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Old 08-02-2011, 05:11 PM
 
1,269 posts, read 2,088,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Feelingalone81 View Post
WTF would his children use Chinese in Ottawa? Chinatown? I think you are being absolutely ridiculous with your suggestions! His children would use french if not on a daily but a weekly basis in Ottawa!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick99 View Post
I clearly said 'globally relevant' languages, ie. on the possibility that the kid won't stay here when grown and be forced to use a language that is virtually irrelevant on the global scale and merely forcibly sustained in this area as a way to appease separatists.

On another note, if they want this pseudo-bilingualism to be taken seriously, they should test francophones in their own language as well as English. I have seen and read mockeries of the French language by francophones who because they identify as french, only had to be tested in English, in which they are more proficient than in their mother tongue (though still nothing to write home about).

This would be more fair, and end the advantage that self-identified Francophones have for jobs over Anglos.

We seem to have a divergent opinion on the value of the French language. And no, Acajack, northeastern Americans do not need to learn French. Rather, the francos here need to swallow their pride and serve the hated Yanks in the visitors' language in exchange for their tourist dollars (fair trade, I think).
Nick99, I'm afraid that I'm with Feelingalone81 on this one. WTF (testing.. hope cornerguy1 is too sleepy to read this).

Here in Metro Vancouver, they are starting Mandarin-immersion schools, now that China is surpassing US as BC's major lumber importer. When Japan was our major trade partner, we did not adopt their language in our schools. If any parents want their kids to learn foreign languages, do it at their own time and expense. We do not need to navigate through a metropolis with isolated ghettos. Let's stick to our official national languages, English and French.
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Old 08-02-2011, 06:11 PM
 
1,018 posts, read 968,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dougie86 View Post
Nick99, I'm afraid that I'm with Feelingalone81 on this one. WTF (testing.. hope cornerguy1 is too sleepy to read this).

Here in Metro Vancouver, they are starting Mandarin-immersion schools, now that China is surpassing US as BC's major lumber importer. When Japan was our major trade partner, we did not adopt their language in our schools. If any parents want their kids to learn foreign languages, do it at their own time and expense. We do not need to navigate through a metropolis with isolated ghettos. Let's stick to our official national languages, English and French.
This is very misguided, I'm afraid. Mandarin Chinese is a significantly more important language in the Lower Mainland and it's likely to be so for quite some time. Simply put, the French language is not widely used in Canada outside of Quebec, pockets of Eastern and Northern Ontario, and in Northern and Eastern New Brunswick. It's almost certain to be that way forever.

Beyond federal and limited provincial initiatives to promote the use of both the English and French languages within and without these parts of the country, the French language is neither used by nor terribly important to people living in other parts of Canada. Budgets and educational manpower/programming allowing, people in those parts of the country should have the option to have their kids learn at least one of the Spanish, German, Mandarin Chinese, or Japanese languages in addition to federally funded French programs from the first day of school until the day that they graduate. We might also want to consider offering similar language programming in Korean, Russian, Portuguese, and Cantonese. Maybe even Urdu and Hindi. These programs would have to be open to all children subject to their ability to keep up with the work, of course.
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Old 08-03-2011, 08:24 AM
 
52 posts, read 89,592 times
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I have been living in Ottawa for the last 9 years and I love it here. Summers are simply beautiful, winters not so much but not that bad either. If you are into winter sports like skiing, snowboarding there are some nice resorts around.

For apartment rentals, one and two bedroom are most common. 1 bedrooms range somewhere around $800 - $1000 in a decent community. You can check out local apartment rental guides, Craigslist Ottawa and Apartment Rentals Ottawa are some good resources.

Besides that, you can also checkout the rental guides mostly available outside the grocery stores. Try to get some good referrals to make sure you are moving into a good community.

You won't regret moving to Ottawa, it's a beautiful place!
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Old 08-03-2011, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
10,166 posts, read 11,137,265 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick99 View Post
I clearly said 'globally relevant' languages, ie. on the possibility that the kid won't stay here when grown and be forced to use a language that is virtually irrelevant on the global scale and merely forcibly sustained in this area as a way to appease separatists.
Hmmm... nobody is forced to use any language in Ottawa (except maybe English!), but let's be honest about why there is a decent level of bilingualism in the Ottawa region.

It is not artificial and it is not to appease separatists. The fact is that French has a decent presence because 35% of the metropolitan area's population is French-speaking. There is a significant area of the metropolitan area (Gatineau and environs) that functions almost totally in French (police, fire, schools, local government, businesses, courts, utilities, civil society, etc.) The metro area actually has several census subdivisions where the majority of the population speaks only French.

Going beyond the local level, Ottawa is also the capital and administrative centre of an officially bilingual country and as such the government agencies based there must be able to deal in French with the Quebec provincial government, various French-language organizations, and thousands of municipalities like Rimouski, Val-d'Or, Ste-Whatever, Caraquet, etc., just as deals with stakeholders in other parts of the country in English.

All of this is patently obvious, and it's actually somewhat depressing to have to set the record straight on it here.
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Old 08-03-2011, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
10,166 posts, read 11,137,265 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick99 View Post
We seem to have a divergent opinion on the value of the French language. And no, Acajack, northeastern Americans do not need to learn French.
I never suggested that all northeastern Americans should learn French. What I mean is that every place in the world has a second language in their school system. In a place like Burlington, Vermont, it might be more logical for that language to be French rather than Spanish.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick99 View Post
Rather, the francos here need to swallow their pride and serve the hated Yanks in the visitors' language in exchange for their tourist dollars (fair trade, I think).
And by and large, that's what francophones do. On the other hand, it's odd that the same fair trade does not lead to French service in most shops in Ottawa, where I am pretty sure there are more French-speaking clients than there are American tourists who show up in Ste-Mâchemâlo-de-Whatever, PQ, looking for someone to speak to them in English.
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Old 08-03-2011, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
10,166 posts, read 11,137,265 times
Reputation: 3925
Quote:
Originally Posted by maclock View Post
This is very misguided, I'm afraid. Mandarin Chinese is a significantly more important language in the Lower Mainland and it's likely to be so for quite some time. Simply put, the French language is not widely used in Canada outside of Quebec, pockets of Eastern and Northern Ontario, and in Northern and Eastern New Brunswick. It's almost certain to be that way forever.

Beyond federal and limited provincial initiatives to promote the use of both the English and French languages within and without these parts of the country, the French language is neither used by nor terribly important to people living in other parts of Canada. Budgets and educational manpower/programming allowing, people in those parts of the country should have the option to have their kids learn at least one of the Spanish, German, Mandarin Chinese, or Japanese languages in addition to federally funded French programs from the first day of school until the day that they graduate. We might also want to consider offering similar language programming in Korean, Russian, Portuguese, and Cantonese. Maybe even Urdu and Hindi. These programs would have to be open to all children subject to their ability to keep up with the work, of course.
I don't have a problem with this at all. Quite a few schools in Quebec already do this, and offer Spanish as a third language after French (first) and English (second).
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Old 08-03-2011, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
10,166 posts, read 11,137,265 times
Reputation: 3925
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick99 View Post
I clearly said 'globally relevant' languages, ie. on the possibility that the kid won't stay here when grown and be forced to use a language that is virtually irrelevant on the global scale
And that's why I referred to the likelihood of a kid staying close to home once all grown up.

If you take the following places in order:
1) Ottawa and environs
2) elsewhere in Ontario
3) elswhere in Canada
4) somewhere in the U.S.

You will probably cover off the adult settlement locations for 99% of kids currently growing up in Kanata or Barrhaven. With the lion's share (80 to 90%) remaining in the Ottawa area.

In light of this fact, there is no doubt that the most useful second language for them to learn is French, by a longshot.

We aren't going to start teaching Malaysian to all our kids in Ottawa on the off chance that one kid out of 10,000 is destined to become CFO of Petronas in Kuala Lumpur one day... sorry.
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Old 08-03-2011, 09:38 AM
 
9 posts, read 9,036 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
And that's why I referred to the likelihood of a kid staying close to home once all grown up.

If you take the following places in order:
1) Ottawa and environs
2) elsewhere in Ontario
3) elswhere in Canada
4) somewhere in the U.S.

You will probably cover off the adult settlement locations for 99% of kids currently growing up in Kanata or Barrhaven. With the lion's share (80 to 90%) remaining in the Ottawa area.

In light of this fact, there is no doubt that the most useful second language for them to learn is French, by a longshot.

We aren't going to start teaching Malaysian to all our kids in Ottawa on the off chance that one kid out of 10,000 is destined to become CFO of Petronas in Kuala Lumpur one day... sorry.

Well said!
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Old 12-07-2011, 09:17 PM
 
4 posts, read 7,696 times
Reputation: 10
Default Cost of heating in Aylmer (long winter)

Hi All,
Just joined in as my wife and I, along our two little daughters, are looking at properties to purchase in Aylmer area. Much of our questions are addressed. Considering that winters are long and colder here how much would the furnace/heating for an 1800 sqft semi detached would cost? I know there could be many variables but just a general idea. The furnace is quite old, at a property we are looking right now, but seems in good condition.

Also, how is the resell market these days and some projections for future. I read all postings here but did not see (perhaps I missed) any serious comments about resell values of the homes. My agent's views on everything just being fine led me to post these questions.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

m2h71
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Old 12-08-2011, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
10,166 posts, read 11,137,265 times
Reputation: 3925
It depends on what you use for your heating (hydro, natural gas, oil), but generally I would expect about 125 dollars per month averaged out over the year. The coldest month of the winter will probably be 300-400 dollars, but most utilities allow you to average out your payments over 12 months.
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