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Old 06-11-2008, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
1,372 posts, read 1,126,235 times
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Default How much of Oregon is actually forest?

I've thought about this a lot. West of the Cascades, 80 to 90 percent of Oregon is forest, the Willamette Valley and a few other small valleys being the only large areas without forest. East of the Cascades you have a lot of desert, with forests in the mountains. More of eastern Oregon is timbered than you'd think, but some areas are so sparse they're hardly what you'd call a "forest".
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Old 06-11-2008, 10:20 PM
 
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From what I read in the World Alamanac, half of Oregon, or 30 million acres is forested.
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Old 06-12-2008, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Stumptown
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At the rate of development it won't be that way for long. In my lifetime the U.S. is going to develop/urbanize an area equal to the state of Montana.

It's pretty depressing, actually.
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Old 06-14-2008, 12:49 AM
 
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Backdrifter: Puhleeze. Are you for real? Do you truly believe that there's going to be a substantial decrease in forestation in Oregon? Development in Oregon is relatively small. Logging has plummeted.
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Old 06-14-2008, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Stumptown
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Bobmulk, it's little by little. We're talking over many years. I live in the city limits in a town in Southern Oregon and every time (about once a month) I drive outside of the city to see family there is a new subdivision, new houses popping up everywhere. After a while they all do add up. My family's home used to be surrounded by forest and now they can see the road from their living room, plus three other houses.
It's not just huge swaths of clearcutting here. It's all the little development added up encroaching further into the wilderness all over America.
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Old 06-15-2008, 12:21 AM
 
Location: Socialist Republik of Amerika
6,212 posts, read 7,988,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by backdrifter View Post
Bobmulk, it's little by little. We're talking over many years. I live in the city limits in a town in Southern Oregon and every time (about once a month) I drive outside of the city to see family there is a new subdivision, new houses popping up everywhere. After a while they all do add up. My family's home used to be surrounded by forest and now they can see the road from their living room, plus three other houses.
It's not just huge swaths of clearcutting here. It's all the little development added up encroaching further into the wilderness all over America.
Homes are mostly built in the low lands, and in the foothills, the forested areas are more than 70% in Josephine county, less in Jackson county, due to the farmlands and low lands.
Here's a tidbit, there are more trees in Oregon now, than when it became a state.

freedom
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Old 06-15-2008, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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There might be more trees, but is there more diversity? A lot of the "new forests" in Oregon are one-tree stands. Hardly a "forest".
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Old 06-15-2008, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Socialist Republik of Amerika
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MimzyMusic View Post
There might be more trees, but is there more diversity? A lot of the "new forests" in Oregon are one-tree stands. Hardly a "forest".
When you add in city, parks, commercial, and residential landscapes, there is way more diversity than before Oregon was a state.

freedom
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Old 06-16-2008, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Stumptown
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freedom View Post
When you add in city, parks, commercial, and residential landscapes, there is way more diversity than before Oregon was a state.

freedom
The thing is that kind of "diversity" is not natural diversity. For example, there are literally hundreds of species of plants and trees and wildflowers that are endemic to, for example, the forests of the Siskiyous in Josephine and Curry counties. THAT is true diversity and a lot of that has probably been lost already in many regions of the U.S. Thankfully this region isn't terribly threatened at the moment, notwithstanding all the growth in the area.

But alas, where else are we going to put all of our McMansions, big box stores, and strip malls?
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Old 06-16-2008, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Socialist Republik of Amerika
6,212 posts, read 7,988,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by backdrifter View Post
The thing is that kind of "diversity" is not natural diversity. For example, there are literally hundreds of species of plants and trees and wildflowers that are endemic to, for example, the forests of the Siskiyous in Josephine and Curry counties. THAT is true diversity and a lot of that has probably been lost already in many regions of the U.S. Thankfully this region isn't terribly threatened at the moment, notwithstanding all the growth in the area.

But alas, where else are we going to put all of our McMansions, big box stores, and strip malls?
Ofcourse its natural, man plants it and we are natural inhabitants of this planet. If man did not cultivate, we would not be here. Then what? Diversity for the sake of ???? Man is part of the process of an evolving earth, if it needs to change in a few areas, that is all part of the natural selection of this planet. As we are the fittest.
Mcmansions, help feed PEOPLE, people are primary beings, and have the right to live and learn on this beautiful orb. We have learned from our mistakes and our accomplishments.
Strip malls create convenience so we can have more time to enjoy the Earth and all of its splendor.

Big box stores reduce our carbon footprint, all in one shopping.

In Oregon the gov't owns nearly 70% of the land, its a miracle that man can even survive in that non diversive monopoly.

freedom
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