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Old 03-15-2011, 05:05 PM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,585 posts, read 20,542,878 times
Reputation: 16143

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Conform or die.
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Old 03-15-2011, 09:27 PM
 
Location: LB/OC for now...
5,112 posts, read 12,131,436 times
Reputation: 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbybee View Post
Nice post, CJ!

I was going to replace my lawn with native drought-resistant plants but my neighbors all had a tizzy. One of them said, "If you want to look at desert plants, move to the desert!". My reply was, "We live in a desert, my friend!". She just huffed and walked away.

But, I caved and had new Marathon sod installed. It looks real pretty, though.

I am such a woos...........
Xeriscaping is what they call it. Most modernized HOAs allow xeriscaping as far as I know, even if people may sneer at it. Still beats the rocklawns you have in Phoenix
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Old 03-17-2011, 08:06 PM
 
394 posts, read 513,211 times
Reputation: 159
Yeah, bh, I did all the research, had plans drawn up, picked out all the plants I was gonna buy, etc. But then I decided to sell my house and I figured that it would be easier to market if the front yard "fit in" with the neighborhood.

No, HOA where I live (which is a good thing, imo)
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Old 03-18-2011, 06:00 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan and Sometimes Orange County CA
15,819 posts, read 32,471,367 times
Reputation: 11878
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fontucky View Post
I guess conformity and uniformity is what's important to people nowadays.

Excuse me while I crank off a big, fat yawn.



My dog wants to chime in as well.

I take it then that you do not live in South OC?
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Old 03-18-2011, 10:17 AM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,585 posts, read 20,542,878 times
Reputation: 16143
I did from 1960 to 2004... but what does that have to do with wildflowers and other native plants in one's yard?
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Old 03-18-2011, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan and Sometimes Orange County CA
15,819 posts, read 32,471,367 times
Reputation: 11878
Nothing directly. However your post stated that conformity and uniformity makes you yawn. South OC is all about conformity and uniformity. Thus, if you are not a fan of conformity and uniformity, you probably do not live there.
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Old 03-18-2011, 12:41 PM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,585 posts, read 20,542,878 times
Reputation: 16143
Ahhh, but there are large swaths that predate the HOA, CC&R, earthtones only conformity. That's where I'm from. It's not all Ladera Ranch or Mission Viejo, not to take anything away from those areas. They're beautiful in their own rights.
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Old 03-18-2011, 04:06 PM
 
166 posts, read 197,739 times
Reputation: 63
Hmmmm ... not certain where I would fit in on this topic.

For starters I recognize that some who say they will plant with "native plants and wildflowers" in reality simply allow the lawn to go to seed and do not cut it and call the dandelions "wildflowers." Not attractive. Whereas, well planned and maintained native yards can be beautiful and enviromentally friendly in that they require little or much less fertilizer, water, and such. Therefore, I recognize that wide interpretations can occur.

Xeriscape done well can be very interesting. But I dislike the white rock surrounded by gray rock surrounded by red rock designs that are fairly common in the Phoenix metro area. Those rock landscapes can actually entail the use of large amounts of weed killer which can then run into water sources during the monsoons.

I suppose it comes down to pride in your home. Variety makes for a more interesting, more inviting neighborhood but only if home owners have pride in their property.

Fontucky, I love fruit trees and am intrigued. What type of layout/design did you use? Fruit tree maintenance can be time consuming and get costly as well.
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Old 03-18-2011, 04:48 PM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,585 posts, read 20,542,878 times
Reputation: 16143
Quote:
Originally Posted by IMidwestMom View Post
allow the lawn to go to seed and do not cut it and call the dandelions "wildflowers." Not attractive.
There are plenty of those around as well: REO homes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IMidwestMom View Post
Fontucky, I love fruit trees and am intrigued. What type of layout/design did you use? Fruit tree maintenance can be time consuming and get costly as well.
I planted them just like my family members did back in the 19th century when they laid out their orchards in LA and OC: In a straight line with room for growth in the best possible soil. The soil part came with the property, lucky for me. This area has some amazingly fecund earth beneath it. I feed them twice a year and irrigate them slowly to discourage surface rooting, which could prove disastrous to the trees here in the land of the mighty Santa Ana wind.

Some of the fruit (peach, plum, Concord, grapefruit, avocado) have been here for years. This is an old farmhouse.
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Old 03-18-2011, 09:49 PM
 
166 posts, read 197,739 times
Reputation: 63
Your place sounds beautiful Fontucky and your landscape plan seems to fit with your homes style so I wouldn't expect neighbors to have negative concerns. I wasn't sure if you planted in a 'decorative' style or a 'functional' style. I like the functional style for the right style of house ("old farmhouse") as it would give the home solidity and a sense of permanence.

I would love a variety of fruit trees. Here in MN we have fantastic soil but harsh winters and short growing seasons. I had three apricot trees in a protected area and they lasted about 7 years. I have an almond tree that keeps hanging in there (beautiful blooms) as well as a variety of apple trees. I have trouble getting the pruning correct for the apple trees as they were neglected for a number of years.

I will need to get an avocado tree when I get to CA. My love of avocados has become something of a joke with family and friends. :-/

Last edited by IMidwestMom; 03-18-2011 at 09:57 PM..
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