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Old 01-15-2019, 03:32 PM
 
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Thanks for the replies. I decided against a beach house a few years ago before this subduction thing was even on my radar; fortunately, I ended up outside of the tsunami zone. I do think about moving farther inland sometimes, but this wouldn't be the only, or even primary, consideration. I like Baker City a lot and sometimes wish I lived there again, but I like to be closer to an airport.
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Old 01-15-2019, 07:45 PM
 
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Regarding questions about the coast, the following turned me around: Bay City Oregon mayor’s report (left column): Earthquake, tsunami and fire safety in Bay City It gets graphic, but is a tribute to little Bay City’s Mayor for having the courage and foresight to warn her town.

The thing about the sunami warning sirens, if there’s a break off your coast, the devastation from a 9+ quake will be the first thing that happens, not the wave. With that, coastal roads and bridges will have crumbled. So not much chance of escaping beyond the 20 minute lead time before the wave.

Also, I’m not sure the recoil & sinking of ground closest to the shore is taken into account as towns have mapped out their sunami safe zones. When I was looking at homes in both Bay City & Garibaldi, city officials seemed very sketchy about how they arrived at the newly painted sunami wave heights around town. At Garibaldi City Hall the clerk described how their fire & police departments (same building as city hall) “Still need relocated to higher ground!”

If I had to live on the Oregon Coast, up on Newport's north side was likely the safest, barring mudslides from the hills facing the ocean. Everything from the bridge South would be wiped out. I’d be at the Oregon Coast now if it were not for this pending disaster
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Old 01-15-2019, 07:53 PM
 
124 posts, read 139,530 times
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Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
If you have an hour to spend, there is an excellent lecture on YouTube by Nick Zentner ...
Other than feeling as though I’m being yelled at, I’d already watched the Nick Zentner video you linked - so I watched it again! And though I’m no longer in Oregon, due to ‘the quake,’ I’ve still got my college geology of Oregon books. And, one Zentner video leads to another, and another. Great stuff, if concentrating on Washington

It all makes sense in that Oregon, or the entire West Coast is so new, in comparison to the eastern regions of the continent. And our -- or your magnificent rugged coastline is in that shape for good reason!

Someone mentioned Baker City, I considered it, until learning how short a growing season it had. And another thing I learned from the Zentner video was that east of the cascades is not as immune to a 9 as I’d thought, including Baker City. (watch out Woodsmoke! )
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Old 01-16-2019, 01:03 PM
 
Location: WA
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Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
I sure wouldn't own a beach house. I have an old friend who grew up and lives in Astoria, and we have talked about this. He has a situational awareness and knows how to get above tsunami level anywhere in town. He knows very well that casualties in Warrenton would be near 100%.

I don't let it scare me out of going to the coast for a weekend.
We have a family friend who built their custom beach house on the shoreline in the Depot Bay area and now can't get it sold. Been on the market for over 18 months I think with no results. I don't know how much worries about the big one are affecting sales as there are a lot of inter-related factors that affect the real estate market. But I think people are starting to think about how both earthquakes and climate change are going to affect the coastline long-term.

I don't let it scare me either. But I'd rather rent than buy for that and other reasons. And we like to rent places that are well up above the shoreline, especially in places like Oceanside where most of the houses are way high up out of any Tsunami zone.
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Old 01-16-2019, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
15,293 posts, read 16,425,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oregone View Post
Regarding questions about the coast, the following turned me around: Bay City Oregon mayor’s report (left column): Earthquake, tsunami and fire safety in Bay City It gets graphic, but is a tribute to little Bay City’s Mayor for having the courage and foresight to warn her town.

The thing about the sunami warning sirens, if there’s a break off your coast, the devastation from a 9+ quake will be the first thing that happens, not the wave. With that, coastal roads and bridges will have crumbled. So not much chance of escaping beyond the 20 minute lead time before the wave.

Also, I’m not sure the recoil & sinking of ground closest to the shore is taken into account as towns have mapped out their sunami safe zones. When I was looking at homes in both Bay City & Garibaldi, city officials seemed very sketchy about how they arrived at the newly painted sunami wave heights around town. At Garibaldi City Hall the clerk described how their fire & police departments (same building as city hall) “Still need relocated to higher ground!”

If I had to live on the Oregon Coast, up on Newport's north side was likely the safest, barring mudslides from the hills facing the ocean. Everything from the bridge South would be wiped out. I’d be at the Oregon Coast now if it were not for this pending disaster
Good point. People don't realize that the coast will move 30' west and 10' down. Japan learned this the hard way. Their sea walls were tall enough, until they lost over 3 meters in height. Then the wave came right over the top. A bunch of the simulations that they use for tsunami zones are just wave action simulations. They don't take into account that much of coastal cities will end up under water even without a tidal wave.

Another thing that gets ignored is the big slosh in lakes. A seiche could easily slop 6' of water over the end of low lying lakes like Oswego.
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Old 01-16-2019, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
13,000 posts, read 6,514,685 times
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Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
Good point. People don't realize that the coast will move 30' west and 10' down. Japan learned this the hard way. Their sea walls were tall enough, until they lost over 3 meters in height. Then the wave came right over the top. A bunch of the simulations that they use for tsunami zones are just wave action simulations. They don't take into account that much of coastal cities will end up under water even without a tidal wave.

Another thing that gets ignored is the big slosh in lakes. A seiche could easily slop 6' of water over the end of low lying lakes like Oswego.
Their walls were not high enough. The walls were built to 30 feet height, based on the size of a tsunami that hit the area in 1933. The wave that hit in 2011 was 50 feet high. That is why it topped the walls. The Japanese government's response has been to increase the wall height to 40 feet. If another tsunami the size of the 2011, hits the area again, it will still top the new walls. They are not going to even try to raise the height of the walls to 50 feet, because they know that even bigger tsunamis have hit the area in the past. So it would be a waste of money. No matter how high they build the walls, it just a matter of time before a wave comes over the top of it.

Japan Is Building a 40-foot Wall to Stop Tsunamis _ Smart News _ Smithsonian
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Old 02-04-2019, 03:56 PM
 
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Default Cascadia Subduction Zone

Shooting Stars, I found the documentary very interesting! I've only lived in Oregon for 2 years, heard about staying away from the coast because of earthquakes causing tsunamis. Thanks for sharing!
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Old 02-08-2019, 04:09 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Oregon Michele View Post

Shooting Stars, I found the documentary very interesting! I've only lived in Oregon for 2 years, heard about staying away from the coast because of earthquakes causing tsunamis. Thanks for sharing!
You're welcome.
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Old 02-08-2019, 05:40 PM
 
1,897 posts, read 965,399 times
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I am going out to Newport in about a month to look at places. I am not overly worried about something that could happen in 5 minutes from now or not for another 300 years. I do believe in being prepared in case it does happen though.

Does anybody know what place in Newport to go to for information on if it does happen. Also would appreciate any help on what questions to ask.

I have also read there are geological hazard areas in and around Newport. Would the same place that has tsunami information have the geological reports.

Thanks for any help.
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Old 02-09-2019, 03:50 AM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
13,000 posts, read 6,514,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sam812 View Post
I am going out to Newport in about a month to look at places. I am not overly worried about something that could happen in 5 minutes from now or not for another 300 years. I do believe in being prepared in case it does happen though.

Does anybody know what place in Newport to go to for information on if it does happen. Also would appreciate any help on what questions to ask.

I have also read there are geological hazard areas in and around Newport. Would the same place that has tsunami information have the geological reports.

Thanks for any help.
City of Newport, OR __ Emergency Information
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