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Old 12-02-2008, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Omaha
474 posts, read 741,053 times
Reputation: 176
Default bulk wheat

Where is the best place in Omaha to find bulk wheat? The better half and I need to find wheat to mill into flour. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks.
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Old 12-02-2008, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
2,657 posts, read 3,648,648 times
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I live just down the road in Lincoln. I have several thousand bushels of hard red winter wheat but it is in NW Kansas so that won't work. Here is a better idea.

Go to a local elevator where truckers are waiting in line to load or unload. Ask on the CB radio if anyone has a bushel of wheat they want to sell. I am sure if you offer a $20 bill for a bushel you will find a taker.

A bushel of wheat in truckload amounts brings around $5.25/bushel currently. A bushel of wheat is 60 pounds. Take some clean plastic buckets with lids. Grease buckets that fast food restaurants like McDonalds use will work great. Two of them filled with wheat should get enough wheat to keep you in flour for quite a while. Just have the driver lift the tarp and either fill them for you or have him let you fill them. Don't take too much time and try to do the negotiating with the driver on the CB and don't interfere with elevator operations.

Buying off the truck means you will have to clean it. The best way to do this is by sifting through several different size screens. Take two empty coffee cans that have the metal bottoms cut out. Save the plastic lids. Place a screen with the largest sized holes on the top of and empty can and pour wheat from the other can through it. Repeat with smaller screens. I always put a fan off to the side of the cans so a stiff breeze can blow the light weight particles in the wheat to the side of the can. If it is a nice day do this operation outside. This process will get your wheat just as clean as most mills can do it.

You might be able to find a local grocer that sells wheat for home milling but I have a feeling that you will pay $20 and not have more than ten or twenty pounds at the most.

Good Luck

GL2
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Old 12-03-2008, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Papillion
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Great idea above... I think you can also get it through the Nebraska Food Cooperative which does have a couple of drop sights in Omaha.
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Old 12-03-2008, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Omaha
2,716 posts, read 4,491,055 times
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Don't mean to change the subject, but, is milling your own flour (if thats what it's called) fresher or something? I'm just confused why everyone doesn't just buy flower from the store.
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Old 12-03-2008, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
2,657 posts, read 3,648,648 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burgerflipper View Post
Don't mean to change the subject, but, is milling your own flour (if thats what it's called) fresher or something? I'm just confused why everyone doesn't just buy flower from the store.
************************************************** *****
Wheat kept in a dry, cool air tight container will stay fresh a long time. If vacuum packed shelf life is measured in decades. Flour has a shelf life significantly less.

I believe in storing non perishable items for future hard times. Wheat, yeast,baking powder, baking sodawater, dehydrated veggies, Jerky, salt, pepper, spices,sugar, pastas, MEDICATIONS, dried milk etc., can be stored and if used in rotation it is possible to keep a year or two supply of staples on hand for emergencies.

Have you ever faced a personal financial crisis when buying daily living items was very difficult? I have and because of my hoard I never missed a meal. People that do this are not paranoid. They are showing good judgment. Hopefully this country will never face a situation like our parents and grandparents faced during the Great Depression but having a supply of basics on hand would help get through a situation like that.

GL2
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Old 12-03-2008, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Omaha
2,716 posts, read 4,491,055 times
Reputation: 1171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunluvver2 View Post
************************************************** *****
Wheat kept in a dry, cool air tight container will stay fresh a long time. If vacuum packed shelf life is measured in decades. Flour has a shelf life significantly less.

I believe in storing non perishable items for future hard times. Wheat, yeast,baking powder, baking sodawater, dehydrated veggies, Jerky, salt, pepper, spices,sugar, pastas, MEDICATIONS, dried milk etc., can be stored and if used in rotation it is possible to keep a year or two supply of staples on hand for emergencies.

Have you ever faced a personal financial crisis when buying daily living items was very difficult? I have and because of my hoard I never missed a meal. People that do this are not paranoid. They are showing good judgment. Hopefully this country will never face a situation like our parents and grandparents faced during the Great Depression but having a supply of basics on hand would help get through a situation like that.

GL2
That makes sense. I wasn't judging I just\ had no idea. My parents acutally do the same but not quite on the level you are.
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Old 12-03-2008, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Omaha
474 posts, read 741,053 times
Reputation: 176
Thanks for the suggestions guys.
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Old 12-03-2008, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Papillion
2,583 posts, read 6,853,778 times
Reputation: 833
A Whole Foods or Wild Oats store would have it I think - they have lots of bulk grains.
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