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Old 05-19-2011, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Colorado
315 posts, read 185,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lostnebraskan View Post
I thought they did away with school choice in 2000? Remember, I no longer live in Omaha, so I am probably misinformed lol. But I remember that, my senior year, they stopped busing the North O kids to Burke because they said that you now "go to the school you live near." I was under the impression that they have a closed district in OPS.

Glad you brought this particular thing up, OP.

I know that you have to live in the Ralston/Papillipon/La Vista/Westside districts to go to their respective schools, but is OPS open?
It looks to me (as an outsider) that the magnet program replaced the integration and bussing efforts. Quite a few of the magnet programs are located at schools in more disadvantaged areas, and with lower overall test scores.

What I haven't been able to gather is how well it's been received, or to hear any specific examples of people sending their kids through the program. I've heard a little bit about the North HS program, but virtually nothing about the elementary or middle schools.

In the county we live in now, the Science and Technology magnet is located at the high school that would otherwise have the lowest scores, being in the lowest income area. The program is generally well-respected, and people across the county (that I've spoken to, anyway) are very happy to send their kids there.
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Old 05-19-2011, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Well the thing with IB schools is that they are everywhere across the wcorld. The IB counselor at our school has worked at IB schools is Saudi Arabia and the UAE from what I remember from a few conversations, but I think hes worked in 22 different countries for IB, so finding an abroad school is no problem. And I know someone who studied abroad in Italy at an IB school just this year.
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Old 05-19-2011, 05:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raphael07 View Post
Well the thing with IB schools is that they are everywhere across the wcorld. The IB counselor at our school has worked at IB schools is Saudi Arabia and the UAE from what I remember from a few conversations, but I think hes worked in 22 different countries for IB, so finding an abroad school is no problem. And I know someone who studied abroad in Italy at an IB school just this year.
Charlotte, I'll defer to Raphael's response.

I'm guessing you do need to complete the full HS requirement to earn the certification (my kids are still little, too, so I haven't thought that far either ), but if they were to study abroad, I think we'd just focus on finding another IB school.

Raphael, are you in the program? Either way (in it or not), I'd love to hear your thoughts.
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Old 05-19-2011, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,298 posts, read 5,924,956 times
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I was but dropped from it this year. I loved how the program made us think about the interconnectedness of the world and made us ask "Why?" But as the Diploma Programme (Grades 11-12) started to come closer it began to annoy me because of how controlling it is in what classes you could take. So I decided not to pursue that and I'm instead going to do all of the AP classes in areas that interest me. The IB DP program is great if you are a balanced student, which for the most part I am except my deep hatred of math, and it really encourages you to think of the world around you and to serve and give back to your community.

So in short, good program? Definitely. For me personally? No.
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Old 05-19-2011, 08:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raphael07 View Post
I was but dropped from it this year. I loved how the program made us think about the interconnectedness of the world and made us ask "Why?" But as the Diploma Programme (Grades 11-12) started to come closer it began to annoy me because of how controlling it is in what classes you could take. So I decided not to pursue that and I'm instead going to do all of the AP classes in areas that interest me. The IB DP program is great if you are a balanced student, which for the most part I am except my deep hatred of math, and it really encourages you to think of the world around you and to serve and give back to your community.

So in short, good program? Definitely. For me personally? No.
Thanks for your thoughts, Raphael. I'm glad to hear that you enjoyed it -- and I also think it's pretty cool that you know yourself well enough to follow your own pursuits. I'm sure you'll do fabulously however you head forward.

Had you been in the IB program for a while? Is it weird (either academically, or socially) to come into it if you haven't been in it since elementary school? We aren't living in the right district right now, but we are thinking about buying there expressly for that reason. Ideally for us, though, we'd wait a few more years before doing that. I'm just wondering if that will in any way put my girls at a disadvantage.

Thanks so much for your thoughts!
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Old 05-20-2011, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Colorado
315 posts, read 185,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raphael07 View Post
Well the thing with IB schools is that they are everywhere across the wcorld. The IB counselor at our school has worked at IB schools is Saudi Arabia and the UAE from what I remember from a few conversations, but I think hes worked in 22 different countries for IB, so finding an abroad school is no problem. And I know someone who studied abroad in Italy at an IB school just this year.

Right, I understand that, but when doing some study abroad programs, say, Rotary, you don't always have a choice in what high school you attend. In that case, you'd have to drop from the program, right? But it sounds like IB facilitates study abroad programs, themselves? That I wasn't aware of.

Don't get me wrong, I'm very interested in it and in the idea. I just wouldn't want our study abroad options limited by it.
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Old 05-20-2011, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Colorado
315 posts, read 185,548 times
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Originally Posted by mctex View Post
Had you been in the IB program for a while? Is it weird (either academically, or socially) to come into it if you haven't been in it since elementary school? We aren't living in the right district right now, but we are thinking about buying there expressly for that reason. Ideally for us, though, we'd wait a few more years before doing that. I'm just wondering if that will in any way put my girls at a disadvantage.
FWIW, most schools around here that offer IB are high school only. From my research, it looks like middle and elementary programs are much more rare. And considering that IB HS is some ten years older than elementary, I'd hazard a guess that it was designed to work well on its own.
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Old 05-20-2011, 07:37 AM
 
24 posts, read 14,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlotteRJ View Post
FWIW, most schools around here that offer IB are high school only. From my research, it looks like middle and elementary programs are much more rare. And considering that IB HS is some ten years older than elementary, I'd hazard a guess that it was designed to work well on its own.
In Omaha, for IB, you have one choice -- the Millard North program.

It starts at Aldrich Elementary (156th & Dodge), then goes through Middle North Middle School and Millard North High School.

Ideally, we'd leave them where they are through elementary (not at Aldrich), and then start them in the IB program in middle school. One issue I'm already aware of is Spanish -- the kids that have come up through the elementary program will have had Spanish for 6 years.

My biggest concerns are actually social. Jr high is such an awkward age socially, especially for girls, and I'd hate to dump them into something where all of the other kids had already been together for 6 years.

I tend to over-think things, though. I wouldn't have predicted 2 years ago that I'd be living in Omaha now -- so who knows what the future will bring!
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Old 05-20-2011, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Colorado
315 posts, read 185,548 times
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Is the IB program at the middle and high school closed to kids who didn’t go through the Aldrich program? I guess I was assuming that somebody could go to any one of the schools that feeds into Millard Middle and then enter the program there. So you’d have a lot of kids dropping into the program at the same time, not just your girls. But if you have to be at Aldrich to proceed, that’d be nice to know.

Heh, I’m with you, I over think plenty of things too. Consider yourself lucky in that you’ve settled on IB as the best, must-have education for your kids. I still believe there are many paths to a whole person education.

If nothing else, though, this conversation has gotten me to look more closely at Millard offerings. And with housing prices being cheaper out there, there are some tempting pickings.
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Old 05-20-2011, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Colorado
315 posts, read 185,548 times
Reputation: 252
Oh, and you could solve the Spanish problem by letting the girls take French, German, Japanese, or Latin instead in Middle school. Or is Spanish a required language for IB Middle? We're starting the boys on French early on our own, since we both speak it. There are also some great homeschooling language programs out there if you were willing to do the Spanish on your own - you don't need to know the language yourself. I have a friend who is teaching her six year old on Latin, and they're learning it together.

No advice on the socially awkward years. Though I'd hope that IB students are open minded enough to handle new kids in the class!
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