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Old 09-20-2017, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Machjo View Post
Some Ottawa neighbourhoods can be quite French-speaking, true.
To be perfectly honest there aren't really any neighbourhoods that one could call "French-speaking" in Ottawa any more, though there are quite a few where you'll hear some French most every time you're out and about.
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Old 09-20-2017, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GM10 View Post
I agree with that. I think the reason why it felt more bilingual to me is because most of the signs were both in English and French. In Montreal all of the signs are in French only and in other cities they are in English only. That's why it felt unique in Ottawa showing a construction sign having both languages on it.
When it comes to bilingualism, one could say the Ottawa talks the talk, and Montreal walks the walk.
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Old 09-21-2017, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Machjo View Post
There might exist an Ottawa neighbourhood where French dominates over English, but I've not seen one myself..

I don't know how old you are, but there used to be quite a number. If by what we mean by French dominating that more often than not you were greeted with a spontaneous "bonjour" in many businesses. As recently as the 1980s places like Vanier and Orleans and parts of Overbrook and Lowertown were like that. If you go further back parts of Hintonburg-Mechanicsville, Sandy Hill and the bulldozed LeBreton Flats were also like that.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Machjo View Post
Not yet anyway.

.

I wouldn't use "yet" because things aren't going in that direction. That ship has sailed. There won't be any neighbourhoods like that any more in Ottawa.
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Old 09-21-2017, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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I don't know every stretch of street in the city so yeah that might exist.

This past summer I went to the Montfort hospital quite a bit to visit an ailing relative, and I noticed that French basically didn't go any further than the hospital grounds. Basically all of the businesses surrounding it operate in English only in terms of signage and the language skills of staff. You'd think otherwise what with even other francophone stuff like a French high school and the La Cité collégiale community college nearby, but nope.
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Old 09-22-2017, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Machjo View Post
This make me somewhat curious though. other language communities congregate and organize to maintain their language, whereas the French-speaking community (at least in Ottawa) makes little effort to do the same. I'm guilty of that myself. We just want to live close to work, or close to friends, or shops, not necessarily close to other French speakers. I can think of three possible explanations, none necessarily mutually exclusive:

1. We don't care enough about French.

2. We know English so can function quite comfortably in English.

3. Official bilingualism gives us a false sense of official security that unofficial language communities do not enjoy. As a result, while they take practical steps to promote their languages, we just petition governments to do so on our behalf while we live our lives.
I think you're right that all three factors enter into it.


It's worth noting that Franco-Ontarians used to do this in Ottawa. All over the city there are former pockets of faded francophonie that used to be centred around a church, a school, a caisse populaire and a few other businesses. A good example is in the inner west end along Wellington St. West in Hintonburg-Mechanicsville. You still have both St-François-d'Assise church and school there, but the caisse pop I am pretty sure and all the other businesses are long gone.


Those who care enough about such things have mostly moved to the Quebec side or communities that are still francophone in Prescott-Russell. Some also move(d) to Orleans and tell themselves that they too have moved to a place that's francophone, even if the reality on the ground there doesn't really bear that out.
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Old 09-22-2017, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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That's an interesting idea I had never thought of.


I am personally in favour of a certain form of Swiss-style language territoriality for Canada but this I am pretty sure would never go as far as to do away with minority language educational institutions.


As for the other stuff in many cases I doubt that saying that Ontario or Manitoba, etc. are "English only but with some French schools" would change much in the fortunes of the francophone communities there. Most francophones don't use French language services in my experience, or use them only occasionally.

As for the spreading out vs. concentration of Ottawa francophones a lot of people see this as a sign of the community's maturity and strength. You also see this mindset in the Franco-Ontarian community's pursuit of its own French-only university in... Toronto. As if these francophone pioneers are going to carve out a place in the sun for French in the 416. In the meantime French is bleeding fairly severely in eastern and northeastern Ontario - the only two parts of the province where it has decent critical mass.


I was never in agreement with these views and this is one of the main reasons I chose to move to Quebec to raise my family.
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