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Old 03-07-2012, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Rockaway Beach, Oregon
381 posts, read 439,067 times
Reputation: 184
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malibusurfer View Post
Oregon to me has become a close second to California and it's problems.... We ARE a nanny state!! Owning a small business here (for me) is near impossible with all the red tape, DEQ, Enviro's, taxes, etc...
Err, DEQ doesn't (IIRC) exist outside of Multnomah and Washington counties, and what does car pollution regs have to do with small business? More specifically, if I'm missing something about it, I'm more than happy to see any missing facts.

As for the rest? California is 100x worse, Washington requires a labyrinthine pile of sales tax accounting, and don't even ask about most other places.
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Old 03-07-2012, 10:31 PM
 
3,973 posts, read 6,956,423 times
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True about Washington. But keep in mind WA has no state income tax. A big savings for those who earn a moderate to upper income salary.
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Old 03-08-2012, 12:54 AM
 
Location: Ashland, OR
11 posts, read 17,494 times
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Having lived in Pennsylvania for many years, we started our search to move "out west" (anywhere west of the Rockies) in 2007. New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona (sort of) Washington and Oregon were our top choices for places to start researching. After compiling a list of about 10 possible towns among these states, we fairly quickly narrowed the list to three. When all was said and done, we chose southern Oregon for our first trip to check out the area in 2008.

I still remember how amazing our first impressions were to be able to drive endlessly on relatively empty roads lined with tall conifers, break out into breathtaking views of the valleys below, hike through stunning forests, walk along beautiful rivers and beaches and rarely cross paths with another person.

After that first experience in Oregon we never did made it to another town on our wish list. We sold our house a year later and never looked back. We're proud to call Oregon our home and thrilled to be living in Ashland for the last three years. Every chance we get we pack the dog in the car and take off on another magnificent adventure. Life is too short to sit in traffic jams wishing you were somewhere else! I just wish we had made the move 20 years earlier. Like they say around here, if you don't like the weather just wait 15 minutes. Marvelous!
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Old 03-08-2012, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Southern Oregon
1,828 posts, read 1,956,232 times
Reputation: 1225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malibusurfer View Post
Oregon to me has become a close second to California and it's problems.... We ARE a nanny state!! Owning a small business here (for me) is near impossible with all the red tape, DEQ, Enviro's, taxes, etc... This state is no longer small business friendly.... If you work for the Gov. your "golden", but I refuse to be a tax consumer... I need to go to a state where small business is promoted, not looked down upon like here... I am not happy leaving, but you have to do what you have to do for your family ya know...... You can change perception, but that does not put food on the table...
Oregon hasn't near the problem that the people in California have, yes, Oregon is enviromentally conscious, the people of Oregon love their state the way it is and will do most anything to protect it. The majority of business in Oregon are small businesses, the large companies left when Oregon passes its enviromental laws, it does make it tough but it is worth it. The only thing I would change here in Oregon is the federal owned lands, this strangles the counties as far as revenue goes.

If your into a business that impacts the enviroment then your going to have to show that the impact is at a minimum and you can be sure that someone wlll be watching. The days of doing what one chooses to the enviroment are over, Oregon is one of the most enviromentally aware states in the nation for a reason. I'm no tree hugger, however, one can not destroy their rescources and then call foul, one has to understand that "we people" are not the only earthlings that live on this planet.
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Old 03-08-2012, 10:14 AM
 
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It's also not a great state to be in for small-scale alcohol producers, microbreweries, etc. From what I understand it's very hard for them to turn any decent kind of profit here.
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Old 03-08-2012, 10:33 AM
 
5,567 posts, read 7,859,732 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pw72 View Post
True about Washington. But keep in mind WA has no state income tax. A big savings for those who earn a moderate to upper income salary.
This didn't work for us. People say this all the time and we used to believe it. Hubby makes 6 figures. In our experience - we have lived in four different states WA, CA, OR, and Texas - we've paid the least amount in taxes in Oregon - state and fed combined. I'm going by percentages. (total tax owed divided by total taxable income X 100) I'm not the greatest mathematician so if that's a bad formula to use for state-by-state comparison let me know!

Hubby earned more in Washington state but we felt a whole lot more cash poor... everything from food to housing to even entertainment was more expensive there. It was a stressful time.

PLUS... you gotta drive A L L the W A Y around that dang peninsula to see the real coast. lol In Oregon it's a straight shot and presto... you're there... AND it's protected. Washington beaches are not as nice.

We are very happy to be back in Oregon!
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Old 03-08-2012, 10:55 AM
 
9,649 posts, read 6,708,363 times
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The first time I visited Oregon I was a seven-year-old driving with my family up from California while we moving to Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. We drove up around the east side of the Cascades through Klamath Falls up towards Bend where we stayed at The Riverhouse right on the Deschutes. My memory was that I thought Oregon was all like Central Oregon, dry high desert interspersed with pine forests and volcanic landscapes. I loved it at the time, but realized later that wasn't what the other side of Oregon was like.

When I was a little older after I returned to the States, I went on another trip around Oregon in the summer with my family. I remember driving up to Eugene over McKenzie Pass--with the snowbanks fairly still high on either side, but the road just opened in July, stopping for a walk further down on the McKenzie River. Then I remember walking around Washington Park in Portland---looking at the city surrounded by the forest or more so a forest that just happened to have a city in the middle of it or at least that's how it seemed to me at the time.. On the way back we stopped in Ashland(where I first moved to in Oregon) and it just seemed so nice, with the little downtown and balmy summer weather yet at the foot of the Siskiyous. I remember thinking that people I met seemed friendlier on that trip, and everything in the summer seemed so lush and verdant. And I can recall staring at the still snowcapped mountains in the Cascades and thinking I wanted to come back and climb and explore those peaks. I just remember thinking on that trip, that Oregon was a place I could possibly move to some day. Years later when I was 18, I made that decision and I've been here ever since, and climbed most of those mountains...
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Old 03-08-2012, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
542 posts, read 569,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
The first time I visited Oregon I was a seven-year-old driving with my family up from California while we moving to Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. We drove up around the east side of the Cascades through Klamath Falls up towards Bend where we stayed at The Riverhouse right on the Deschutes. My memory was that I thought Oregon was all like Central Oregon, dry high desert interspersed with pine forests and volcanic landscapes. I loved it at the time, but realized later that wasn't what the other side of Oregon was like.

When I was a little older after I returned to the States, I went on another trip around Oregon in the summer with my family. I remember driving up to Eugene over McKenzie Pass--with the snowbanks fairly still high on either side, but the road just opened in July, stopping for a walk further down on the McKenzie River. Then I remember walking around Washington Park in Portland---looking at the city surrounded by the forest or more so a forest that just happened to have a city in the middle of it or at least that's how it seemed to me at the time.. On the way back we stopped in Ashland(where I first moved to in Oregon) and it just seemed so nice, with the little downtown and balmy summer weather yet at the foot of the Siskiyous. I remember thinking that people I met seemed friendlier on that trip, and everything in the summer seemed so lush and verdant. And I can recall staring at the still snowcapped mountains in the Cascades and thinking I wanted to come back and climb and explore those peaks. I just remember thinking on that trip, that Oregon was a place I could possibly move to some day. Years later when I was 18, I made that decision and I've been here ever since, and climbed most of those mountains...
How cool is that? The furthest west I ever got growing up was Kansas!! Glad I finally made it out here to enjoy the longest "staycation" of my life.
Love the McKenzie River. Went to Clear Lake for the first time a couple of years ago and was mesmerized by the underwater forest and the "tidybowl blue" color of the McKenzie River. Stunning! Thanks so much for sharing!!
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Old 03-22-2012, 08:13 AM
 
41 posts, read 52,886 times
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My husband and I are both native Oregonians and proud of it. Most of my years have been spent in either the Eugene/Springfield area or on the Coast near Coos Bay. I'm more than ready to leave the coast after 3 decades, and returning to my roots - the McKenzie River area would be heavenly!

When you come to the age, and circumstance in life when you truly can choose to be anywhere in the world; when your occupation affords you the liberty to come and go, stay, move, or work indoors or out... sometimes deciding where to land for a length of time is tough. But regardless of where we travel, it still takes my breath away just as it did as a youngster when I come across the Cascades on 126 heading East. When you come across the mountain top and into the lush, green, and over-the-top gorgeous country (and if you happen on a fabulous sunset it's a bonus) there's something magical that happens inside. It's home. It's the BEST of everything in one state. (Okay so there are some things I would change if in charge, but since I'm not - let's go with what I know...) We do love to travel, but invariably, we always love to come "home". Our home is Oregon. No matter where life leads us... Oregon will always be our home!

Now... with the number of hidden secrets of intense beauty most every little town offers if one looks, I have to admit some towns hide it more than others. When driving Highway 101, there is more beauty to behold than imaginable. It's well worth the extra hours to take the coast highway - and if you plan right, there's also some of the finest food, golf, and fun to be had along the way.

I don't recommend LIVING here (on the coast), but could certainly share some insights to how best to visit. Some towns you'll have to ask locals, since little seems inviting from the actual highway. It would be a real loss to drive through Coos Bay and not take in some of the hidden treasures. (Buy your gas in Florence and make a day of it.) Parks, trails, beaches (be careful), lakes, waterfalls, bridges, wildlife, estuaries... the town does a fine job of hiding it's real treasure.

Here's my honest thoughts about Oregon: Any location here is likely to beat most locations elsewhere. I've been elsewhere. Always came home. Always will... I'm guessing. Anyplace in Oregon is home to me.
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Old 03-22-2012, 08:41 AM
 
Location: the Beaver State
6,478 posts, read 5,786,608 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haggardhouseelf View Post
It's also not a great state to be in for small-scale alcohol producers, microbreweries, etc. From what I understand it's very hard for them to turn any decent kind of profit here.
Why is Oregon #2 per capita in number of breweries, and #3 in total number of breweries in the US?

And why does Oregon have 46 distilleries as of 2010, while California doesn't even have half that many?

There are 336,072 small businesses in Oregon, "They represent 97.7 percent of all employers and employ 56.2 percent of the private-sector workforce. (http://www.sba.gov/sites/default/files/or11.pdf - broken link)" and account for $19.9 Billion Dollars of Oregon's total payroll, or 35.4%, in 2008 that number was 346,057 (http://www.sba.gov/sites/default/files/files/or10.pdf - broken link). So despite the bad economic times in the past four years, there are only about 10,000 less small businesses in the State.

On a more local note, the number of Food Carts in Portland was 441 in 2009, it was over 600 in 2010, and is 689 in December 2011.

This is a real question. I see people throw stuff out like this all the time "Oregon is bad for business," "Oregon's environmental laws are unfriendly," "Oregon's business taxes are too high." Yet when you examine the number of businesses that exist, you seem to see the exact opposite.

I owned a small business in Oregon at one point. All my issues (and the reason I went out of business,) were self made and not due to over taxation or environmental regulations that stifled innovation and growth.

Please explain to me what I'm missing!
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