U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Other Topics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Old 05-29-2012, 08:35 AM
 
13,419 posts, read 7,946,173 times
Reputation: 5159

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by sun queen View Post
No way English Dave u can't be that old LOL just kidding... when I was a kid we didn't have central anything except the doors and for heating we had gas heaters. And for cooling swamp coolers. My kids don't even know what a swamp cooler is... I am so old I remember, but I am still sorta a young chick
if you live somewhere with very low humidity, you don't even have to be that old to remember swamp coolers. just a couple years ago, my sister had a central air swamp cooler installed in the house we both grew up in.

it's amazing how well those things worth at 5% relative humidity
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-29-2012, 01:12 PM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
11,979 posts, read 10,591,701 times
Reputation: 34451
HEY,WASN'T THIS US?

A little house with three bedrooms,
one bathroom and one car on the street.
A mower that you had to push
to make the grass look neat.


In the kitchen on the wall
we only had one phone,
And no need for recording things,
someone was always home.


We only had a living room
where we would congregate,
unless it was at mealtime
in the kitchen where we ate.


We had no need for family rooms
or extra rooms to dine.
When meeting as a family
those two rooms would work out fine.


We only had one TV set
and channels maybe two,
But always there was one of them
with something worth the view.

For snacks we had potato chips
that tasted like a chip.
And if you wanted flavor
there was Lipton's onion dip.


Store-bought snacks were rare because
my mother liked to cook
and nothing can compare to snacks
in Betty Crocker's book.


Weekends were for family trips
or staying home to play.
We all did things together --
even go to church to pray.


When we did our weekend trips
depending on the weather,
no one stayed at home because
we liked to be together.


Sometimes we would separate
to do things on our own,
but we knew where the others were
without our own cell phone.

Then there were the movies
with your favorite movie star,
and nothing can compare
to watching movies in your car.


Then there were the picnics
at the peak of summer season,
pack a lunch and find some trees
and never need a reason.


Get a baseball game together
with all the friends you know,
have real action playing ball --
and no game video.


Remember when the doctor
used to be the family friend,
and didn't need insurance
or a lawyer to defend?


The way that he took care of you
or what he had to do,
because he took an oath and strived
to do the best for you.

Remember going to the store
and shopping casually,
and when you went to pay for it
you used your own money?


Nothing that you had to swipe
or punch in some amount,
and remember when the cashier person
had to really count?


The milkman used to go
from door to door,
And it was just a few cents more
than going to the store.


There was a time when mailed letters
came right to your door,
without a lot of junk mail ads
sent out by every store.

The mailman knew each house by name
and knew where it was sent;
there were not loads of mail addressed
to "present occupant."


There was a time when just one glance
was all that it would take,
and you would know the kind of car,
the model and the make.


They didn't look like turtles
trying to squeeze out every mile;
they were streamlined, white walls, fins
and really had some style.



One time the music that you played
whenever you would jive,
was from a vinyl, big-holed record
called a forty-five.


The record player had a post
to keep them all in line
and then the records would drop down
and play one at a time.


Oh sure, we had our problems then,
just like we do today
and always we were striving,
trying for a better way.

Oh, the simple life we lived
still seems like so much fun,
how can you explain a game,
just kick the can and run?


And why would boys put baseball cards
between bicycle spokes
and for a nickel, red machines
had little bottled Cokes?



This life seemed so much easier
and slower in some ways.
I love the new technology
but I sure do miss those days.

So time moves on and so do we
and nothing stays the same,
but I sure love to reminisce
and walk down memory lane.
With all today's technology
we grant that it's a plus!
But it's fun to look way back and say,
Hey look, guys, THAT WAS US!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-30-2012, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,812 posts, read 7,990,208 times
Reputation: 32719
Everyone used fountain pens. Ball point pens hadn't been invented yet. There weren't any felt tip markers, either.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-30-2012, 10:10 AM
 
788 posts, read 1,231,605 times
Reputation: 910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cunucu Beach View Post
Everyone used fountain pens. Ball point pens hadn't been invented yet. There weren't any felt tip markers, either.
My father's boss manufactured and sold the first ball points in the U.S. We had several of the pens which celebrated Reynolds' record-breaking flight around the world.

My father was playing softball in the street during the 1930s when jobs were scarce. A man came up to him and asked if he knew how to drive a car. My dad lied, and said that he knew how to drive. The man gave him directions to an office where my dad picked up a car and delivered a set of golf clubs to Milton Reynolds on a course in Chicago. He was then hired to work in the Reynolds Printasign factory, and continued working for the Reynolds family until his death many years later.

Milton Reynolds - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-30-2012, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,812 posts, read 7,990,208 times
Reputation: 32719
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustPassinThru View Post
My father's boss manufactured and sold the first ball points in the U.S. We had several of the pens which celebrated Reynolds' record-breaking flight around the world.

My father was playing softball in the street during the 1930s when jobs were scarce. A man came up to him and asked if he knew how to drive a car. My dad lied, and said that he knew how to drive. The man gave him directions to an office where my dad picked up a car and delivered a set of golf clubs to Milton Reynolds on a course in Chicago. He was then hired to work in the Reynolds Printasign factory, and continued working for the Reynolds family until his death many years later.

Milton Reynolds - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Would be nice if getting a life long job were that easy today.

I remember steering wheel knobs. They were once pretty common. We called them "necker's knobs". "Necking" meant kissing and cuddling "above the neck". A "necker's knob" let the driver put his arm around the girl seated next to him and drive with one hand.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-30-2012, 01:00 PM
 
788 posts, read 1,231,605 times
Reputation: 910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cunucu Beach View Post
Would be nice if getting a life long job were that easy today.

I remember steering wheel knobs. They were once pretty common. We called them "necker's knobs". "Necking" meant kissing and cuddling "above the neck". A "necker's knob" let the driver put his arm around the girl seated next to him and drive with one hand.
We called them Brodie knobs. I put one on my Dad's '56 Chevy and he had a fit.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2012, 03:54 PM
 
25,085 posts, read 8,725,388 times
Reputation: 41596
Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
if you live somewhere with very low humidity, you don't even have to be that old to remember swamp coolers. just a couple years ago, my sister had a central air swamp cooler installed in the house we both grew up in.

it's amazing how well those things worth at 5% relative humidity
our coolers blew cold u just had to make sure there was water on the cooler. I remember that was part of the deal Well I am not all that old, but my kids say I am
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2012, 03:59 PM
 
935 posts, read 831,495 times
Reputation: 2176
I'm so old I remember.......what the hell??? now what was that I wanted to say???
I can't remember.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2012, 01:33 AM
 
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow in "OZ "
12,403 posts, read 11,799,704 times
Reputation: 13760
I am so old...........My ears are still ringing from the big bang............
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2012, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,812 posts, read 7,990,208 times
Reputation: 32719
I'm so old we had Neanderthals for neighbors.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Other Topics
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top