U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Nebraska > Omaha
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-07-2011, 12:39 PM
 
41 posts, read 109,693 times
Reputation: 34

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvinist View Post
I don't care to spend more money cleaning her teeth than I spend on my own teeth in a given year.
1. You probably have insurance to pay at least part of your bill.

2. You don't have to be put under general anesthesia to have your teeth cleaned.

3. Very few pets need a dental every year.

I just don't think it's okay to let a dog suffer because it's "just a dog" (just want to be clear, I'm not saying YOUR particular dog is suffering as I haven't even seen it). A little tartar doesn't hurt, but when allowed to go unchecked, they end up with periodontal disease, abscesses, etc. Dogs are great at hiding pain, but these are definitely painful conditions. Many owners are reluctant to have a dental done because they don't notice anything wrong other than maybe some bad breath. However, after getting the cleaning, extractions, etc. done, many say their dog is like a puppy again. One really bad case I had (had to remove all but 4 teeth), the dog actually went from being diabetic to normal (his body's response to the massive infection in his mouth was causing his blood glucose to be raised). He stopped having accidents in the house and was no longer as crabby with the kids. Studies are even showing links between dental disease and things like heart and kidney disease. Much easier and cheaper to just get their teeth cleaned before they start having real issues and needing extractions.

I don't expect people to have the same standard of care for their pet as they do for themselves or their children (though some do!), but don't like getting an earful about how "expensive" it is to do basic preventative care that helps a pet live a longer, happier life (speaking about clients, not people on this message board). If people don't want to do things like dentals, I just try to let them know the risks. I acknowledge that some vets are more "high pressure," whether they intend to be or not (yes, some are "selling," but some are just really passionate about doing what they think is right for the pet).

EDIT: And a big sorry for hijacking the thread!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-08-2011, 08:42 PM
 
6,122 posts, read 6,418,604 times
Reputation: 6520
Quote:
Originally Posted by schues View Post
1. You probably have insurance to pay at least part of your bill.

2. You don't have to be put under general anesthesia to have your teeth cleaned.

3. Very few pets need a dental every year.

I just don't think it's okay to let a dog suffer because it's "just a dog" (just want to be clear, I'm not saying YOUR particular dog is suffering as I haven't even seen it). A little tartar doesn't hurt, but when allowed to go unchecked, they end up with periodontal disease, abscesses, etc. Dogs are great at hiding pain, but these are definitely painful conditions. Many owners are reluctant to have a dental done because they don't notice anything wrong other than maybe some bad breath. However, after getting the cleaning, extractions, etc. done, many say their dog is like a puppy again. One really bad case I had (had to remove all but 4 teeth), the dog actually went from being diabetic to normal (his body's response to the massive infection in his mouth was causing his blood glucose to be raised). He stopped having accidents in the house and was no longer as crabby with the kids. Studies are even showing links between dental disease and things like heart and kidney disease. Much easier and cheaper to just get their teeth cleaned before they start having real issues and needing extractions.

I don't expect people to have the same standard of care for their pet as they do for themselves or their children (though some do!), but don't like getting an earful about how "expensive" it is to do basic preventative care that helps a pet live a longer, happier life (speaking about clients, not people on this message board). If people don't want to do things like dentals, I just try to let them know the risks. I acknowledge that some vets are more "high pressure," whether they intend to be or not (yes, some are "selling," but some are just really passionate about doing what they think is right for the pet).

EDIT: And a big sorry for hijacking the thread!
Very true. My dog had HORRIBLE teeth when I got her. She also had a heart murmur because of her bad teeth and now her heart is enlarged. It will shorten her lifespan. She has had to have 19 teeth removed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2011, 02:12 PM
 
6,486 posts, read 5,668,753 times
Reputation: 1272
Quote:
Originally Posted by schues View Post
1. You probably have insurance to pay at least part of your bill.

2. You don't have to be put under general anesthesia to have your teeth cleaned.

3. Very few pets need a dental every year.

I just don't think it's okay to let a dog suffer because it's "just a dog" (just want to be clear, I'm not saying YOUR particular dog is suffering as I haven't even seen it). A little tartar doesn't hurt, but when allowed to go unchecked, they end up with periodontal disease, abscesses, etc. Dogs are great at hiding pain, but these are definitely painful conditions. Many owners are reluctant to have a dental done because they don't notice anything wrong other than maybe some bad breath. However, after getting the cleaning, extractions, etc. done, many say their dog is like a puppy again. One really bad case I had (had to remove all but 4 teeth), the dog actually went from being diabetic to normal (his body's response to the massive infection in his mouth was causing his blood glucose to be raised). He stopped having accidents in the house and was no longer as crabby with the kids. Studies are even showing links between dental disease and things like heart and kidney disease. Much easier and cheaper to just get their teeth cleaned before they start having real issues and needing extractions.

I don't expect people to have the same standard of care for their pet as they do for themselves or their children (though some do!), but don't like getting an earful about how "expensive" it is to do basic preventative care that helps a pet live a longer, happier life (speaking about clients, not people on this message board). If people don't want to do things like dentals, I just try to let them know the risks. I acknowledge that some vets are more "high pressure," whether they intend to be or not (yes, some are "selling," but some are just really passionate about doing what they think is right for the pet).

EDIT: And a big sorry for hijacking the thread!
We'll have to agree to disagree. We all have limits of what we'll spend money on for pet health care. I don't believe in spending hundreds of dollars on a dog to get their teeth cleaned. You can choose to spend your cash on doggy dental work if you want.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2011, 09:37 AM
 
280 posts, read 708,492 times
Reputation: 180
I've heard that Pet Rocks are a great alternative to a living, breathing bundle of fur. Just not so cuddly.

This leaves plenty of cash to spend on big screen TV's, constant cell phone upgrades, beer and cigarettes and the millions and millions of available crap that the American consumer can't possible live without.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2011, 11:08 AM
 
6,486 posts, read 5,668,753 times
Reputation: 1272
Quote:
Originally Posted by altajoe View Post
I've heard that Pet Rocks are a great alternative to a living, breathing bundle of fur. Just not so cuddly.

This leaves plenty of cash to spend on big screen TV's, constant cell phone upgrades, beer and cigarettes and the millions and millions of available crap that the American consumer can't possible live without.
I've heard that some people prefer to spend their money on their kids instead of treating dogs like they're children. But that's just me....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2011, 01:06 PM
 
6,122 posts, read 6,418,604 times
Reputation: 6520
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvinist View Post
I've heard that some people prefer to spend their money on their kids instead of treating dogs like they're children. But that's just me....
Others treat both their children and animals like family members and gladly pay for the things both need. Novel concept, I guess.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2011, 01:16 PM
 
65 posts, read 109,692 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvinist View Post
I've heard that some people prefer to spend their money on their kids instead of treating dogs like they're children. But that's just me....
I'd rather spend money on the dog - the kid can get a job.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2011, 05:00 PM
 
Location: SE Nebraska
12 posts, read 30,328 times
Reputation: 13
We've used Ralston Vet for two years; it's the only place we've ever taken my daughter's dog. She's been for check-ups, got spayed, micro-chipped, had one "urgent" visit, and we've made at least half a dozen calls for minor concerns. We've never had any problems, the prices haven't changed, and we can always make an appointment with the same doctor. It's a little further, but I wanted to chime in with the others who are recommending it. We don't have cats, but there are always a couple of cat owners there when we go in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Nebraska > Omaha
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:24 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top