U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-31-2007, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
1,848 posts, read 6,370,774 times
Reputation: 1395

Advertisements

I don't know if any of you have noticed the southeast corner of Oregon is just about empty of people. There is a small city down there called Jordan Valley and nothing else. Jorden valley only has a 239 population. I've never been there.

When you drive south on highway 395 after the city of Burns and Hines it is empty. I have driven down that way once on the way to Nevada. It's a long lonely stretch. If you were to go southeast it's a very lonely place.

Do you think this area will ever get more population? I'm wondering why it's so empty in the first place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-31-2007, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Some where on the pacific coast
185 posts, read 696,793 times
Reputation: 68
I have been to Oregon's outback a few times myself. Eastern Oregon is as you say very lonely. I think much of the land out there is under the control of the BLM so if that is the case they will control development. It would be a great place to locate state and federal prisons as that would spark up the local economy. With out some kind of industry it will never become populated IMHO
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2007, 11:38 PM
 
5,765 posts, read 10,614,697 times
Reputation: 3821
That part of the state is not really suitable for agriculture, because it is too dry. In fact, the environment is fairly bleak all over that section of northern Nevada and southwest Idaho. The landscape is interesting, but it is very remote and lonely.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2007, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
14,398 posts, read 13,952,286 times
Reputation: 23397
Quote:
Originally Posted by tablemtn View Post
That part of the state is not really suitable for agriculture, because it is too dry. In fact, the environment is fairly bleak all over that section of northern Nevada and southwest Idaho. The landscape is interesting, but it is very remote and lonely.
I think the area is known as the Black Rock Desert. Most people think the Black Rock Desert is in Nevada, but the desert was there long before the state line was. It's too far from any major rivers for large water projects, so it will never be developed.

Someday, the feds will have to start turning loose of land in the West, but I expect that the political pressure to privatize desert will be minimal for a long time yet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2007, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
1,795 posts, read 3,777,772 times
Reputation: 2452
That's the Geologists Playground over there. Old volcanic area and just south in the Virgin Valley, Nevada, opal mines.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2007, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
1,848 posts, read 6,370,774 times
Reputation: 1395
Well I think Chewy has a good idea. Putting a prison out there would be just the thing. The land is not used for much and a lot of cities do not want a prison.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2007, 10:33 PM
 
5,765 posts, read 10,614,697 times
Reputation: 3821
It's probably too remote for a prison. Can you really recruit 500 employees (or however many it takes to run a major prison) to go live out in the emptiness past Burns Junction?

Anyhow, if you want to see some very interesting and remote scenery, there is actually a dirt/gravel road with no services that runs along the Oregon/Idaho border about a mile north of the Nevada border.

This region is VERY remote. Just to get there, you need to take unmarked backroads for about 50 miles from the tiny OR/NV border town of McDermitt. You cross the McDermitt Indian Reservation and then head out onto a series of rural roads with no services until you reach the border with Idaho. The scenery is incredible, but in order to do this, you need:

-Extra gas for your vehicle, just in case

-Extra food, water, and cold-weather clothes, in case you get stranded

-A full-sized spare tire, and maybe another donut spare along with it

-If you can, bring a radio and antenna with you so you can call for help in case of emergency, since there is no cellphone service. Combined with a GPS unit, you will know your own location.

-A GOOD atlas of the region. At LEAST the De Lorme Gazateer for Oregon, but maybe also more detailed topo maps of the area.

-A shotgun and ammunition for animal defense.

-A camera! You'll want to take photos of this scenery that few people in America have ever seen before.

-Snow chains. Believe it or not, you can find patches of snow on some of the mountainous areas even in the summer.

-A tent and firestarting materials, along with a camp stove, in case you need to spend a few nights sleeping outside.

-Water purification tablets or filter. If you get stranded and find a natural water source, you'll want to use that before dipping into your emergency supply.

-A fishing pole. Not really for survival, but just for fun.

-A raft, if you are into that. There is some good whitewater out there, but make sure you scout ahead for hazards.

-A bike. It's an amazing feeling to go shooting down the slope of a dunelike hill through the cool fresh air, without a single sign of human habitation in sight.

If you take these precautions, you can safely explore this remote region of Oregon, and you will have some tales to tell when finished.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2007, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
14,398 posts, read 13,952,286 times
Reputation: 23397
That sounds like a great road trip! A decade or so ago I saw a description of the location for the Oregon Star Party that sounded a lot like that. I didn't go, but I think the flyer described 50 miles of unimproved road to access the site, and recommended spare tires for both vehicles and travel trailers.

That reminds me - I need to install red LED lighting in my travel trailer...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2007, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Baker City, Oregon
4,037 posts, read 6,227,689 times
Reputation: 6896
If I remember correctly, this was the part of Oregon where the people taking the 1990 census got lost and disappeared for a few days.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2007, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Stuck in NE GA right now
4,585 posts, read 11,253,894 times
Reputation: 6620
I used to go out that way for camping trips and exploring...I actually went on a horse camping trip...remote but fun. At least my idea of fun.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:39 PM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top