U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Thanksgiving Day!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-07-2009, 02:24 PM
 
Location: In God's Hands
81 posts, read 130,042 times
Reputation: 86

Advertisements

We're heading up to Lakeview from the Sierra Nevada foothills in CA, as my husband has a job interview at the prison there. I'm finding some info online that the prison was potentially to close, but as of July Oregon has a budget that does not include prison closures. Does anyone have anything to add to this? We'd hate to move there and then get laid off.

Also, does anyone have an opinion on how the locals feel about the prison? I have found mixed information about how the community feels about it now that it's there, but the basic consensus I can find is that the people of Lakeview did not want it, at least initially. Does this sentiment still hold? Are we going to be shunned by the community if my husband gets the job, and we are "transplants" working at a place that's hated? The town appeals to us because it fits our personalities and lifestyles, and our deisre to raise our kids in a smaller, close-knit community. But I am wondering if we will be welcomed or not. If we move there, we want to fit in and be a part of the town and enjoy it the way it is. The visit will provide info, but I am interested in anyone's opinion on this thread.

Thank you.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-07-2009, 02:33 PM
Status: "Sweater and boot weather" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley
4,221 posts, read 8,207,967 times
Reputation: 3425
If you are moving from Susanville (or similar) to Lakeview, you'll find a similar community in Lakeview (albeit with far fewer trees). The issue of transplants vs locals has more to do with culture than anything else, and if you are comfortable in a working-class small town agricultural community, you'll blend fast.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2009, 02:29 PM
 
Location: the Beaver State
6,477 posts, read 6,215,644 times
Reputation: 3295
Lakeview is not a very closed community like some thing. It's the (only) road to get to several locations so the town is well used to visitors. But it is a small rural town, with all the mentality that implies, although the last lynching happened in the late 1800s- Lynching of W.S. Thompson | Hamell.net . The town's economy is 90% agricultural based.

That being said, Lakeview's citizens have always had a very pragmatic view. Sure, the prison wasn't really wanted, nor was the uranium mine. But once they were in place they're more or less accepted. Being able to make ends meet and bring in next years crops is the foremost thought on just about every bodies mind.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2009, 06:23 PM
 
Location: In God's Hands
81 posts, read 130,042 times
Reputation: 86
Thank you both for your input. It is helpful.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2009, 10:08 AM
 
Location: where the moss is taking over the villages
2,161 posts, read 3,193,487 times
Reputation: 1166
Hi SWM- I hope your move goes well & that your husband's new job will be great!

I remember reading about this when I was researching cancer & pollution issues in Oregon... I found this information - if you google this you'll find more info:

Lakeview, Oregon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lakeview has several schools, a hospital, a sawmill, a perlite mine and agriculture. Economic development plans including a prison that opened in 2005 have been controversial.[16] Lakeview is home to two uranium mines, White King and Lucky Lass, that operated from 1955 to the mid-1960s. In 1995 the mines were declared Superfund sites.[17]
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2009, 07:34 PM
 
Location: the Beaver State
6,477 posts, read 6,215,644 times
Reputation: 3295
The mines were opened again in the late 90's to early part of the century, as my grandfather got a secondary job driving trucks for them. I do not know if they're still in operation though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2009, 11:55 AM
 
Location: where the moss is taking over the villages
2,161 posts, read 3,193,487 times
Reputation: 1166
Default the mines

were closed: superfund sites now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2009, 06:04 PM
 
Location: where the moss is taking over the villages
2,161 posts, read 3,193,487 times
Reputation: 1166
maybe we aren't talking about the same mines. here's a little info I've found: NPL Site Narrative for Fremont Nat. Forest Uranium Mines (USDA) | National Priorities List (NPL) | US EPA

the pollution issues are saddening. the way the epa decides to handle this is a bit unsettling. i think they just want to "cover" the dirt & hope the contamination won't spread...

the way I came across this was by researching cancer rates/clusters & saw Lake county's rate was higher than Klamath. since I bought a bit of land in Beatty, I was, of course, wondering if it was safer in K. County than where I am, currently, in Lane. Lake county seemed to have higher statistics. hence my wondering "why"...

radon is high in northern Oregon. doesn't seem high in Klamath but there in the article on the above link, it says that radon is one of the constituents of the pollution coming from the uranium mining. hopefully it's all pretty much under control. but you know how that goes. it isn't a priority until circumstances reach a hysterical peak.

on a brighter point, i did read in a wiki article that the prison installation has had a better reception from the citizens than expected! and we all love the opportunity to welcome new jobs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2009, 10:06 AM
Status: "Sweater and boot weather" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley
4,221 posts, read 8,207,967 times
Reputation: 3425
Radon is a decay product of uranium. Anywhere uranium is or was found, radon will be found.

If you search the web, you'll find a lot of articles arguing over radon levels and hazards, but, in general, radon is a mitigatable hazard.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2009, 01:14 PM
 
Location: where the moss is taking over the villages
2,161 posts, read 3,193,487 times
Reputation: 1166
if i were simplewife&mom, i'd want to know about this kind of thing so I could make an informed decision:

Government site:

Nuclear Decommissioning - Lakeview Mill. - nuclear decommissioning

There was a remediation project to help with the radon issue, etc...

"Relocation of the mill tailings and other site materials was necessitated by the potential for future geothermal and seismic activity in the vicinity of the Lakeview mill site."

"The Lakeview Disposal Cell (also known as the Collins Ranch Disposal site) was constructed on a 40-acre parcel of land acquired by the State of Oregon in 1986 under a civil action suit. The disposal cell is located about seven miles northwest of the city of Lakeview, Oregon"....

"At the Lakeview Disposal Cells site, the DOE conducts annual inspections along with maintenance as required. Annual monitoring of groundwater around the site is done to demonstrate the integrity of the cell structure and this will be continued to 2003, after which the monitoring will be performed at intervals of once every five-years."

....What about the water quality in Lakeview?....


"Some 59 million cubic yards of groundwater in the vicinity of the mill site are contaminated with materials generated from uranium ore processing, including molybdenum, radium, and ARSENIC. The contaminated PLUME of groundwater covers about 116 ACRES and affects the shallow aquifer in the stream and lake-bed strata beneath the former mill site. Ground water outside the contaminant PLUME is used for domestic, industrial, and agricultural purposes. Regionally, the ground water is of generally poor quality and has a naturally high mineral content resulting from active hydrothermal processes in the area. Because the groundwater exceeds applicable potable water standards, irrespective of the contamination caused by mill site pollutants, the EPA approved the application of supplemental standards (Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 192.22). Thus, no groundwater remediation will be required for the mill site. Surface water adjacent to the mill site has not been degraded by site contaminants. The DOE’s activities at the former mill site include groundwater monitoring and assuring effectiveness of institutional controls regarding groundwater uses. In August 2000, a groundwater protection strategy was proposed to assure human health and protect the environment. Under cooperative agreement between the DOE and the State of Oregon, the strategy focuses on institutional controls for the mill site’s contaminated groundwater and implementation of restrictions on groundwater uses. It also will provide for assistance in upgrading the City of Lakeview’s domestic water system and long-term monitoring of groundwater in the area. Biennial monitoring of groundwater will continue until 2013 and afterwards once every five years in perpetuity. "

concerned citizen site:

Decommissioning Projects, USA - UMTRA Title I.

1999 "DOE's proposed compliance strategy for addressing the contamination in the groundwater associated with past milling activities at the Lakeview Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site is "no further action". This proposal is based on the widespread, naturally occurring arsenic content in the water. According to DOE, this contamination was not a result of the milling activities that took place at the Lakeview former processing site."

" Riprap rock cover on reclaimed uranium mill tailings deposit does not meet longterm durability requirement
A riprap layer is often placed atop reclaimed mine tailings repositories to provide long-term erosion protection. Rock quality tests performed on samples taken from the cover of the reclaimed UMTRA uranium mill tailings impoundment near Lakeview, Oregon, indicated that the rock was suitable for erosion protection; the durability evaluation, however, suggested that the rock may disintegrate in 130 to 272 years. This is less than the applicable 200 - 1000 year longterm criteria."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:15 PM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top