Plains states to be the Midwest, as much of those states are ranchland.

Oklahoma is sometimes thought of as being a Midwestern state, though it is always identified as a South Central state. Eastern Oklahoma is decidedly "Southern" in its cultural history and its connection to the oil business and other Southern industries, having much in common with nearby Arkansas and eastern Texas. However, western and central Oklahoma (excluding the Oklahoma City area) and the upper Texas Panhandle (generally the part of Texas north of and including Amarillo, Texas), by contrast, generally have more in common economically, climatically, and culturally with the states of Kansas and Nebraska and the eastern part of Colorado than with most of the American South or Southwest. citation needed These areas may have been under nominal control of the Confederate States of America but were thinly populated during the Civil War, and were settled largely by people from the Midwest and rely heavily upon ranching and wheat-growing instead of cotton and lumbering for their agricultural production which so clearly mark the American South.

Kentucky is also sometimes considered Midwestern,reflecting its heritage as a border state between the Southeast and Midwest that remained in the Union during the Civil War; however, the state is defined as Southern by the US Census Bureau and many would argue that its culture, especially in rural areas, remains distinctly Southern. Due to significant corn and grain production, much of the state forms part of the American agricultural core, or Corn Belt, along with states like Illinois, Indiana and Iowa. Several regions along the northern border with the Ohio River, especially in the industrial and urbanized Louisville and Northern Kentucky areas, saw significant levels of German immigration in the 19th century, as did most other Midwestern states. Industrial regions in north Kentucky, such as Louisville, have also experienced population and employment declines that have led to their being viewed as part of the Rust Belt region.

The four Northern Panhandle counties of West Virginia could also be considered part of the Midwest, due to their location north of the Mason-Dixon Line extension (Wetzel Marshall county border). Also, cities such as Wheeling and Weirton have experienced a dramatic population decrease due to their Rust Belt economies; this is in common with the Midwest. The other 51 counties of the state are generally located within the Upper South region, which is in keeping with the U.S. Census Bureau's definition of all of West Virginia as a South Atlantic state.



Linguistic characteristics
Main articles: Inland Northern American English, North Central American English, and Yooper dialect

The accents of the region are generally distinct from those of the South and many urban areas of the American Northeast. The accent considered characteristic of most of the Midwest is considered by many to be "standard" American English. This accent is preferred by many national radio and television broadcasters, who go so far as to actually have potential broadcasters receive training in speaking "Midwestern."citation needed

This may have started because many prominent broadcast personalities — such as Walter Cronkite, Johnny CarsonDavid Letterman, Tom Brokaw, John Madden and Casey Kasem — came from this region and so created this perception. More recently, a National Geographic magazine article (Nov. 1998) attributed the high number of telemarketing firms in Omaha, Nebraska, due to the "neutral accents" of the area's inhabitants.
However, many Midwestern cities are now undergoing the Northern Cities Shift away from the perceived standard accent.

In some regions, particularly the farther north into the Upper Midwest one goes, a definite accent is sometimes detectable, usually reflecting the heritage of the area. For example, Minnesota, western Wisconsin and Michigan's Upper Peninsula have strong Scandinavian accents, which intensify the farther north one goes. Many parts of western Michigan have noticeable Dutch-flavored accent. Many areas close to the Canadian border share similar accent traits as Canadians, sounding extremely similar (most notably pronunciation of words such as "about" as "aboat" in Michigan). This is partly due to the constant flow of citizens between these areas due to close business/commercial ties (Michigan & Ontario in particular).

Also, residents of Chicago are recognized to have their own distinctive nasal accent (the Chicago bark), with a similar accent occurring in parts of Wisconsin, Michigan, Northern Indiana, Cleveland, and Western New York State. Arguably, this may have been derived from heavy Irish, German, Polish, and Eastern European influences in the Great Lakes Region. The most southern parts of the Midwest, generally south of U.S. Route 50, show distinctly southern speech patterns.

Last edited by Ruby Lee; 05-09-2008 at 12:38 AM.. Reason: Didn't show up
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Old 05-09-2008, 12:47 AM
 
Location: Land of chicken fry & fried okra
21 posts, read 64,735 times
Reputation: 18
Smile Midwestern States

Quote:
Originally Posted by mkfarnam View Post
Ya' come to the right place, you live in OK.?

It say's right on it "East North Central"
Yes it does. It is the East North Central part of the MIDWEST. The map clearly shows the states that are in the Midwest.
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Old 05-09-2008, 03:38 AM
 
Location: Land of chicken fry & fried okra
21 posts, read 64,735 times
Reputation: 18
Smile Eskimo Joe's & Walmart

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaseySimplified View Post
I'm thinking that the OSU atmosphere will be better then the SDSU atmosphere, different but better. (even though I haven't been to either one yet) My friends and family think I'm crazy for wanting to go to OSU instead of San Diego but I think it will be an enlightening experience. I think I could do the whole "Simple Life" type of thing. Making my own fun and appreciated the simple things in life. Instead of worrying if I'm wearing the right clothing and driving the right car which is what I'm sure would happen at SDSU to some degree, I could be having fun at football games and enjoying the great outdoors. I'm not saying everyone in Southern California or San Diego or SDSU are like that but I've been in touch with one girl that lives in Los Angeles and is going to SDSU next year. She's a sweet girl but very superficial. I would so rather go for the nice welcoming southern hospitality and the "yall come back now ya hear" rather then the "Oh my god you're wearing clothes from Wal-Mart!?" or "My daddy bought me a BMW. What type of car do you have Casey?" (sorry I know I'm probably stereotyping but its making me laugh). While doing my research on OSU and Oklahoma (and when I say "research" I mean just googling OSU, Oklahoma etc.) I have come across Eskimo Joe's. What is it? Is it just a restaurant or something more? Also what's the strip? I assume its something to the degree of the Las Vegas strip but Oklahoma style. (without all the prostitutes and casinos probably). Maybe I'm the only one but I can't wait to get out of high school and live on my own, go to OSU and start college. I've out grown high school and want to get out of Maryland!

And yes Maryland prides itself on it's excellence sea food!! (the crabs here are to die for!) And I'm not talking about the crab cakes (even though they are good) I'm talking about the full huge crabs that you take and break all there little legs off and eat the insides! Yum!! Now I want some crabs...

Casey
There are Walmarts all over Oklahoma and there is nothing wrong with wearing Walmart clothes. In my personal opinion you can find cute clothes there.

Eskimo Joe's you have to go to. You can't be in Stillwater without going there. They have tasty burgers. Also Ranch Burgers is delicious too. Thats in Pawnee about 20 min from Stillwater. Just be ready for the scorching heat in the summer.
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Old 05-09-2008, 07:17 AM
 
32,837 posts, read 18,604,343 times
Reputation: 35589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruby Lee View Post
Roman Catholicism is the largest single religious denomination in the Midwest, varying between 19 and 29% of the state populations. Baptists compose 14% of the populations of Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan, up to 22% in Missouri and down to 5% in Minnesota. [color=#0000ff].
Nice posts Ruby Lee, and welcome to the okie forums.

There aren't too many Roman Catholics in our neck of the woods. This is Baptist country. So wiki must've gotten it right. OK is NOT a midwestern state.

Personally, I don't think we fall into any of the categories. We fall into the Okie category, just as Texas has its own distinct persona, so do we.
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Old 05-09-2008, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Pawnee Nation
7,525 posts, read 15,516,150 times
Reputation: 7054
When will folks learn? When all the rest of the country was being divided into these regional groups, Oklahoma was a dumping ground. All the nations whose land was being stolen were relocated (dumped) into an area unclaimed by either Texas, Kansas, Arkansas, or any other place. We were rejected by the southern states. We were rejected by the midwestern states. We were the Indian Nations. When they finally decided to make us a state, they included "No Man's Land" as part of the lands the Five Civilized Tribes wanted to call the State of Sequoya.

We are NOT southern, midwestern, eastern, western or any derivative of any of those. We are Oklahoma, a combination of the Indian Nations and No Man's Land, and those clowns who make up the maps can draw all they want......but until they come experience us, they don't know squat.
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