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Old 07-19-2011, 04:29 PM
 
465 posts, read 373,332 times
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I've got to admit that I was shocked to see that food, energy and rental housing are about 15% more expensive in omaha compared to cincinnati where I came from even though cincy is several times larger and has significantly higher state taxes. I had assumed omaha would be unbeatable on expenses, but it isn't for what its worth. Maybe it the isolation that adds to the expense of shipping goods in, or maybe its just the cost of having to have so much energy capacity for the winter that doesn't get used in the summer that adds to energy costs.
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Old 07-19-2011, 04:36 PM
 
465 posts, read 373,332 times
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I think you have to grow up in the upper midwest to truly feel at home in omaha. People who move from other regions as adults are the ones who will have the greatest difficulty adjusting to a regional culture that is extremely risk-averse, and committed to orderliness, predictability and social sameness almost more than live itself.
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Old 07-19-2011, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Omaha, NE
163 posts, read 322,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew Hall View Post
I think you have to grow up in the upper midwest to truly feel at home in omaha. People who move from other regions as adults are the ones who will have the greatest difficulty adjusting to a regional culture that is extremely risk-averse, and committed to orderliness, predictability and social sameness almost more than live itself.
This is a good post. The adjustment to living in Omaha has very little to do with getting accustomed to cold, snowy winters, where all the restaurants and malls are, or what areas of town are bad and should be avoided. The transition to normal life in Omaha is much more cultural than a lot of people would think. For people from Omaha, or from the greater region, a lot of it would seem like a given fact of life, but it can really be a hiccup for people who grew up and established themselves elsewhere.
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Old 07-19-2011, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Midtown Omaha
1,225 posts, read 1,817,910 times
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But again that is similar across the country. Not many people could simply uproot from where they grew up and the way their local culture and just fit in from day one somewhere new.

I couldn't do it in the south(I hate the south). I would have a tough time adjusting to a coast because it is very different from Omaha. I hardly think Omaha is unique in being a culture shock for people from a different area of the country.
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Old 07-19-2011, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Omaha, NE
163 posts, read 322,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamjacobm View Post
But again that is similar across the country. Not many people could simply uproot from where they grew up and the way their local culture and just fit in from day one somewhere new.

I couldn't do it in the south(I hate the south). I would have a tough time adjusting to a coast because it is very different from Omaha. I hardly think Omaha is unique in being a culture shock for people from a different area of the country.
True to an extent. Obviously just my opinion, but I think the Midwest (as well as the South) are harder to adjust to for outsiders than say the New England area, the Mid-Atlantic, the Southwest, or the Rocky Mountain West. I think the Midwest culture is very static. It's not like you'll be persecuted for being an outsider, but the cultural atmosphere is less conductive for people to sift through from other areas of the country.
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Old 07-19-2011, 06:14 PM
 
1,072 posts, read 2,316,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew Hall View Post
I think you have to grow up in the upper midwest to truly feel at home in omaha. People who move from other regions as adults are the ones who will have the greatest difficulty adjusting to a regional culture that is extremely risk-averse, and committed to orderliness, predictability and social sameness almost more than live itself.
I moved to Omaha from Albuquerque when I was 18 and there was no problem adjusting. I absolutely loved it. I loved how normal it is compared to Albuquerque (the people, the landscape, the houses, the architecture, etc). I did eventually leave and return to Albuquerque, mainly to be closer to my family. I tried living in Austin later, and THAT was a place where I had difficulty adjusting and feeling like I fit in. Having visited many other regions of the country, almost every place I think to myself "I can't see myself fitting in here or living here." Omaha, however, still calls to me, especially now that I have children. I have always, and will always love the culture in Omaha. We are *trying* to relocate there (wish us luck on the job front!). Hopefully we will be there in less than a year.
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Old 07-19-2011, 06:29 PM
 
816 posts, read 1,420,902 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ManOnTheMoon View Post
True to an extent. Obviously just my opinion, but I think the Midwest (as well as the South) are harder to adjust to for outsiders than say the New England area, the Mid-Atlantic, the Southwest, or the Rocky Mountain West. I think the Midwest culture is very static. It's not like you'll be persecuted for being an outsider, but the cultural atmosphere is less conductive for people to sift through from other areas of the country.
This I have to completely disagree with. I work with people from all over the united states that now live in Omaha and none had any problems adjusting to Omaha. In fact none have really had anything negative to say about the city (other than the cold in the winter).
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Old 07-19-2011, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Omaha, NE
163 posts, read 322,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harshbarj View Post
This I have to completely disagree with. I work with people from all over the united states that now live in Omaha and none had any problems adjusting to Omaha. In fact none have really had anything negative to say about the city (other than the cold in the winter).
I suppose we've just had different experiences. I know plenty of transplants who have done well here, I wouldn't suggest otherwise. It's not hard to adjust, just not as easy as elsewhere, in my experience.
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Old 07-19-2011, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,178 posts, read 9,425,030 times
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To be truthful, I think a lot depends on the transplant. If someone goes to any area, expecting that place to answer all their wants and needs, to solve all of their problems, be they financial, emotional, or physical, and/or to meet all of their expectations, they will inevitably be disappointed.

People who are centered and know who they are, who are open to, respect, and enjoy the magnificent diversities, who know where they are going/what their goals are, will seek out places that suit those personal goals. They won't worry about "Why don't people like me?" or "This place isn't perfect!" or "Why isn't this more like home?" They'll eventually make friends with other like-minded people, and won't care that they can't be friends with everybody, right away. They'll enjoy what the new places have to offer, and take the time to experience them fully. They'll participate in what pleases them, and ignore what does not. They aren't afraid to learn or ask questions; and, if they are rebuffed, will seek out other people, other places, other learning experiences. But they always know where they're going and who they are!
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Old 07-19-2011, 08:22 PM
 
4 posts, read 7,891 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
To be truthful, I think a lot depends on the transplant. If someone goes to any area, expecting that place to answer all their wants and needs, to solve all of their problems, be they financial, emotional, or physical, and/or to meet all of their expectations, they will inevitably be disappointed.

People who are centered and know who they are, who are open to, respect, and enjoy the magnificent diversities, who know where they are going/what their goals are, will seek out places that suit those personal goals. They won't worry about "Why don't people like me?" or "This place isn't perfect!" or "Why isn't this more like home?" They'll eventually make friends with other like-minded people, and won't care that they can't be friends with everybody, right away. They'll enjoy what the new places have to offer, and take the time to experience them fully. They'll participate in what pleases them, and ignore what does not. They aren't afraid to learn or ask questions; and, if they are rebuffed, will seek out other people, other places, other learning experiences. But they always know where they're going and who they are!
Exactly! I've lived in 2 continents, 3 countries, and 4 cities. Omaha will be my next stop. I am actually quite excited about it. When I moved from the West Coast to the South, my friends were genuinely concerned. When I told my friends in the South that I'd be moving to Nebraska, they, too, became genuinely concerned.

Moving isn't easy but I truly believe that you can make any place home. It'll take time, but it'll work out in the end, as long as you try.
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