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Old 01-05-2010, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Lincoln, NE
172 posts, read 226,827 times
Reputation: 136

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Yeah, I was wondering how all of you were coping with this cold spell. Here in Georgia, my heat is running non-stop, and my house built in 2002 still doesn't reach the set temperature of 68 degrees. I guess many of the houses down here aren't insulated well enough to handle this type of unusual cold. Is this ever an issue in Omaha? Would there be a big difference between newer and older homes with heating and efficiency? I grew up in an older home that still had walls with plaster, but I swear they seemed to contain the heat better than drywall.
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Old 01-05-2010, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Kingdom Bound!
44 posts, read 47,044 times
Reputation: 18
I only use a space heater down in the basement if I am working on something down on the work bench and it is only on when I am down there so I am not worried about it burning down the house. If something goes wrong I am RIGHT there. Other than that we keep our house at 62-64 degrees to save money (for me that is really what "green-living" is all about... Keeping more "Green" in my pocket! ) The wife and I enjoy our sweaters and slippers though!
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Old 01-05-2010, 09:36 PM
 
3,284 posts, read 1,091,316 times
Reputation: 1832
Quote:
Originally Posted by geog-fanatic View Post
Yeah, I was wondering how all of you were coping with this cold spell. Here in Georgia, my heat is running non-stop, and my house built in 2002 still doesn't reach the set temperature of 68 degrees. I guess many of the houses down here aren't insulated well enough to handle this type of unusual cold. Is this ever an issue in Omaha? Would there be a big difference between newer and older homes with heating and efficiency? I grew up in an older home that still had walls with plaster, but I swear they seemed to contain the heat better than drywall.
Typically the older the home, the less efficient.
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Old 01-05-2010, 10:27 PM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,293 posts, read 14,292,671 times
Reputation: 3659
Quote:
Originally Posted by geog-fanatic View Post
Yeah, I was wondering how all of you were coping with this cold spell. Here in Georgia, my heat is running non-stop, and my house built in 2002 still doesn't reach the set temperature of 68 degrees. I guess many of the houses down here aren't insulated well enough to handle this type of unusual cold. Is this ever an issue in Omaha? Would there be a big difference between newer and older homes with heating and efficiency? I grew up in an older home that still had walls with plaster, but I swear they seemed to contain the heat better than drywall.
Well... An older home that has not been updated can be pretty horrible to heat.

In my opinion, however, older homes are usually built better than the new McMansions, so you've got something to work with when it comes time to make improvements.

The house my family is now in is a 2-story brick home, built in 1928. Absolutely rock solid, square and straight. High efficiency heat system, and I've super-insulated and sealed it. We're good to go.
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Old 01-05-2010, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Chicago
36,366 posts, read 57,116,171 times
Reputation: 25261
In my experience the biggest problem with older homes and buildings is the windows. If they have the original windows, you're in for one hell of a heating bill come wintertime. Even that plastic crap can only do so much.
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Old 01-05-2010, 10:52 PM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,293 posts, read 14,292,671 times
Reputation: 3659
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
In my experience the biggest problem with older homes and buildings is the windows. If they have the original windows, you're in for one hell of a heating bill come wintertime. Even that plastic crap can only do so much.
Yep.

On the plus side, Seal N Peel does wonders - even if your windows aren't too bad!

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Old 01-06-2010, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Omaha
50 posts, read 6,834 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omaha Rocks View Post
Yep.

On the plus side, Seal N Peel does wonders - even if your windows aren't too bad!

It's funny you should mention this. My landlord about threw a fit when I caulked my windows for the winter. He thought I was "damaging his property."

Sometimes you just have to take matters into your own hands I guess...

My biggest heat problem is that I leave one window unsealed so I can sit and smoke by it. That happens maybe 3 or 4 times a day. I don't think it makes much difference anyway.
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Old 01-06-2010, 07:45 PM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,293 posts, read 14,292,671 times
Reputation: 3659
Quote:
Originally Posted by MATTDAMON View Post
It's funny you should mention this. My landlord about threw a fit when I caulked my windows for the winter. He thought I was "damaging his property."

Sometimes you just have to take matters into your own hands I guess...

My biggest heat problem is that I leave one window unsealed so I can sit and smoke by it. That happens maybe 3 or 4 times a day. I don't think it makes much difference anyway.
Did you use Seal N Peel, or just regular caulk or silicone? If you didn't use Seal N Peel, your landlord has every right to be royally POd. On the other hand, he many have no idea what Seal N Peel is.
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Old 01-06-2010, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Omaha
50 posts, read 6,834 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omaha Rocks View Post
Did you use Seal N Peel, or just regular caulk or silicone? If you didn't use Seal N Peel, your landlord has every right to be royally POd. On the other hand, he many have no idea what Seal N Peel is.
I used seal and peel. The same stuff I use every year. Even after I pulled it off one of the windows he was still convinced it was destroying the whole property.
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Old 01-06-2010, 11:59 PM
 
71 posts, read 19,359 times
Reputation: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omaha Rocks View Post
Cool. You must have purchased a better space heater. I know that some of them can be extremely hard on the electric bill.

Even so, you're doing it the right way - dropping the heat everywhere but exactly where you are at. How cold does the rest of your place get when you turn the furnace off?

And by the way, wow, 1300 sqf is a huge apartment. Kudos!
There is no such thing as a "Better space heater" in terms of how well it converts electrical energy into heat energy. 1,500 Watts of BTU heat will always equal 1,500 Watts of BTU heat. Sure different space heaters will distribute the heat differently and use different methods like radiant vs convection but the end result is the exact same thing.

When shopping for a space heater read the labels on the back. 90% of them will say 1,500 watts maximum. The other 10% only go up to around 600 watts or 900 watts.

The reason why some people are saving money using their electric space heaters is because they are doing so wisely. They are heating a small space. Their gas heaters are inefficient. Their house is huge compared to the area sectioned off to their bedroom. Also their utility company might charge them a whole let less for 1 kilowatt of electricity vs someone living in a different part of the country. Same with natural gas prices and home heating oil prices.

You should take more science and physics classes. Even I know this stuff and I didn't graduate from college.
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