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Old 10-17-2018, 06:10 PM
 
22,368 posts, read 29,463,973 times
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LOL @ CL being filled with rentals starting at $500. Maybe in Arkansas, but not the Oregon coast.

I agree with the others about Newport being a better option, but you will have a problem finding affordable, pet-friendly housing.
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Old 10-17-2018, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
8,810 posts, read 3,556,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
LOL @ CL being filled with rentals starting at $500. Maybe in Arkansas, but not the Oregon coast.

I agree with the others about Newport being a better option, but you will have a problem finding affordable, pet-friendly housing.
Obviously you haven't even looked. You have no idea what rents here cost.

$526 / 1br - Now accepting applications for wait list! (Tillamook)

$550 / 2br - 2 Bed/ 1 Bath Duplex, New interior paint/carpet (Myrtle Point)

$575 / 1br - 1 bedroom 1 bath apartment (Coquille)

$580 / 1br - Now Accepting Applications for our waitlist! (Brookings)
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Old 10-17-2018, 07:56 PM
 
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The first one is strictly disabled or 62+ and has income limits.

Second in isn't in a coastal community and doesn't allow pets, and the OP clearly specified that they'd be bringing a dog.

Third isn't in a coastal community. The OP is asking about coastal communities. There also isn't much work in either Myrtle Point or Coquille, though admittedly, that area does seem to have lower rents than towns along the coast.

The fourth is yet another subsidized living community strictly for senior citizens and disabled people, again with income limits.

I'd say it was a nice try, but it wasn't. You're trying to use disabled/senior subsidized housing and non-coastal towns as an example of what the OP might expect to find, but it doesn't work. You're the one who obviously didn't look before you posted.

Last edited by Metlakatla; 10-17-2018 at 08:10 PM..
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Old 10-17-2018, 08:09 PM
 
Location: WA
3,878 posts, read 4,888,741 times
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I didn't look very hard but $1800 for a 1200 sf cottage was the cheapest place for rent on Zillow in Newport. There were only 2 listings under $2000

https://www.zillow.com/homes/make_me...02403158_zpid/
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Old 10-17-2018, 08:18 PM
 
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The cheapest one I saw in Newport on CL was $875 but doesn't allow pets.

Nothing under $1400 a month in Newport that allows pets, but it isn't in a converted motel and doesn't have kitchens.
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Old 10-17-2018, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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I only personally know Brookings, OR, which is a really nice town, just over the CA border. It has decent tourism activity. Has decent weather, overall.
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Old 10-17-2018, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
8,810 posts, read 3,556,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
The first one is strictly disabled or 62+ and has income limits.

Second in isn't in a coastal community and doesn't allow pets, and the OP clearly specified that they'd be bringing a dog.

Third isn't in a coastal community. The OP is asking about coastal communities. There also isn't much work in either Myrtle Point or Coquille, though admittedly, that area does seem to have lower rents than towns along the coast.

The fourth is yet another subsidized living community strictly for senior citizens and disabled people, again with income limits.

I'd say it was a nice try, but it wasn't. You're trying to use disabled/senior subsidized housing and non-coastal towns as an example of what the OP might expect to find, but it doesn't work. You're the one who obviously didn't look before you posted.
OK, you made your point. You can't a beachfront apartment for $500. FYI The Coast is the entire area West of the Oregon Coast Range.

Last edited by Cloudy Dayz; 10-17-2018 at 08:43 PM..
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Old 10-17-2018, 08:41 PM
 
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My point was also that subsidized senior housing with income limits isn't going to work for a couple in their 20s and that it isn't representative of rental costs on the Oregon coast.
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Old 10-18-2018, 07:39 AM
 
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This is all very helpful thank you guys! I suppose my next question would be are there smaller inland towns that might be somewhere to live and commute to a job in a popular tourist town? The first town that looked interesting was Cannon Besch but sounds expensive...wasn't sure if you could live outside of the town but commute in to a restaurant/bar that would be busy in summer season. Do places in coastal towns close in the 'off season'? Here a lot of the town closes from December-February. We are not opposed to living away from the beach (just nearby the coast) if there is employment opportunity in these areas just was thinking touristy towns might be the best bet for making decent restaurant money. Someone had mentioned looking at Bend or areas on a bay instead of the ocean...thoughts?
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Old 10-18-2018, 09:59 AM
 
Location: WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray87 View Post
This is all very helpful thank you guys! I suppose my next question would be are there smaller inland towns that might be somewhere to live and commute to a job in a popular tourist town? The first town that looked interesting was Cannon Besch but sounds expensive...wasn't sure if you could live outside of the town but commute in to a restaurant/bar that would be busy in summer season. Do places in coastal towns close in the 'off season'? Here a lot of the town closes from December-February. We are not opposed to living away from the beach (just nearby the coast) if there is employment opportunity in these areas just was thinking touristy towns might be the best bet for making decent restaurant money. Someone had mentioned looking at Bend or areas on a bay instead of the ocean...thoughts?
There aren't many towns near the coast but not on the coast. Most of the population of Oregon lives in the Willamette Valley between Eugene in the south and Portland in the North. The coast range of mountains divides the Willamette Valley from the coast. These mountains are fairly rugged and there are very few roads that cross over the mountains from the Willamette Valley to the coast. There are small settlements here and there along these roads that are mostly old logging and mill towns but for the most part it is just forest land until you get all the way to the coast.

Along the actual coast itself you have two types of towns: Fishing/logging towns and beach towns. The older towns all grew up based on fishing, logging, sawmills, and dairy farming in a few places. These towns are located along all the natural bays and harbors that are mostly at the mouths of rivers where fishing boats can find shelter in the bays and the lumber industry had the rivers available to float logs down to the mills and markets. Without a natural harbor there was little reason for a town to emerge on the coast in the pre-tourism era because there was no highway running along the coast until the 1920s. So these are all the old coastal towns with character like Astoria, Newport, Florence, Depot Bay, Bandon, etc were established on natural harbors or bays. And also some of the towns that are located on sheltered bays like Tillamook, Astoria, and Reedsport are situated well inland of the actual coastline and beaches because that is where the sheltered natural harbors are in those locations.

Then you have lots of newer beach towns that are really nothing more than collections of vacation homes along some beach that grew up into a beach town. These towns tend not to have any actual industry other than tourism because they don't have natural harbors to bring in fishing boats or logs or other industries, and didn't exist until highway 101 was built. Prior to the construction of US-101 in the 1920s there was no highway along the coast because there were too many big rivers and mountains to cross. Without a harbor (or in a few cases a railroad from the valley) there was basically no way in or out and no reason for a town to exist. These "newer" beach towns are places like Cannon Beach, Rockaway Beach, Yachats, Seaside, Manzanita, and so on. Some, like Canon Beach and Manzanita are quite upscale. Others like Rockaway Beach are more downscale/blue collar.

There are a more "beach towns" on the northern coast because those areas are much closer to the population centers of Portland and the other Willamette Valley cities that draw weekend tourists. The southern coast is more remote and towns are fewer and farther apart and more isolated. The nearest city, Medford, in southern Oregon is about 2x farther from the coast than the cities in the northern Willamette Valley like Portland and Salem and the coast mountain range is even more rugged down there so the towns on the southern Oregon coast are really a LOT more isolated and get a lot less weekend tourism.

If it were me I'd look at the northern half of the coast from Florence to Astoria which has much easier access to the larger cities across the mountains. If you are thinking of seasonal service industry work then you'll be able to find that pretty much anywhere. The bigger challenge will be housing. Places that are not right on the beach are probably going to be the better bet because you won't be competing as much with the short-term vacation rental market. So it's probably easier to find a rental in say Tillamook, which is not a beach town, than Manzanita, which is. And I would start with Newport and Astoria, which are the only two towns on the central/northern coast that are large enough to have a bit more diversified economies.
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