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Old 04-21-2008, 01:42 PM
 
5 posts, read 10,297 times
Reputation: 11
Smile Thank you, Silverfall.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverfall View Post
Older homes out here often have basements which is not a wise idea with our low water table. I have seen water seep into basements through the cracks in the cement. Older homes also don't have proper venting of the foundations and basements.

My current home is built in 1960 and I have never gotten mold around the hinges. I would get mold in my bathroom window, if I didn't clean it, but I do clean my house.

I don't think I am lucky. I think you need to get a well built house, that has proper ventilation and have homeowners that clean it. I'm not sure that it's fair to say that you have lived in places with a mold problem when you admit that you don't clean your windows...
I really appreciate your help on this. I've learned a lot. Hopefully, when the time comes, I will be able to pick out a well-built house w/ proper ventilation and make sure to get it thoroughly inspected prior to purchase. I will also note that a dehumidifier for the house and fans in the bathroom are must-haves, and the basement is a no no.

By the way, when it comes to mold issues, is hardwood and/or laminated fake wood floor easier to maintain than the carpeted floor?
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Old 04-21-2008, 02:14 PM
 
Location: coos bay oregon
2,096 posts, read 5,748,515 times
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Ive only needed a de-humidifier in that one house. Other than that, we've never had the need for one. Remember too, you want to have SOME moisture in the air! When we had a woodstove, we had to keep a pot of liquid going on top, otherwise, the air got so dry, we'd all end up w/monster headaches and nosebleeds. Of course, thats not everyone, but sure was our experience!
Honestly, even living along the coast, most people I know do NOT have de-humidifiers or mold problems. Just be careful picking your house.
Oh, and as for basements, where i wouldnt got for a traditional basement (theyre too scary for me anyhow! lol) the ones w/the daylight basements can be awesome! My folks had one in their house in Portland, converted into a full downstairs apartment, and they never did have any mold probs. Again though, it was a daylight, NOT traditional basement. Just food for thought.
We had hardwood floors, but they were coated....again, it was in the "bad house" and we did get some spots where mold tried to grow. Like right under the windows where the walls had gone bad from the window seal leaks, that was a happy mold area....and under the piano in the corner by another window w/issues. Not good. No probs in the carpeted area, but it was in a totally different part of the house where we didnt have issues anyhow. So i guess thats not a very good comparison anyhow.
BUT, when you look, dont be shy about pulling back carpet, or getting down there and getting a good wiff! Who cares if you look silly, this is serious check up time!
Best of luck!
Tiffany
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Old 04-22-2008, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Oregon
475 posts, read 702,082 times
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well, having lived in several homes in the portland area and mcminnville: yes there can be a mold/ mildew problem, especially if the house is built on the lower flat elevations that are clay soil. This retains a lot of water it seems, rather than draining quickly after the rains.
I have noticed that in unheated rooms and inside window frame tracks it is especially problematic, having to be cleaned out often. Even with newer vinylized or coated metal windows. A bathroom with NO windows is pretty bad too, even with a fan. It seems that heated rooms fare better.
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Old 04-24-2008, 04:15 PM
 
5 posts, read 10,297 times
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Wink Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2bpurrfect View Post
well, having lived in several homes in the portland area and mcminnville: yes there can be a mold/ mildew problem, especially if the house is built on the lower flat elevations that are clay soil. This retains a lot of water it seems, rather than draining quickly after the rains.
I have noticed that in unheated rooms and inside window frame tracks it is especially problematic, having to be cleaned out often. Even with newer vinylized or coated metal windows. A bathroom with NO windows is pretty bad too, even with a fan. It seems that heated rooms fare better.
Thank you, 2bpurrfect. I should have posted the thread in the Portland forum since I am more leaning towards Portland or its surround areas. Your response, therefore, was really helpful. I have concluded that.. mold could be a bit of problem up there, well at least compared to California, and I will just have to deal with it diligently. We do have many other problems down here, but mold just is not one of the issues you would face everyday. So, it would be kind of a new thing to worry about, and I just wanted some opinion from the locals, how to deal with mold problems, so that I could be ready to face it when the time comes.

Thank you all for such great responses.
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Old 04-25-2008, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
6,470 posts, read 7,019,717 times
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Mold developed as a problem in construction after the building officials required that we seal up our homes to conserve energy. Buildings need to breathe. This isn't a Portland, or even a Pacific Northwest, issue - it is nation wide. In the last couple years the codes have been changed to require ventilation but it is a mixed bag out there.

Watch out for buildings with plastic wrap. There are a couple new products that work like Gortex (moisture goes out, not in) but it is more expensive.
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Old 04-25-2008, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
10,767 posts, read 17,565,884 times
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I have a daylight basement and I don't have a mold issue in my current house. I just think traditional basements here in Oregon are a little dicey.

I am not a geologist, but I think a good chunk of the valley has clay soil. It doesn't percolate well so it tends to expand in the winter holding the water, and then dries up in the summer and contracts. So...we get a lot of settling cracks out here. Some of the new construction cracks are really bad. A home with just a few cracks is a sign of good engineering and construction, in my opinion.

I have hardwood floors in my house, because I think carpet is gross (it holds dust, moisture, etc). I just like knowing that I can get that stuff off my floor.

Nell is correct in that mold problems did increase in homes due to the lack of "breathing" that new construction homes have had. This was a nationwide trend, and I actually remember reading some articles telling people to open their windows to ventilate their houses.

As you are house hunting just look at a lot of homes. If you buy new construction find out about the reputation of the builder at the time they built the house, and from an agent who does not have the builder's contract.

Portland is a GREAT city.
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Old 04-26-2008, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
6,470 posts, read 7,019,717 times
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I grew up in Portland, lived there for 50 years. My spouse is an Architect. My parents homes always had basements, my own family home had a daylight basement. Never had a mold problem, never used a dehumidifier.

However, my Dad was a soils engineer and was anal about drainage. My husband has similar priorities. The outside wall of a basement should have a moisture barrier and footing drains.

Siding underlayment was what most call tar paper.. it breathes. Windows were properly flashed and maintained. Any sign of moisture coming inside the building envelope was immediately addressed.

If your roof leaks then bat insulation will get wet. Fix the leak asap and dispose of the insulation.

Keep vents clean. Dust accumulates. Moist air and dust can grow molds.

And yes, finding sub contractors who know how to properly protect a building from moisture intrusion, and execute same, is a challenge. Husband has seen subs actually move underlayment along when putting on siding to save a buck. The builder of the $1M+ house next door to us installed lap siding backwards because he wanted the smooth side out (which means that the drip edge was backwards). Fake stucco weep-holes clog. Window flashing is improperly installed. Could go on for pages. All these installations can cause mold... in every community where it even rains occasionally.

Last edited by Nell Plotts; 04-26-2008 at 03:44 PM..
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