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Old 02-28-2022, 12:15 PM
 
25,027 posts, read 33,347,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Thanks for this info. Oregon might want to consider increasing its water catchment capacity, like CA started doing during the last drought. They were building something like large holding ponds as public works in the agricultural areas. Elsewhere, they're been developing desal plants. NM has been encouraging residents for years to build cisterns to catch rain water, when there happens to be any.



Do you honestly think Oregon is sitting around doing nothing to prepare for further drought?

If you move to Oregon and immediately start telling them what they should do because California did it, you're not going to make any friends. "We did it this way in California" is a huge pet peeve here.

Last edited by Metlakatla; 02-28-2022 at 01:02 PM..
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Old 02-28-2022, 06:19 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
98,595 posts, read 97,065,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
Do you honestly think Oregon is sitting around doing nothing to prepare for further drought?

If you move to Oregon and immediately start telling them what they should do because California did it, you're not going to make any friends. "We did it this way in California" is a huge pet peeve here.
?? I haven't seen any info on this, on this forum or elsewhere. This isn't about California, it's about how states in the West are coping with drought. Feel free to contribute any info you might have.
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Old 02-28-2022, 08:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
?? I haven't seen any info on this, on this forum or elsewhere. This isn't about California, it's about how states in the West are coping with drought. Feel free to contribute any info you might have.
You can get more information on how various Oregon communities are "coping with drought" by doing an online search. You might find the situation in the Klamath Basin of interest, idk.

As well as plenty of information about how it's not really working out so well for California.

https://www.npr.org/2021/07/22/10194...sting-aquifers

But my comment was simply to let you know that if you arrive in Oregon and immediately start talking about how we should be handling the drought or anything else because that's how California did it, it won't be well-received. That's just how it is here.

Last edited by Metlakatla; 02-28-2022 at 09:11 PM..
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Old 03-02-2022, 12:18 PM
 
427 posts, read 329,971 times
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Raining here in the metro area for the past few days. Just had a decent downpour earlier this morning.

Not sure about water, no issues for us. But it was very dry last summer and I don't think we have had as much rain as we should by early March.
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Old 03-02-2022, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Idaho
820 posts, read 553,625 times
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It's not so much about rain in town, but how much snow is packed up on Mt Hood and the rest of the Cascades, and then how fast it melts off later this spring. Even if there is enough snow on the mountains this season, if it gets extra warm in April - July, and that snow melts off faster than normal, that can impact drought conditions similar to if there was a lower snow pack, but it melted off slower too.
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Old 03-02-2022, 07:40 PM
 
Location: WA Desert, Seattle native
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.

Last edited by pnwguy2; 03-02-2022 at 08:36 PM..
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Old 03-04-2022, 01:57 PM
 
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If you live in the mid or east valley you are dependent on snow run off. If living in the west valley such as Mcminnville or Dallas, your water supply comes from the coastal hills as run off captured in reservoirs.
Whereas the snow pack is dismal and likely that is the new norm, considering the coast verages 75" to 90" a year dpending on location, it is unlikely that any town relying on coastal rain will have water issues in the near future.
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Old 03-04-2022, 02:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlanes View Post
If you live in the mid or east valley you are dependent on snow run off. If living in the west valley such as Mcminnville or Dallas, your water supply comes from the coastal hills as run off captured in reservoirs.
Whereas the snow pack is dismal and likely that is the new norm, considering the coast verages 75" to 90" a year dpending on location, it is unlikely that any town relying on coastal rain will have water issues in the near future.
Except they're already having "water issues."

https://www.opb.org/article/2021/08/...lining-supply/

Quote:
Newport residents and businesses are banned from using irrigation systems, filling outdoor pools, or washing their vehicles. The city says the rules are in place because of declining flows in the Siletz River, which supplies Newport’s drinking water. A press release from the city calls it a “very serious situation.”


Rainfall averages of the past don't reflect the "new normal," either.
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Old 03-05-2022, 10:48 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
30,865 posts, read 42,431,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlanes View Post
........ it is unlikely that any town relying on coastal rain will have water issues in the near future.

Nope.


I had a house in Yachats and we had water rationing every summer.
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Old 03-06-2022, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Pomeroy, WA (Near Lewiston, ID)
294 posts, read 432,212 times
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I lived in Cannon Beach for 2.5 years so I am familiar with Clatsop County.
Astoria: A touristy town with a lot of attractions. The column, the maritime museum, the short trolly, the Goonies museum, and the jetty (technically in Warrenton) are popular with visitors. Cruise ships will occasionally dock here (in fact there is a river cruise that starts in Portland or Astoria and ends near my current location 300 miles away). Astoria is also a functional town as opposed to Seaside in the sense that it feels like it belongs to locals more than Seaside and the seat of county government is there. Need gov't help? DSHS at the blue building in Astoria. Have jury duty? Court is in Astoria. Attending college or job training? Clatsop Community College or Tongue Point Job Corps can help.
Columbia Memorial Hospital has services but I think Seaside's providence is bigger.
Astoria also has a grittier feel. Not dangerous but think fisherman / longshoreman in a port setting type of atmosphere.

Warrenton: As others have mentioned, it is the big box location with Costco, Walmart / Cash n Carry, Fred Meyer. Sunset Beach and Fort Clatsop are popular attractions for recreation and history. They are the most business friendly.

Gearhart is just a small unincorporated community just north of Seaside with lots of little hotels and a golf course.

Seaside: This is probably the most "beachy" beach town. All the tourists from Portland go to Seaside. There are a lot of hotels, the Prom walk has a lot of boardwalk type activities, a small aquarium, a convention center, the end of the Hood to Coast Relay (massive traffic) and I think there's a huge volleyball tourney that is in town as well. I lived in Cannon Beach so I don't like the manicured beach that is Seaside's but many people do.

Cannon Beach: A very artsy town. If you are familiar with California, it reminds me a lot of Carmel. A rich community with mostly summer homes and owned/staffed by locals who depend on seasonal income to get through the winter months. The beach is much more natural and is not level or manicured. Haystack Rock is the main feature.

Arch Cape: A quiet residential community close to a state park and quieter than Cannon Beach or Seaside.

Going back to Astoria, you'd think there'd be more development on the WA side but there are only small communities until you get to Long Beach/ Ilwaco.
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