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Old 09-08-2011, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,214,581 times
Reputation: 998

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Hi there. As my username obviously indicates, I am from St. Louis. But I am considering relocating to Omaha. What I am specifically looking for on here is a topographic description of the area. I am used to river hills since I'm from St. Louis, and was assuming Omaha had fairly similar topography to most of STL (excluding the Ozark foothills). From photos I've seen, it appears Omaha is moderately hilly in the downtown and West Omaha areas all the way out to Elkhorn. And from other threads I've read, it appears that St. Louis, Cincinnati, Kansas City, Omaha, Des Moines (and much of the rest of Iowa) all seem to fall under the exceptions of Midwest cities that defy the Midwest's stereotypical flatness. I am also used to steamy summers, which I understand Omaha has. While St. Louis doesn't have Omaha's severe winters, it nonetheless gets very cold and often gets comparable snowfall (it just doesn't stay on the ground for long due to fact it thaws here much more often).
Anyway, I'm getting off track. What i'm really curious about in Omaha is the boundary between the hills and at what point west of Omaha they give way to that stereotypical Nebraska flatness. Several years ago I crossed the Missouri River at Hamburg Iowa on my way to Lincoln, 50 miles south of Omaha, and noticed the hills extend roughly 30 miles west of the Missouri there. I was assuming a similar principle would apply to Omaha? Anyway, thanks.

 
Old 09-08-2011, 09:33 AM
 
465 posts, read 371,390 times
Reputation: 129
Des moines and omaha are much smaller and much simpler and much flatter places than the rest. iowans and nebraskans go to the ozarks to see hills. I saw many trees ripped from the ground by thunderstorm winds in omaha not to mention that you better like your job in either because that is all you will have. The climate and cultural traditions of omaha and des moines are more like minneapolis than st. louis or kansas city. St. louis to omaha will be a shock to you. Cincinnati is much more interesting topographically and milder than all the other cities you mention and isn't really 'midwest' culturally or climate wise. st. louis is much milder and more diverse than any midwest city except chicago.
 
Old 09-08-2011, 10:26 AM
 
65 posts, read 109,692 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew Hall View Post
Des moines and omaha are much smaller and much simpler and much flatter places than the rest. iowans and nebraskans go to the ozarks to see hills. I saw many trees ripped from the ground by thunderstorm winds in omaha not to mention that you better like your job in either because that is all you will have. The climate and cultural traditions of omaha and des moines are more like minneapolis than st. louis or kansas city. St. louis to omaha will be a shock to you. Cincinnati is much more interesting topographically and milder than all the other cities you mention and isn't really 'midwest' culturally or climate wise. st. louis is much milder and more diverse than any midwest city except chicago.
OP, you might as well just ignore the above post. Omaha is very hilly. The hills generally extend west to around 72nd Street - the city then flattens out and becomes much more suburban. Council Bluffs is also very hilly. I moved here from Chicago after having lived in Madison and San Francisco. Omaha will not be a "shock" to someone coming from St. Louis. I can only imagine that Mr. Hall is not a very resilient individual, and might be a young boy who needs a lot of handle holding in territory that is unfamiliar to him. I am happy to read that he has found his utopia in Ohio. Perhaps he can now stop posting misinformation for unsuspecting persons to read on internet forums.
 
Old 09-08-2011, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,214,581 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by nebr View Post
OP, you might as well just ignore the above post. Omaha is very hilly. The hills generally extend west to around 72nd Street - the city then flattens out and becomes much more suburban. Council Bluffs is also very hilly. I moved here from Chicago after having lived in Madison and San Francisco. Omaha will not be a "shock" to someone coming from St. Louis. I can only imagine that Mr. Hall is not a very resilient individual, and might be a young boy who needs a lot of handle holding in territory that is unfamiliar to him. I am happy to read that he has found his utopia in Ohio. Perhaps he can now stop posting misinformation for unsuspecting persons to read on internet forums.
So basically are you telling that west of 72nd street, the city is flat as a board, or just gets dramatically less hilly? I'm just wondering because in pictures it doesn't look flat even as far west as Elkhorn. Almost none of it appeared flat to me, but gently rolling at the very minimum. But again, this is from the perspective of google earth and google images. Thanks. Also, Cincinnati IMO is the Midwest...the twelve states represented by the Census Bureau accurately depict it IMO.
 
Old 09-08-2011, 11:27 AM
 
624 posts, read 1,101,416 times
Reputation: 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
So basically are you telling that west of 72nd street, the city is flat as a board, or just gets dramatically less hilly? I'm just wondering because in pictures it doesn't look flat even as far west as Elkhorn. Almost none of it appeared flat to me, but gently rolling at the very minimum. But again, this is from the perspective of google earth and google images. Thanks. Also, Cincinnati IMO is the Midwest...the twelve states represented by the Census Bureau accurately depict it IMO.

Omaha is hilly all the way from the Missouri River to the Elkhorn River on the west side of town. Look at a map of the area in Google Maps and change the view to terrain and you will see plainly where the boundaries are. The are bluffs on the West side of town from the Elkhorn or Platte River that pretty sharply drop off into flood plain then becomes hilly again to the west of the Platte River. I'd say Eastern Nebraska is very hilly and the only reason for flat land in this area is because of flood plains
 
Old 09-08-2011, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,214,581 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Busguy2010 View Post
Omaha is hilly all the way from the Missouri River to the Elkhorn River on the west side of town. Look at a map of the area in Google Maps and change the view to terrain and you will see plainly where the boundaries are. The are bluffs on the West side of town from the Elkhorn or Platte River that pretty sharply drop off into flood plain then becomes hilly again to the west of the Platte River. I'd say Eastern Nebraska is very hilly and the only reason for flat land in this area is because of flood plains
Much appreciated. The same is definitely true for St. Louis as well. The only flat parts around here are largely flood-plain related.
 
Old 09-08-2011, 11:43 AM
CCJ
 
Location: Omaha
55 posts, read 140,458 times
Reputation: 24
After reading Matt's post I had to wonder if he has ever been out to Elkhorn? We live out here and I certainly wouldn't consider it flat. lol
 
Old 09-08-2011, 12:29 PM
 
65 posts, read 109,692 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
So basically are you telling that west of 72nd street, the city is flat as a board, or just gets dramatically less hilly? I'm just wondering because in pictures it doesn't look flat even as far west as Elkhorn. Almost none of it appeared flat to me, but gently rolling at the very minimum. But again, this is from the perspective of google earth and google images. Thanks. Also, Cincinnati IMO is the Midwest...the twelve states represented by the Census Bureau accurately depict it IMO.
Nothing in Omaha is flat as a board, as far as I can recall. Eastern Omaha has steep hills and western Omaha has rolling hills. I always forget that Elkhorn is now part of Omaha - it too is a hilly area with farms and woodland in the area.
 
Old 09-08-2011, 02:57 PM
 
465 posts, read 371,390 times
Reputation: 129
Everything is relative. Mt. everest is higher than pike's peak which is higher than the ozarks. Omaha isn't a two dimensional featureless plain, but very tellingly from the comments here it is very defensive and insecure. Southeast Nebraska does have some low rolling hills, even if they are mostly covered in corn and soybeans. Accept who and what you are, I say. A realistic self-image is a valuable thing. Pretense of any kind, even "midwestern nice" doesn't really do you or anyone else any good. Honesty truly is the best policy.
 
Old 09-08-2011, 03:32 PM
 
65 posts, read 109,692 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew Hall View Post
Everything is relative. Mt. everest is higher than pike's peak which is higher than the ozarks. Omaha isn't a two dimensional featureless plain, but very tellingly from the comments here it is very defensive and insecure. Southeast Nebraska does have some low rolling hills, even if they are mostly covered in corn and soybeans. Accept who and what you are, I say. A realistic self-image is a valuable thing. Pretense of any kind, even "midwestern nice" doesn't really do you or anyone else any good. Honesty truly is the best policy.
Stating facts does not reveal or even suggest defensiveness or insecurity. You purposefully misled the OP into believing that Omaha is flat. That sort of purposefulness suggests an agenda – one that is neither constructive nor honest - but is most certainly rooted in some sort of insecurity.
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