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Old 01-11-2009, 08:50 PM
 
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Default Infant day care costs in Orange County?

What are you paying and for what level of service? Is your baby at a professional day care center with a bunch of other kids or in someone's home with just a few kids?
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Old 01-11-2009, 09:04 PM
 
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It depends on the age, <3 is more expensive.

For a 1yr old We paid $600-650/mo for in home at someone's house. When the wife went Part Time with our second we paid about $600/mo to have a woman come to the house 3 days a week.
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Old 01-12-2009, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Denver
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KinderCare which provides only 1 care package from 6am-6pm daily for infants...is 300.00 a week.
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Old 01-12-2009, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Orange County, California
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For infants & toddlers (up to 4 yrs old):

Centers range from $300-500 per week for full-time.
In-homes vary, depending on the amount of kids and level of care (experience, education, etc). I used to pay $200/wk in a home with 10 kids (3 infants and 7 school-aged kids) - don't worry, she had employees and her backyard was a playground. The school kids were only there from 3-5 anyway.

But my husband just decided to work nights so he could be home with the kids during the day and it's going great so far! We should have done it a long time ago.
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Old 01-12-2009, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan and Sometimes Orange County CA
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We tried everything. We had live in nannies. In home care from individuals. Day care centers, Church centers,. You name it. What proved most economical for us was my wife quit working and stayed home. Once you factor in taxes, dry cleaning, clothing, meals, gas, housecleaning, day care, and all of the myriad other things that you have to pay for when both spouses work, it was almost a push for her to stay home. Plus the kids get far better care. No one lives them like mommy.

Costs varied. Live in nannies were the cheapest running around $500/month plus room and board. A friend who watched our kids along with her own was the next most economical at about $500 per month without room and board. Day care centers were very expensive and montessori schools were insane (as much as $800/month). We had twins, so day care centers and schools were double. Later we had more kids. I do nto think that we could have gotten by if my wife continued to work.
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Old 01-12-2009, 05:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
What proved most economical for us was my wife quit working and stayed home.
That's part of what I've trying to get a handle on. I'm wondering at what income level does it make sense to work vs. stay at home. Obviously, if one spouse only makes $10/hr while the other one makes enough for the family, it makes no sense for the lesser-earning spouse to work and pay for day care. But as the income rises you eventually hit a break even point above which you're better off both working full time and paying for child care. Well, better off economically. I don't think its the best idea to pay hundreds of dollar a month to a stranger to raise your kid 12 hours a day if it can be avoided.

What do you think that break even point might be?
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Old 01-12-2009, 06:28 PM
 
Location: appleton, wi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EscapeCalifornia View Post

What do you think that break even point might be?
Hard to say. Even here in the land of affordable living (WI), we paid $19010.80 for day care last year (two kids). We both have professional jobs so we come out much further ahead by working. Using someone's example above of $300/week (or $14400 annually) for a professional daycare, I'd guess that if the second income is over $20K net you might be better off working.

Another thing to consider is how difficult it may be for that second spouse to get into the professional workforce after taking years off. Not that I value work over kids, entirely the opposite. But it's hard enough sometimes when you're already there! Seems like employers really have a thing for fresh grads So if it's close and you have child care that you can be happy with, might be wise to work.
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Old 01-12-2009, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Hollywood North
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yo vanilla View Post
Another thing to consider is how difficult it may be for that second spouse to get into the professional workforce after taking years off. Not that I value work over kids, entirely the opposite. But it's hard enough sometimes when you're already there! Seems like employers really have a thing for fresh grads So if it's close and you have child care that you can be happy with, might be wise to work.
This is very true. I've seen this numerous times. The stay at home parent is ready to go back to work only to realize it is not that easy after being out of the game for several years.
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Old 01-13-2009, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan and Sometimes Orange County CA
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You also have to factor in the value of the impact on your children. What is it worth to have a stranger there for their first steps, first words, or to have your child bonded to a stranger?

On a strcitly financial basis, you need to look at:

After tax income.
Medical benefits if your employer does not cover family.

vs.
child care
dry cleaning
lunches or other meals at work
gasoline
housecleaning
extra cellular telephone. (you can scrap the cell phone if you stay at home, but most will not want to).

Added expenses for care when your child is out of school, sick or your care provider is sick or otherwise unavailble.

For us, it was a push when my wife was making $33,000/year, but we had two kids (then three, then four, then five).

There is a lot of hassle factors that you cannot value. The hassle of finding care providers when you need to change (it is very rare to have only one provider for their entire childhood). The hassle of dealing with getting things done during the day. (E.G. who will meet the plumber when he comes? or who will take in an pick up dry cleaning, do banking, get the car smogged, etc.) Who will take your child to various doctor and dentist appointments? When they are in school who will attend the dance, song, or speech performances and awards ceremonies at 3 p.m.? Are you going to pay someone to go sit through those terminally boring recitals at some elementary school? Are you going to leave your child totally unsupported at such events?
All of that gets easier when one parent stays home.

Going back to work is unquestionably hard, but not impossible. However, once you get used to living on one income, the stay at home spouse can take any pleasant or convenient job when they return to work. You will not need the moeny, you can just put it all away for college.

My wife did substitute teaching for a while, and now works at the local library. The pay is pitiful, but it is an big increase over $0, so it helps, and the hours allow her to be home most of the time when the kids get home.
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Old 01-13-2009, 10:05 AM
 
Location: appleton, wi
1,357 posts, read 3,460,818 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
You also have to factor in the value of the impact on your children. What is it worth to have a stranger there for their first steps, first words, or to have your child bonded to a stranger?

On a strcitly financial basis, you need to look at:

After tax income.
Medical benefits if your employer does not cover family.

vs.
child care
dry cleaning
lunches or other meals at work
gasoline
housecleaning
extra cellular telephone. (you can scrap the cell phone if you stay at home, but most will not want to).

Added expenses for care when your child is out of school, sick or your care provider is sick or otherwise unavailble.

For us, it was a push when my wife was making $33,000/year, but we had two kids (then three, then four, then five).

There is a lot of hassle factors that you cannot value. The hassle of finding care providers when you need to change (it is very rare to have only one provider for their entire childhood). The hassle of dealing with getting things done during the day. (E.G. who will meet the plumber when he comes? or who will take in an pick up dry cleaning, do banking, get the car smogged, etc.) Who will take your child to various doctor and dentist appointments? When they are in school who will attend the dance, song, or speech performances and awards ceremonies at 3 p.m.? Are you going to pay someone to go sit through those terminally boring recitals at some elementary school? Are you going to leave your child totally unsupported at such events?
All of that gets easier when one parent stays home.
It's easy to make it work. The positive aspects of daycare are the social interactions of the kids. Otherwise for us, anyhow, my kids would have nearly no friends at all.

There's no right answer, there's too many situational factors. Not to point a finger, but I wonder about some of he things you listed. Extra cell phone line costs me $10/month. Housecleaning and dry cleaning? We do it ourselves. Pack our own lunches regardless; otherwise you're looking at spending a couple hundred a month on eating out and gaining weight from all that extra food anyhow. That goes to show that it's easy to spend way more money than is really neccessary! Further if we need to go to a doctor appt, school function, meet Joe the plumber, we leave work early that day or use some vacation time.

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