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Old 02-09-2011, 08:11 AM
 
17,529 posts, read 15,781,312 times
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Its generally not a good idea to stop and try to offer assistance to somebody stranded along the side of the road. Besides safety concerns, you run a far greater risk of being hit by another car. The absolute worst thing you can do is try to change a flat tire. Especially nowadays with so many cell phone users and distracted drivers. And you slip and scratch the car or damage something, get hurt and you're responsible. I guess it would depend on the circumstances. An elderly couple or a woman with small children, yeah. But these days most people have cell phones so you could assume they've already called for assistance. If I was really worried about their safety I'd contact police or wait nearby until help arrived.
I had a person come out of a house and offer me a half gallon of gas when they saw me break down. That's something I'd at least do. I once tried to help a woman put windshield wiper blades on her car after she said she was warned by the police not to drive without working wiper blades in the remnants of a hurricane at night. After a minute I couldn't figure out why such a beat up old car would have retractable wipers. Then I saw the wiper arms had been removed so the wiper blades were useless. I got wet for nothing and cursed the cop for not fining her and making her park the car and stop driving.
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Old 02-09-2011, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
33,459 posts, read 31,489,657 times
Reputation: 48299
I don't even know how to open the hood of my car so I'd more likely be the person needing help, not giving it. I would make a phone call for them but who drives without a cell phone these days?
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Old 02-09-2011, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Georgia, on the Florida line, right above Tallahassee
10,473 posts, read 13,138,913 times
Reputation: 6299
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I don't even know how to open the hood of my car so I'd more likely be the person needing help, not giving it. I would make a phone call for them but who drives without a cell phone these days?

<---- I've never owned a personal cell phone. Work phone, yeah. Work pager, yeah. Personal cell phone, no. I consider it to be an equivalent of an electronic ankle bracelet. My wife and son have one....and my son can't live without it. In fact, it's great for my wife to keep tabs on him.

I don't hate them. I just don't see the need for that partcular tool in my life. They are ubiquitous in many other cultures, though.

How to Make Actual Personal Connections: Try Ditching the Cell Phone : Westwood Charter Real Estate Voice

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanes..._phone_culture

Sony, working with NTT DoCoMo, has been spearheading the mobile phone wallet technology, commonly known as 'FeliCa'. This technology makes use of an RFID chip inside the handset that can communicate with reading devices when the phone is placed near them. Though the technology is relatively new, there are many locations such as convenience stores which allow users to pay for goods using their phones; some vending machines even accept phone payments. Users must 'charge up' their accounts with credits before they can pay using their phones. The growing popularity of the system is compelling other manufacturers to make compatible phones

First time I saw this was really a WTF? kind of moment. Someone at the register, swiping their phone and walking out with stuff.
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Old 02-09-2011, 08:28 AM
 
Location: North Cackelacky....in the hills.
19,556 posts, read 18,351,646 times
Reputation: 2495
Have done it before,would do it again.

Color/ethnicity/sex matters little,situation does.

I used to work out in the boonies,was driving home and saw a car on the side of the road broken down,pulled over and it was a young black woman,gave her a ride back to the restaurant I worked at and she called for help.
Interestingly enough,she was a cop from the nearby town.

I have stopped on the interstate to help people,once when someone had spun out and run into the guard rail,another time when I spotted taillights down in the ditch.

Wife and I also stopped to help when I spotted taillights where they should not have been-off the road and in the woods.That was a young,obviously drunk girl who had managed to get her SUV across the ditch and into the woods,barely missing a huge pine tree.

But it all depends upon the situation and how you feel about it.
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Old 02-09-2011, 08:38 AM
 
6,395 posts, read 6,314,396 times
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I've been helped, and have stopped to help.

I ran out of gas once (the only time) on a steep hill in my cheap, no fuel-injection car. Of course, this was the one day I'd decided to wear shoes completely unsuitable for walking, so I sat for a few minutes, thinking about the walk to the gas station. A guy in a Jeep saw me, u-turned, and came back to help. He went and got a gallon of gas, put it in the car, and wouldn't let me give him money for the gas.

On the same busy road (North Oracle Road in Tucson), I was behind a lady in a Mazda RX-7 who didn't go when the light turned green. Then I saw her hazards come on, but they faded out within a few seconds. So I put my hazards on and stayed behind her while she ran across the road to call for help. While we were waiting for her tow to arrive, a policeman came by and took over for me, and I was on my way home.

I've also gotten out of my car or rolled down the window to tell people when they have no taillights. They have all appreciated the info.

The situation determines whether I'll approach people. If I don't think I should stop, or can't for other reasons, I will call 911 and report the problem.
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Old 02-09-2011, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Texas
30,499 posts, read 16,552,589 times
Reputation: 17533
Thumbs up If you saw someone needing help on the side of the road, would you help them?

I have in the past and no doubt will in the future.
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Old 02-09-2011, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Redondo Beach, CA
7,255 posts, read 6,748,879 times
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Yes, if I saw them in time to have the opportunity to pull over. On the freeway, you can be long past someone by the time you realize they might need assistance. But if something happens right in front of me and it's safe to move over, of course. I've done so several times in my life. And have been fortunate enough that a few people have pulled over and helped me, as well (I've had not one, but TWO tire blow-outs on the freeway!).

I'm also trained by 2 different cities' fire departments, and certified by 3, to respond in the event of an emergency until the professionals arrive. It's meant primarily for assistance during "disasters", but can be applied to many other types of emergencies, as well. I highly recommend checking into the program in your community -- they're literally all over the country.

Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT)
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Old 02-09-2011, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,810 posts, read 13,264,249 times
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Probably not in a big city but I did a couple of times when I lived in So. Cal. Here in rural NE I probably wouldn't hesitate to stop, depending on a few clues that would indicate it would likely be safe for me to do so.
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Old 04-25-2012, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Georgia, on the Florida line, right above Tallahassee
10,473 posts, read 13,138,913 times
Reputation: 6299
Quote:
Originally Posted by mb1547 View Post
I live in rural America. I'll always stop, even if it's just to roll the window down a crack to ask if they need me to call someone for them, OR, if they' look a little scary, I'll call the Sheriff's office and tell them they have a distressed motorist with the location. If it's another woman, or if they have kids, I'll get out of the car. When I was in college, I took my older car on a trip to visit friends, and wound up stranded on the side of the road on a really cold night in the middle of nowhere, a long way from a truck stop. A truck driver stopped to help me--I was terrified I was going to be murdered and thrown in a ditch, but it was pre-cell phone days, so I went along vs. freeze to death. The first thing he did was show me the pictures of his daughters, and told me all he could think of was what if "his Amy," his own teenage daughter, was in the same situation. We still exchange Christmas cards to this day.
Great story!
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Old 04-26-2012, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,810 posts, read 13,264,249 times
Reputation: 32913
Depends. I rarely did so when I lived in California but have done so a couple of times since moving to the boonies. I don't have a cell phone and can't change a tire but if I saw a woman with kids, I'd stop and offer them a lift somewhere.
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