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Old 07-01-2009, 04:15 PM
 
9 posts, read 36,597 times
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Omaha’s population catching up to KC’s, census data show - Kansas City Star (http://www.kansascity.com/105/story/1299845.html - broken link)

I thought this was kinda interesting.
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Old 07-01-2009, 05:35 PM
 
Location: West Omaha
1,181 posts, read 3,646,232 times
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Its interesting but, as the article points out its the metro population that matters. Kansas City feels like a much bigger city because of the surrounding metro, which isn't included in the KC proper number.

Based on the city "proper" numbers I believe Omaha is bigger than Cleveland, Atlanta, and St. Louis, for example. Obviously, we don't belong in those categories. It is nice to see progress but the numbers are pretty skewed.
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Old 07-01-2009, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Omaha: the land cab rides!
49 posts, read 143,780 times
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lol, Matt, i agree...when some visits Omaha and i drive them for a week or so:

response #1: It's nice to visit a small town.
response #2: Is this west Omaha?(just hit 72nd street)
response #3: Wow! this town is bigger then I thought...
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Old 07-01-2009, 09:39 PM
 
Location: West Omaha
1,181 posts, read 3,646,232 times
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I do believe most vastly underestimate the size of the Omaha metro. And I think Omaha has gained a lot of momentum in the last 10 years or so. I just think its more worthwhile to consider the relevant numbers.
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Old 07-01-2009, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,340 posts, read 8,688,269 times
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True, the bureau is not known for accurate estimates.
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Old 07-02-2009, 12:32 AM
 
Location: Tampa (by way of Omaha)
13,890 posts, read 19,073,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattpoulsen View Post
Its interesting but, as the article points out its the metro population that matters. Kansas City feels like a much bigger city because of the surrounding metro, which isn't included in the KC proper number.

Based on the city "proper" numbers I believe Omaha is bigger than Cleveland, Atlanta, and St. Louis, for example. Obviously, we don't belong in those categories. It is nice to see progress but the numbers are pretty skewed.
IMO we're a far superior city to Kansas City, Cleveland and St.Louis. Kansas City is all sprawled out and not that impressive, while St. Louis has lost alot to the outer suburbs. Cleveland is kind of a dirty city too. I would never want to live there.

With that said, I'm not a big fan of using the metro numbers either. IMO that number is really only important for ranking sports/TV markets.
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Old 07-02-2009, 06:10 AM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,293 posts, read 23,100,440 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattpoulsen View Post
Its interesting but, as the article points out its the metro population that matters. Kansas City feels like a much bigger city because of the surrounding metro, which isn't included in the KC proper number.

Based on the city "proper" numbers I believe Omaha is bigger than Cleveland, Atlanta, and St. Louis, for example. Obviously, we don't belong in those categories. It is nice to see progress but the numbers are pretty skewed.
Right. That's a good point.

It's the same with Minneapolis, where both my sons live. Technically, Minneapolis proper might have a smaller population than Omaha. But the Minneapolis metro area is about triple the size of the Omaha metro area.


It should also be noted that we're seeing a slight migration of people back into downtown Omaha. I think this is great news, and hope the trend continues - which I think it will, with the construction of the Wall Street Towers and continuing expansion of new condos & town houses in the Gallup & Little Italy areas.

Omaha.com - The Omaha World-Herald: Metro/Region
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Old 07-02-2009, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
2,693 posts, read 4,650,005 times
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As others have posted, metro numbers are ALL that matters. With any city, the city proper numbers don't mean much at all, because for all intents and purposes the metro IS the city. If you're in Hollywood or Van Nuys you are essentially in Los Angeles. If you are in Bloomington you are essentially in Minneapolis. If you are in Westminster or Aurora you are in Denver.

That being said, sure Omaha is still a lot smaller than KC, and because of that doesn't have all of the same amenities that KC has, but it is still an impressive metro in its own regard- and I think a lot nicer than KC, which has lots and lots of terrible blight.
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Old 07-02-2009, 08:47 AM
 
47,543 posts, read 45,245,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by achillestendon69 View Post
Omaha’s population catching up to KC’s, census data show - Kansas City Star (http://www.kansascity.com/105/story/1299845.html - broken link)

I thought this was kinda interesting.
I knew KCMO was the largest city in Missouri. Many people think St. Louis is the largest city because it is the most well-known. STL has been bleeding out people for decades. KCMO has been gaining population, slowly, but surely. Omaha, I knew it was growing, but that fast, wow.
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Old 07-02-2009, 09:14 AM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,293 posts, read 23,100,440 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jm31828 View Post
As others have posted, metro numbers are ALL that matters. With any city, the city proper numbers don't mean much at all, because for all intents and purposes the metro IS the city. If you're in Hollywood or Van Nuys you are essentially in Los Angeles. If you are in Bloomington you are essentially in Minneapolis. If you are in Westminster or Aurora you are in Denver.

That being said, sure Omaha is still a lot smaller than KC, and because of that doesn't have all of the same amenities that KC has, but it is still an impressive metro in its own regard- and I think a lot nicer than KC, which has lots and lots of terrible blight.
I agree.

I'd guess that the only realm in which "city borders" matter is taxation and infrastructure.
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