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Old 12-20-2018, 12:45 AM
 
Location: Northern California
1,959 posts, read 984,792 times
Reputation: 3128

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there's a state university in Olympia.... maybe some of those guys wearing beards and flannel were professors?
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Old 12-20-2018, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Olympia area (for now)
2,075 posts, read 854,974 times
Reputation: 4589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
I think you're being too hard on yourself. If he pushed buying a home instead of renting for awhile to see if it's a good fit, he bears some responsibility for this disastrous move. Renting for awhile is really smart, and with his job being portable, you're in a good position to try out different communities.

Not really interested in analyzing Greenman, but I will say that although he uses words extremely well, the personal angst is palatable. I don't think he stuck around here long; made a few posts about how Oregon sucks and then ran who knows where.

I have no idea of whether McMinnville is right for you, but you may have less chance of running into mattresses in front yards in wine country than in Olympia. Too bad he's hellbent on staying on the West Coast because some of those towns in upstate New York sound pretty nice.
His reasoning was that he didn’t want to rent and move again. I should have followed my intuition and insisted we rent and get to know this state first. It would been easier to do a move without having this expensive house, but at least it’s a beautiful property and should sell easily. We didn’t plan this move as well as we should, although I’ve since learned a lot about Washington and have a much better understanding of the culture here.

We need to be closer in to a city so McMinville was a thought, since it’s less than an hour from Portland. Where we live now is close to two hours for SeaTac. He needs to be fairly close to a major airport for business trips. Spouse is not a snow person, so upstate New York wouldn’t work for him. I love snow and would love a place where it snows all winter, but I’m willing to compromise on that.
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Old 12-20-2018, 10:56 AM
 
Location: WA
3,844 posts, read 4,855,448 times
Reputation: 4993
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taz22 View Post
His reasoning was that he didn’t want to rent and move again. I should have followed my intuition and insisted we rent and get to know this state first. It would been easier to do a move without having this expensive house, but at least it’s a beautiful property and should sell easily. We didn’t plan this move as well as we should, although I’ve since learned a lot about Washington and have a much better understanding of the culture here.

We need to be closer in to a city so McMinville was a thought, since it’s less than an hour from Portland. Where we live now is close to two hours for SeaTac. He needs to be fairly close to a major airport for business trips. Spouse is not a snow person, so upstate New York wouldn’t work for him. I love snow and would love a place where it snows all winter, but I’m willing to compromise on that.
I think your problem is that there really isn't any culture of upscale rural horse country in the Pacific Northwest. The upscale areas with wealthy professional types are mostly urban/suburban or coastal (Lake Oswego, Mercer Island, Cannon Beach, San Juan Islands, etc.

The Northwest doesn't really have places like the horse country of Maryland and Northern Virginia, or the Blue Grass country around Lexington KY, or Saratoga Springs, NY, or the ranch lands around places like Santa Barbara. Or the Hill Country of TX. There are plenty of places in the US where you can have an upscale rural lifestyle with lots of horses and like minded wealthy neighbors who share the same aestetic of tidy horse barns, manicured pastures with rail fences, and picturesque country lanes. Where you won't ever have to see a double wide trailer or an old mattress in the yard. The Northwest is just not one of those places.

There has never really been any culture of "gentlemen farmers" in the Northwest. Up where you live in Olympia it was mostly stump farms. The railroads came through and captured massive forest holdings through land grants, clearcut the lowlands 150 years ago, and sold off the resulting "stump farms" to dirt poor migrants who broke their backs trying to carve out struggling farms by clearing out the stumps one by one.

You'd be better off looking east of the Cascades to places like the Methow Valley in WA



or Sisters OR



if you want nice open horse country with wealthy neighbors. But of course that will put you a lot further away from cities and airports.

You might find some small expensive close-in horse properties in places like Wilsonville OR or Hockinson WA where you won't see any downscale neighbors. But you will pay for the privilege. For example: https://www.horseproperties.net/prop...+Prairie/30259 or
Moderator cut: link removed, competitor site

Last edited by Yac; 12-27-2018 at 01:51 AM..
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Old 12-20-2018, 10:57 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
25,250 posts, read 33,183,633 times
Reputation: 52076
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taz22 View Post
I matters to me if my neighbors do drugs and dump mattresses in the front yard. ...................

............ if there is a shortage of jobs in an area, you’d think that ambitious men and women would be jumping at the chance to train in a field that could bring them a very lucrative income.
Wow. That is a shame. You bought a beautiful house in a beautiful neighborhood and after you moved in, the neighbors brought out their old matresses and dead cars and moved them into their front yards. That was really bad luck.

When the real estate market crashed and building stopped, all the construction workers moved to places where they could still find work. Oregon came late to the recovery, so they still had jobs elsewhere and they never moved back

A strong young person working a cash register can't wake up tomorrow morning and start installing roofs. Construction requires serious work skills and construction workers have a lot of job training before they can do construction jobs. There's a shortage of old contractors to train them.

Last edited by oregonwoodsmoke; 12-20-2018 at 11:12 AM..
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Old 12-20-2018, 11:24 AM
 
Location: WA
3,844 posts, read 4,855,448 times
Reputation: 4993
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Wow. That is a shame. You bought a beautiful house in a beautiful neighborhood and after you moved in, the neighbors brought out their old matresses and dead cars and moved them into their front yards. That was really bad luck.

When the real estate market crashed and building stopped, all the construction workers moved to places where they could still find work. Oregon came late to the recovery, so they still had jobs elsewhere and they never moved back

A strong young person working a cash register can't wake up tomorrow morning and start installing roofs. Construction requires serious work skills and construction workers have a lot of job training before they can do construction jobs. There's a shortage of old contractors to train them.
And existing construction companies and contractors are also understandably reluctant to put a lot of cash into expanding back up to meet what may very well be short-term demand, especially those who got burned badly the last time around. A lot of contrators and construction companies went bankrupt after over-expanding during the last boom in 2006. If you are running a construction company you don't just hire 10 new guys. You need trucks and equipment like job site generators, lifts, power tools and so forth. There is a lot of investment involved in ramping up any kind of business. Construction is no different.
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Old 12-20-2018, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
14,864 posts, read 14,259,093 times
Reputation: 24075
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
I think your problem is that there really isn't any culture of upscale rural horse country in the Pacific Northwest. The upscale areas with wealthy professional types are mostly urban/suburban or coastal (Lake Oswego, Mercer Island, Cannon Beach, San Juan Islands, etc.

The Northwest doesn't really have places like the horse country of Maryland and Northern Virginia, or the Blue Grass country around Lexington KY, or Saratoga Springs, NY, or the ranch lands around places like Santa Barbara. Or the Hill Country of TX. There are plenty of places in the US where you can have an upscale rural lifestyle with lots of horses and like minded wealthy neighbors who share the same aestetic of tidy horse barns, manicured pastures with rail fences, and picturesque country lanes. Where you won't ever have to see a double wide trailer or an old mattress in the yard. The Northwest is just not one of those places.

There has never really been any culture of "gentlemen farmers" in the Northwest. Up where you live in Olympia it was mostly stump farms. The railroads came through and captured massive forest holdings through land grants, clearcut the lowlands 150 years ago, and sold off the resulting "stump farms" to dirt poor migrants who broke their backs trying to carve out struggling farms by clearing out the stumps one by one.

You'd be better off looking east of the Cascades to places like the Methow Valley in WA



or Sisters OR



if you want nice open horse country with wealthy neighbors. But of course that will put you a lot further away from cities and airports.

You might find some small expensive close-in horse properties in places like Wilsonville OR or Hockinson WA where you won't see any downscale neighbors. But you will pay for the privilege. For example: https://www.horseproperties.net/prop...+Prairie/30259 or
Moderator cut: link removed, competitor site
AAAGHH! Flannel! Flannel!

Last edited by Yac; 12-27-2018 at 01:50 AM..
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Old 12-20-2018, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Olympia area (for now)
2,075 posts, read 854,974 times
Reputation: 4589
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
I think your problem is that there really isn't any culture of upscale rural horse country in the Pacific Northwest. The upscale areas with wealthy professional types are mostly urban/suburban or coastal (Lake Oswego, Mercer Island, Cannon Beach, San Juan Islands, etc.

The Northwest doesn't really have places like the horse country of Maryland and Northern Virginia, or the Blue Grass country around Lexington KY, or Saratoga Springs, NY, or the ranch lands around places like Santa Barbara. Or the Hill Country of TX. There are plenty of places in the US where you can have an upscale rural lifestyle with lots of horses and like minded wealthy neighbors who share the same aestetic of tidy horse barns, manicured pastures with rail fences, and picturesque country lanes. Where you won't ever have to see a double wide trailer or an old mattress in the yard. The Northwest is just not one of those places.

There has never really been any culture of "gentlemen farmers" in the Northwest. Up where you live in Olympia it was mostly stump farms. The railroads came through and captured massive forest holdings through land grants, clearcut the lowlands 150 years ago, and sold off the resulting "stump farms" to dirt poor migrants who broke their backs trying to carve out struggling farms by clearing out the stumps one by one.

You'd be better off looking east of the Cascades to places like the Methow Valley in WA



or Sisters OR



if you want nice open horse country with wealthy neighbors. But of course that will put you a lot further away from cities and airports.

You might find some small expensive close-in horse properties in places like Wilsonville OR or Hockinson WA where you won't see any downscale neighbors. But you will pay for the privilege. For example: https://www.horseproperties.net/prop...+Prairie/30259 or
Moderator cut: link removed, competitor site
You nailed what the problem is, thanks. It’s true there are no real areas of gentleman farmers up here. There are nice homes, but next door is just as likely to have a trailer or shack. This neighborhood has some nice homes, along with plenty of trailers and one or two room shacks. Fortunately, these huge fir trees hide all the mess. It comes down to finding an area that just happens to have a few nice homes together. Unincorporated areas don’t have much appeal. You are spot on, having neighbors with the same aesthetic is important.

The pictures are beautiful! I knew about Sisters, but due to the long distance to PDX, it wouldn’t be feasible. Your name is Texas but you live in WA. I don’t know if you’re a local or moved from Texas but you have a lot of knowledge about WA. Wish I could have talked to you before this move. We moved here to escape the hot summers of Phoenix and there is no going back. The weather at least, is a welcome relief.

I’ve looked at Wilsonville and Sherwood. It’s possible to find a fixer with a few acres for 600 or 700k. His company’s home office is located in the area and he’s been going there for annual company meetings for the last 30 years or so. Spouse has family close to Seattle, we moved to Washington shortly after his parents passed. Being close to a major airport/city is a requirement along with acreage. Couer d’Alene looks interesting although he probably dosen’t want all the snow.

Last edited by Yac; 12-27-2018 at 01:50 AM..
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Old 12-20-2018, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Olympia area (for now)
2,075 posts, read 854,974 times
Reputation: 4589
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Wow. That is a shame. You bought a beautiful house in a beautiful neighborhood and after you moved in, the neighbors brought out their old matresses and dead cars and moved them into their front yards. That was really bad luck.

When the real estate market crashed and building stopped, all the construction workers moved to places where they could still find work. Oregon came late to the recovery, so they still had jobs elsewhere and they never moved back

A strong young person working a cash register can't wake up tomorrow morning and start installing roofs. Construction requires serious work skills and construction workers have a lot of job training before they can do construction jobs. There's a shortage of old contractors to train them.

Of course I didn’t see this entire neighborhood before moving in. Buying a house with people nearby putting all this junk and crap in their front yards, are you kidding? I found the perfect house in Gig Harbor that had a great horse set up and a beautiful chefs kitchen ready to go. Not to mention the fantastic location. I did some checking and found a junkyard nearby along with several trash dumping neighbors. I dropped that house quickly and would have done so with this one, if I’d seen the surrounding area first. The view in front of my house is pasture. In the distance is a row of huge fir trees. The junky street is behind the trees. Next to the house is a hidden drive that I didn’t see and it hides it’s share of horrors too. I did check this area on google earth but nothing really shows up.

As far as the potential to get into the contractor business, I was thinking of apprenticeships, but if there is no one to train them, it’s a different story. Phoenix had lots of contractors and handymen so prices were kept very reasonable. It was a shock to compare those prices with the ones up here.
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Old 12-20-2018, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Just outside of Portland
4,828 posts, read 6,377,515 times
Reputation: 5035
There is a very nice pocket of very expensive horse properties just west of Wilsonville.
Rolling hills, oak trees, nice pastures, white fences, the whole nine yards.
I don't know how much "horse culture" there actually is there, but there are some very beautiful places and very few shacks and trailers.

It must be where you find it.
I know that close to me (outside of Molalla) there is a HUGE place sitting on a hill that looks like a castle with A LOT of property around it and it seems to be a private horse club or maybe somebody that is absolutely filthy rich.
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Old 12-20-2018, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Olympia area (for now)
2,075 posts, read 854,974 times
Reputation: 4589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
AAAGHH! Flannel! Flannel!

Well, there is a disproportionately high number of men who wear them. I know you don’t think twice about it having grown up here. Recently, we were at Home Depot and waiting for the cars to pass so we could park. Along came one guy in a flannel shirt and pickup, then another and another. There were about six or seven guys dressed in flannel, driving trucks and they all had beards, one after the other We looked at each other in amazement. You don’t see that level of sameness anyplace but here. Or maybe the Amish.
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