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Old 11-25-2017, 05:32 PM
 
5,381 posts, read 8,132,836 times
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FWIW, Rancho Mission Viejo residents are also close to the Prima Deshecha Landfill. Maybe the landfill poses no problems.

https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Prim...6!2d33.5264704
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Old 11-25-2017, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Laguna Niguel, Orange County CA
9,809 posts, read 10,238,927 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacific2 View Post
FWIW, Rancho Mission Viejo residents are also not too far from the Prima Deshecha Landfill. Maybe the landfill poses no problems.
Funny you should mention landfills. I know someone who purchased near the Irvine landfill. The buyer didn't seem concerned. It seems buyers are blind to all of this. All they see is "new house" and cannot imagine why there was no development there before.
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Old 11-25-2017, 05:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by LuvSouthOC View Post
Funny you should mention landfills. I know someone who purchased near the Irvine landfill. The buyer didn't seem concerned. It seems buyers are blind to all of this. All they see if "new house" and cannot imagine why there was no development there before.
People often overlook potential problems like that during the excitement of buying a new home.
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Old 11-25-2017, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Laguna Niguel, Orange County CA
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The strongest support for building infill projects comes from Millennials and Gen X.

From the article:
The strongest support for building more housing comes from Millennials (66 percent) and Generation X (68 percent), but Baby Boomers and the Silent Generation (58 percent) are also supportive. The have-nots are also most supportive, 69 percent of those with only a high school education, 71 percent of those making under $40k, 73 percent of renters, and 84 percent of non-citizens.

Housing costs push Californians around Capitol Weekly | Capitol Weekly | Capitol Weekly: The Newspaper of California State Government and Politics.
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Old 11-26-2017, 07:41 AM
 
18,174 posts, read 14,794,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuvSouthOC View Post
The strongest support for building infill projects comes from Millennials and Gen X.

From the article:
The strongest support for building more housing comes from Millennials (66 percent) and Generation X (68 percent), but Baby Boomers and the Silent Generation (58 percent) are also supportive. The have-nots are also most supportive, 69 percent of those with only a high school education, 71 percent of those making under $40k, 73 percent of renters, and 84 percent of non-citizens.
Housing costs push Californians around Capitol Weekly | Capitol Weekly | Capitol Weekly: The Newspaper of California State Government and Politics.
Understandable, they want to live where they want to live. Unfortunately life is changing and it is unlikely that unless they make a LOT, that they will get to live there. Even the housing infill is costing so much they cannot afford it. No cheap housing is ever going to be built in the popular areas of SoCal.
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Old 11-26-2017, 07:14 PM
 
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One of the biggest problems is Millennials want a life like their parents had. Ain't gonna happen.

In the 50's and 60's lower middle class in CA could afford to buy a home in OC. Today even the middle, middle class has a hard time buying and the upper middle class is seeing prices rise beyond their abilities. Building more multi family buildings will not drop the costs and the salaries Millennials will be making in general will not keep up with the COL in the desirable areas of CA. It wasn't that way for their parents, but it is reality now. Unless you bought a home 6 years or more ago (Excepting the mid years of the 1st decade) you will have a hard time now as CA has changed due to the number of people living in CA and wanting to live in CA.

Millennials have to be prepared to live a different life in CA and a more expensive one, if they can live in CA at all. No way to fix that, unlike for Baby Boomers who lived in a different CA and different economic times. Ca is way different now than it was for them.
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Old 11-26-2017, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Laguna Niguel, Orange County CA
9,809 posts, read 10,238,927 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by expatCA View Post
One of the biggest problems is Millennials want a life like their parents had. Ain't gonna happen.

In the 50's and 60's lower middle class in CA could afford to buy a home in OC. Today even the middle, middle class has a hard time buying and the upper middle class is seeing prices rise beyond their abilities. Building more multi family buildings will not drop the costs and the salaries Millennials will be making in general will not keep up with the COL in the desirable areas of CA. It wasn't that way for their parents, but it is reality now. Unless you bought a home 6 years or more ago (Excepting the mid years of the 1st decade) you will have a hard time now as CA has changed due to the number of people living in CA and wanting to live in CA.

Millennials have to be prepared to live a different life in CA and a more expensive one, if they can live in CA at all. No way to fix that, unlike for Baby Boomers who lived in a different CA and different economic times. Ca is way different now than it was for them.
Millennials do indeed harken back to a bygone era, one no doubt described to them by their parents, and this is particularly the case if the Millennials were raised here. The problem is that, as you have described, this is not the same state it once was. There are many policies at work here, including policies to stop construction, which Millennials seem to believe is the only factor at play. There is also enormous immigration pressure, both legal and illegal.

More undocumented immigrants live in Southern California than anywhere else in the United States.

California gives immigrants here illegally unprecedented rights ...

More than a quarter of California residents are immigrants.

And acting as though California were not already wildly popular with illegal immigrants and legal immigrants (it is!), Brown pushes for more benefits for both groups in the interest of "promoting integration" into California.

From the article below:

Other state and local efforts to facilitate the integration of immigrants into civil society, which are wholly consistent with federal law, might include, but are not limited to the following:
Pursuing additional policies that encourage the cooperation of immigrants with criminal law
enforcement authorities;
Ensuring adequate access to English-as-second-language programs so that immigrants are better able
to acquire English language skills and better assimilate into U.S. society;
Providing that immigrants, including undocumented immigrants, are generally eligible for state and local licenses necessary to engage in certain professions and occupations (from building contractors to hair dressers) and more fully participate in the American economy; and
Making noncitizens eligible for public benefits programs that are part of the economic safety net for other residents.


https://boomcalifornia.com/2017/10/2...rican-society/

Maybe millennials should look at changing some of these policies that make property in desirable areas very expensive.

Last edited by LuvSouthOC; 11-26-2017 at 07:48 PM..
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Old 11-26-2017, 11:14 PM
 
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The tragedy of the commons. Like I said, if Millennials or their parents would have taken a basic economics course in college, they would have realized that all socialized entitlement programs fail because of the Tragedy of the Commons. Human nature is 100% predictable in this case. Illegal immigrants are only doing what is the best for them despite their actions (with Democrat help) hurting everyone else.
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Old 11-27-2017, 10:57 AM
 
Location: CA
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I am a millenial and I am leaving OC. I was born in LA but have lived in Orange since then. Never realized how expensive it was until I finally moved out of my mom's house this year and now living in Irvine. This is definitely not going to work out. If you are single, live a moderate, conservative lifestyle and have few debts, you could probably live on $50,000 a year here. You wouldn't save much of anything, but you could get by. Even with a college degree, I find it very hard to find a job with that salary. Mostly I've worked retail and even spent years as a custodian for Cal State Fullerton. The benefits and retirement were great, but the pay was low (about 30k a year). I just listened to an audiobook called, "A Better Life For Half The Price." It's about Americans who live abroad, comfortably, on less than half of what they were paying in the United States, in places like Ecuador and Mexico. The cost of quality medical care is about 10% or less of what you pay here. If you had a job you could do remotely or were a freelancer, $1,000 a month could have you living very comfortably in many places in Mexico. Some places can allow a lifestyle on even less, as rents can be easily found for less than $300 a month. At this point, I think I'm going to try to leverage earning U.S. currency on a job I can do remotely (call center, customer service, sales, transcriptionist, data entry, virtual assistant) and live off the wages in Mexico. Orange County is truly awesome, but as others have said here, it's not the land of easy opportunity it was for our grandparents. I don't know many people my age who have $140,000 saved for a down payment on a house, although I did read a thread here about a man a few years older than me who was making $155,000 a year. If I was making that kind of money, I would have no problem staying in Orange County. It's a beautiful place and a place where you can leverage good money, looks, and materialism to make good contacts and probably get a beautiful girlfriend. But if you're not keeping up with everyone else, it can be hard here. Just ask the employed homeless (a few of them with Master degrees) living by Angel Stadium. As for me, I'm just looking for a low stress quality of life. It's clear I'm never going to get that in Orange County unless I become a CEO. I've actually vomited in my car rushing to get from one job to another trying to cobble together enough money to pay rent for the room I'm renting and to eat. I'd rather just "retire" on a beach in Mexico and earn a modest living working remotely, teaching English, or bartending (or all three provided I had a work permit) than continue to struggle here. Without a good job and good social connections, finding a significant other here can be rough. I'll always love this place but it's time for greener pastures for now. If I somehow find a skill that would allow me to earn six figures, I would come back.
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Old 11-27-2017, 11:35 AM
 
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my advise is follow the money, if you like to live in high cost areas.


don't follow what your interest is. that's why brain is above the heart.


even Spielberg have to make B movies before he made artsy movies
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