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Old 07-05-2011, 11:15 AM
 
3,151 posts, read 3,089,309 times
Reputation: 3598

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsduhon View Post
Hi there! I am driving to Houston from Anaheim, CA and this is my first time embarking on such a long road trip. I was planning on leaving late at night or early morning to get thru as much as I can before the sun comes up. I will have a car packed with stuff (Clothes, boxes, etc.). I plan on taking the I 10 straight thru. So I want to ask if there are any little tips that you well traveled ppl may know of such as places to eat along the way, road conditions, what to watch out for, etc. I'll be traveling alone and already know to be alert and vigilant but also wanna know as much as I need to know before I head out. I appreciate any help. Thanks1
Love road trips!
I'm usually with my hubby, but if I were travelling alone, I would avoid driving too late at night. I'd hate for my car to break down after dark late at night. Who knows what one could encounter!

Anyway, good practical suggestions so far...

On just a fun note, one of our favorite things to do on long drives is to listen to film music!
Especially some good dramatic scores with some high energy cues.
Really enhances our enjoyment of the adventure, and something with a lot of percussion and a "driving pace" keeps us alert!

I might also suggest checking out "trip" web sites for places to eat etc. Look at your map, see where you might want to stop and look up reviews for coffee shops, dining etc. We've come across the best hole in the wall local eats that way!

Have fun, stay safe!!
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Old 07-05-2011, 10:35 PM
 
248 posts, read 506,554 times
Reputation: 202
A long boring drive. Although once you are out of El Paso, you can drive 80 mph legally. Once you get to Kerrville alot of the Hill Country towns are nice. Austin is also fun to explore.
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Old 07-07-2011, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
26,536 posts, read 62,986,490 times
Reputation: 30570
We drove to Dallas area several times. We also go on regular road trips. Some suggestions:

PLan to stop in New Mexico just before the Texas border. Even when we planned to drive straight through, we alsways seemed to end up at the same place, too tired to continue. There is a motel in whatever town that is just off the freeway, it is cheap and reasonable clean.

Do not pull over and sleep in Arizona if you can avoid it. We got caught in some incredibly violent stroms and there was no one around to help if we have a problem.

Make and emergency kit. Put it all in a big plastic tub in your trunk. It is expensive, but could save your life. You will be going through areas with no cell service and no one around for miles and miles. At a minumum include loads of water, vitamins, pain killers, rope, a knife, flashlight (the hand crank powered kind is best), two wire hangers, duct tape, a socket set, pliers, hammer, a Can of PB Blaster, a can of Fix a flat, a whistle, matches or a lighter (not battery powered lighter), flares and/or bottle rockets, bug spray, boots or good walking shoes, a hat, sunblock, and a good quality first aid kit. There are another fifty or so items that it woudl be good to include. I posted a fairly comprehensive list of what I put in ours somewhere in Citydata. Possibly in Automotive, but I am not sure.

Vitimin b (or 5 hour energy) is a much better way to help stay alert than caffeine.

Do not forget sunglasses, or buy some.

Leave early in the morning, not late at night. If you leave at 6 a.m. you will easily make the New Mexico/Texas border your first day (which is where I suggest that you stop).

Take frequent breaks. Even a 5 minute walk/run can recharge you for a couple of hours.

Bring maps. You navigator will not always work. You had better know where you are going without it.

Try to plan your stops. There are some places along the way that are dangerous for a single person to stop in.

Bring car fluids - oil, coolant, steering, brake, windshield washer and transmission fluids. You may want to bring a bottle of Bars leak, but it can be bad for your car and end up costing you a lot of money. However driving an overheated car is worse. If your car overheats, stop. You can ruin your engine if you keep driving.

Make sure your car has enough gas to make it to the next population center or service station. You only have a few areas with long stretches between services, but you do nto want to run short.

Sugary snacks and carbohydrates make you sleepy in the long term. Stick with nuts, jerky, protein bars, and the like. Avoid sweets, chips, pastries - they will put you right to sleep after the sugar rush wears off.

Pre-record your favorite driving music. If you need some ideas, go to the automotive boards and find the thread on driving music. (Radar Love is a must for road trips).

Have your car completely checked out before you leave, change the fluids, replace the tires if necessary, have them check the belts, brakes, all fluids, etc.

Have fun. Rememebr if you drive at night, you will not see anything but the road and you will miss the opportunity to see what a glorious country we have. Night driving also puts more strain on your eyes.
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Old 07-07-2011, 08:31 AM
 
Location: El Dorado Hills, CA
3,693 posts, read 8,343,710 times
Reputation: 3812
And when you drive up to that gas station, and gas is $5/gallon. Buy it! The "next station" sign that says there is a station 30 miles away might not know that the station is now closed. You don't want to run out of gas in the middle of nowhere.
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Old 07-07-2011, 11:36 AM
 
Location: San Angelo, Texas
795 posts, read 1,326,931 times
Reputation: 764
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
We drove to Dallas area several times. We also go on regular road trips. Some suggestions:

PLan to stop in New Mexico just before the Texas border. Even when we planned to drive straight through, we alsways seemed to end up at the same place, too tired to continue. There is a motel in whatever town that is just off the freeway, it is cheap and reasonable clean.
Sounds like youre talking about Anthony New Mexico. Theres a really nice and reasonable Best Western there right off the freeway. Thats where I stopped. They serve a great continental breakfast there too.
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Old 07-07-2011, 11:40 AM
 
3,151 posts, read 3,089,309 times
Reputation: 3598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
We drove to Dallas area several times. We also go on regular road trips. Some suggestions:

PLan to stop in New Mexico just before the Texas border. Even when we planned to drive straight through, we alsways seemed to end up at the same place, too tired to continue. There is a motel in whatever town that is just off the freeway, it is cheap and reasonable clean.

Do not pull over and sleep in Arizona if you can avoid it. We got caught in some incredibly violent stroms and there was no one around to help if we have a problem.

Make and emergency kit. Put it all in a big plastic tub in your trunk. It is expensive, but could save your life. You will be going through areas with no cell service and no one around for miles and miles. At a minumum include loads of water, vitamins, pain killers, rope, a knife, flashlight (the hand crank powered kind is best), , a socket set, , a Can of PB Blaster, a can of Fix a flat, a whistle, matches or a lighter (not battery powered lighter), flares and/or bottle rockets, bug spray, boots or good walking shoes, a hat, sunblock, and a good quality first aid kit. There are another fifty or so items that it woudl be good to include. I posted a fairly comprehensive list of what I put in ours somewhere in Citydata. Possibly in Automotive, but I am not sure.

Vitimin b (or 5 hour energy) is a much better way to help stay alert than caffeine.

Do not forget sunglasses, or buy some.

Leave early in the morning, not late at night. If you leave at 6 a.m. you will easily make the New Mexico/Texas border your first day (which is where I suggest that you stop).

Take frequent breaks. Even a 5 minute walk/run can recharge you for a couple of hours.

Bring maps. You navigator will not always work. You had better know where you are going without it.

Try to plan your stops. There are some places along the way that are dangerous for a single person to stop in.

Bring car fluids - oil, coolant, steering, brake, windshield washer and transmission fluids. You may want to bring a bottle of Bars leak, but it can be bad for your car and end up costing you a lot of money. However driving an overheated car is worse. If your car overheats, stop. You can ruin your engine if you keep driving.

Make sure your car has enough gas to make it to the next population center or service station. You only have a few areas with long stretches between services, but you do nto want to run short.

Sugary snacks and carbohydrates make you sleepy in the long term. Stick with nuts, jerky, protein bars, and the like. Avoid sweets, chips, pastries - they will put you right to sleep after the sugar rush wears off.

Pre-record your favorite driving music. If you need some ideas, go to the automotive boards and find the thread on driving music. (Radar Love is a must for road trips).

Have your car completely checked out before you leave, change the fluids, replace the tires if necessary, have them check the belts, brakes, all fluids, etc.

Have fun. Rememebr if you drive at night, you will not see anything but the road and you will miss the opportunity to see what a glorious country we have. Night driving also puts more strain on your eyes.
And a 24 pack of bottled water!

BTW, some items on your list reminded me of something I heard on the news a short while ago...
Man was pulled over and inside his trunk the police found
"rope, a knife, two wire hangers, duct tape,
pliers, and a hammer"

Just being cheeky... It's a good practical list and I'll refer to it myself next time we plan a long road trip! We have an uncle that just moved to Houston!
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