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Old 01-26-2009, 05:48 PM
 
12,790 posts, read 8,289,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AksarbeN View Post
Dentists seem to be more mouthy about their work then other workers!
Nah, they puy me to sleep usually!
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Old 01-26-2009, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Arizona, The American Southwest
43,161 posts, read 20,129,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Livewire View Post
If you were to use that phrase ('over and under') at my work, you might get replies that would shock you, lol.
......
LOL.. and why is it if I said something like that, I would get a "Go to your room" response faster than you can say "over and under"? Okay, we'll let you get away with it this time.

I'm sure you meant over-priced and under-priced, right?
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Old 01-26-2009, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Arizona, The American Southwest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AksarbeN View Post
Of all the possible employment careers that you know of, what is the one most overpaid and the one most underpaid.

I think CEO jobs of any company or corporation is grossly overpaid. The least overpaid are the school teachers at any grade level.

And how do you determine how much to pay a person who is working for your company? What would be some of the factors you’d use?
Just like everything else, there are good CEOs and bad CEOs, and the ones that bother me the most are those bad CEOs that are overpaid.

I'm not defending CEOs, but you have to remember also Aksarben, that CEOs do have a lot of responsibilities, and in companies that have a management structure that require CEOs to report to certain other inviduals in upper management, if the CEOs can't do their job to fullfill those responsibilies, then they'll be replaced.

As for the most overpaid and underpaid, well.. again CEOs are paid according to their responsibilities, yeah I tend to agree sometimes they do abuse the power they have, and they are overpaid. When you hear about a CEO of a large bank or a financial institution, who is overpaid and driving the company into the ground, and asking for bail-out money from the government, then that CEO should be replaced. If the underpaid complain about how little they're making, the response of their managers is usually, "That's all we can pay you, and if you don't like it, then go work somewhere else". Or "If you want to make more money, then get an education". Or the worst one, nobody wants to hear, "We're sending your job to China because labor rates are much cheaper over there".
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Old 01-27-2009, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Northeastern WI
20,577 posts, read 16,874,987 times
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...And then there are those who DO have the training, the education, who have earned their degrees, and STILL cant find a good job.
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Old 01-27-2009, 01:29 PM
 
12,790 posts, read 8,289,940 times
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Well, I just want to win the lottery-is that so much to ask?
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Old 01-27-2009, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Orlando, Florida
43,861 posts, read 27,868,546 times
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I think entertainers make a ridiculous amount of money. They are living their dream job with an opportunity of a lifetime and they still want to make millions yearly. I mean, I would be willing to keep my same salary, but only act in a sitcom for 13 weeks out of the year than to do my job. Why are they making so much for working so little?
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:54 PM
 
Location: In my playhouse.
1,047 posts, read 1,861,895 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnum Mike View Post
LOL.. and why is it if I said something like that, I would get a "Go to your room" response faster than you can say "over and under"? Okay, we'll let you get away with it this time.

I'm sure you meant over-priced and under-priced, right?
Mike, go to your room for questioning a woman.
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Old 01-27-2009, 09:32 PM
 
5,685 posts, read 5,657,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AksarbeN View Post
Of all the possible employment careers that you know of, what is the one most overpaid and the one most underpaid.

I think CEO jobs of any company or corporation is grossly overpaid. The least overpaid are the school teachers at any grade level.

And how do you determine how much to pay a person who is working for your company? What would be some of the factors you’d use?
The most overpaid would certainly include the vast majority of politicians and a great many CEO's. I would also add sports stars to the list, but then I'm a curmudgeon.

For underpaid, I'd certainly agree with those who nominate teachers (I'm married to someone who taught high school science for a decade, and who left the profession because he wanted to be able to send his own kids to college). And I would also include the small farmers who devote their lives to growing and/or raising high quality food for the rest of the world, and who often barely break even after paying their expenses (not to be confused with the wealthy owners of the factory mega-farms).

As to your other question, how to determine how much to pay an employee, the company I work for has a pretty good handle on that. Every position and job in the company - and there are well over a hundred - is categorized into a pay grade, based on a complex matrix of factors including but not limited to the difficulty of the work, level of education required, amount of self-direction necessary, potential benefit to the company (in sales revenue, collections, margin achieved, etc), number and value of assets managed, number of direct reports, and so on. Within each pay grade there are three different levels, reflecting the range from a total rookie in the position to someone with decades of experience.

And when you think about it, if one applied that type of matrix to every job in the country, with particular emphasis on measuring the potential benefit that can accrue from the work performed, teachers would indeed rank very high. The potential benefit of a good teacher (and the potential cost of a poor one) is literally incalculable.
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Old 01-28-2009, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Arizona, The American Southwest
43,161 posts, read 20,129,199 times
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MidwesternBookWorm - There are a lot of good teachers out there, but it's the schools and the rules and regulations they have to deal with, that prevents them from doing what they're supposed to do. They are underpaid indeed.

I wish politicians could be fired when they can't do their job, just like bad employees. Instead, we have to wait until their term is over and hope they're not re-elected, voluntarily resign, or get impeached, which is a lenghty process.
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Old 01-28-2009, 07:36 AM
 
5,685 posts, read 5,657,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnum Mike View Post
MidwesternBookWorm - There are a lot of good teachers out there, but it's the schools and the rules and regulations they have to deal with, that prevents them from doing what they're supposed to do. They are underpaid indeed.
You are absolutely right on target with that, Mike. And my spouse dealt with a huge amount of it during his decade of teaching. He loved - LOVED - the experience of working with young people, leading them to explore science and their own abilities, and getting them hooked on the experience of learning. But the combination of the low pay and the perpetual interference and regulations burned him out.

It's been nearly two decades since he left the teaching field, we've moved half a continent away from the school where he taught, and we STILL hear from some of his students from time to time. Some made life and career choices as a result of things they learned from him. And I know there are thousands and thousands of other former teachers who had similar impacts on their students, and hence on all of us. Would that we could pay them in accord with the true value of their work.
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