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Old 08-18-2007, 08:20 AM
 
2,134 posts, read 3,416,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Picassine View Post
although I agree that some kids are not behaved... I think that family restaurants are just that... places for parents and kids...

Next time, maybe you want to go to an upscale restaurant where you won't find kids.

I know there are lots of little monsters out there, parents don't give a 'hoot' about their offsprings... but I also noticed a LOT of impatient adults around kids.... expecting a 4 year old to behave like a 25 year old. Kids are kids.
I understand the concept of "family restaurant". When I go into a Denny's or the like I realize there will be kids, some happy and content, some fussy, some crying, some even screaming.

What I don't understand, even in a "family restaurant" is the parents that let their kid run circles around the restaurant, scream incessantly without taking them outside, kick the back of peoples booths, throw food, etc. It's called common courtesy and if you have any sense you show this to the other patrons. Plus, you had the kid, it is your job to raise it to be a civilized human being, not a monkey.

I've seen idiots do this in upscale places, too. It has nothing to do with how much money a person has...just the amount of sense they have.

Give me a break, most adults don't expect a 4 year old to act like an adult. WHAT MOST ADULTS DO EXPECT IS FOR THEIR PARENTS TO ACT LIKE ADULTS AND TAKE CARE OF THEIR CHILDREN WHILE IN PUBLIC.

 
Old 08-19-2007, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Canada
109 posts, read 394,135 times
Reputation: 65
Default Umm..

Quote:
Originally Posted by Elmonellie View Post
I understand the concept of "family restaurant". When I go into a Denny's or the like I realize there will be kids, some happy and content, some fussy, some crying, some even screaming.

What I don't understand, even in a "family restaurant" is the parents that let their kid run circles around the restaurant, scream incessantly without taking them outside, kick the back of peoples booths, throw food, etc. It's called common courtesy and if you have any sense you show this to the other patrons. Plus, you had the kid, it is your job to raise it to be a civilized human being, not a monkey.

I've seen idiots do this in upscale places, too. It has nothing to do with how much money a person has...just the amount of sense they have.

Give me a break, most adults don't expect a 4 year old to act like an adult. WHAT MOST ADULTS DO EXPECT IS FOR THEIR PARENTS TO ACT LIKE ADULTS AND TAKE CARE OF THEIR CHILDREN WHILE IN PUBLIC.
Although I agree that some parents don,t give a 'hoot' about how their children behave in public...I would think that the only thing that one can do is ask the waiter to get you another table...

What else can you do? Not much.
 
Old 08-19-2007, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Mayberry
31,614 posts, read 12,736,888 times
Reputation: 68420
I was a single mom and my daughter was very good, not an angel by any means, we were with my folks going to a family reunion, been in the car a long time and stopped to eat. Well, my DD decided to crawl under the table and fool around a bit and my Dad, pulled her out, sat her down and told her, do not move!! It scared the crap out of her and she never forgot that. Today she is 31 and is wonderful!!! I agree, that parents give in too much, it's easier than dealing with the situation especially in public, where I think it is more important to deal with it at the time....
 
Old 08-19-2007, 01:57 PM
 
1,428 posts, read 2,777,774 times
Reputation: 1460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elmonellie View Post
Give me a break, most adults don't expect a 4 year old to act like an adult. WHAT MOST ADULTS DO EXPECT IS FOR THEIR PARENTS TO ACT LIKE ADULTS AND TAKE CARE OF THEIR CHILDREN WHILE IN PUBLIC.

I think it would be wise for the restaurant manager to come up to tables where the children are quite obviously interfering with the smooth operation of the restaurant (for example, by running around) or with the reasonable enjoyment of other diners (for example, by throwing food, kicking booths, or making excessive noise) and asking those patrons to please control their children. If they persist, the restaurant has the right to refuse service to anyone it chooses; I honestly think that managers who don't take a more assertive tack lose more business by permitting bad behavior than they would lose if they told the patrons of the disruptive children to leave.

They also open themselves up to liability lawsuits, because as sure as God made little green apples, if a waitress at Denny's spilt hot coffee on a child running into her, the family of the child would probably sue and hold the waitress and restaurant chain liable for the child's medical treatment.
 
Old 08-21-2007, 11:52 AM
 
268 posts, read 1,007,493 times
Reputation: 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
I give up.
Good... You should.... Unless you live as a parent of a child with autism. DON'T JUDGE!!!! It is very hard to control a tantruming autistic child who can be stronger then you.

Read a little on autism. You obviously don't know a thing about it.
 
Old 08-21-2007, 11:58 AM
 
268 posts, read 1,007,493 times
Reputation: 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elmonellie View Post
Again, I say that if you know your child is disabled in a way that they can and do act uncontrollably at any time a restaurant is not a good choice. The other patrons are trapped there. People are sympathetic for the most part, but generally, not in a restaurant. Do the parents deserve a night out, I guess as much as the next patron. They, IMHO, don't deserve to inflict the patrons of a restaurant with a child that may ruin everyones meal.
So, I suppose you say we should lock ourselves in the house to PLEASE everyone else.

and, NO.. most people stare... God forbid they ask to lend a hand.

Get for real.... Just as people cause gridlocks on roads when there is the most minor of an accident... they stare at those who are different from themselves.... I CALL THAT IGNORANCE... I can understand a glimpse, a look.. but to STARE!!!! You are rude if you do...
 
Old 08-21-2007, 05:06 PM
 
2,134 posts, read 3,416,658 times
Reputation: 602
Quote:
Originally Posted by autimom4ever View Post
So, I suppose you say we should lock ourselves in the house to PLEASE everyone else.

and, NO.. most people stare... God forbid they ask to lend a hand.

Get for real.... Just as people cause gridlocks on roads when there is the most minor of an accident... they stare at those who are different from themselves.... I CALL THAT IGNORANCE... I can understand a glimpse, a look.. but to STARE!!!! You are rude if you do...
It is common courtesy to NOT bring an out of control kid to a restaurant. You are free to be rude and inflict your out of control kid on others, trapped in a restaurant. Nobody is telling you to lock yourself in the house. Bad choice to bring the kid to a restaurant, IMHO.

I'm sure people stare if the kid is making a huge commotion. Some nice person may ask to lend a hand, but honestly, they have gone out to eat not to help babysit an out of control child.

I think it is you who is rude for inflicting an obviously out of control at any moment on people who are paying for a meal.
 
Old 08-21-2007, 05:31 PM
 
Location: The Great State of Arkansas
5,981 posts, read 15,936,431 times
Reputation: 7531
Exclamation Could we settle down just a hair?

And I think we're all getting a little too heated...could we tone it down just a fraction and refrain from calling people rude and ignorant? Nothing wrong with explaining your side, but let's do it in a polite way. This is obviously a very emotional topic for everyone.
 
Old 08-21-2007, 06:18 PM
 
1,428 posts, read 2,777,774 times
Reputation: 1460
Quote:
Originally Posted by autimom4ever View Post
So, I suppose you say we should lock ourselves in the house to PLEASE everyone else.

and, NO.. most people stare... God forbid they ask to lend a hand.

Get for real.... Just as people cause gridlocks on roads when there is the most minor of an accident... they stare at those who are different from themselves.... I CALL THAT IGNORANCE... I can understand a glimpse, a look.. but to STARE!!!! You are rude if you do...
Would it actually be helpful to lend a hand, or would it be taken as interference? I've thought of asking before, but thought I would be rebuffed, so I have stared covertly and tried not to be obvious about it.
 
Old 08-22-2007, 03:50 AM
 
Location: The Great State of Arkansas
5,981 posts, read 15,936,431 times
Reputation: 7531
Oh, Charles...I think that would vary with the child and the parents, as well as the situation. People are ready to assume the worst these days, even with folks trying to be helpful. I think with kids who are autistic or whatever, although someone may have good intentions - well, I know when my nephew has meltdown he is somewhat removed from the world. No one can really calm him too much if he's having a hard time, much less someone he doesn't know. If it's just a child who has gone a little off kilter, a distraction may do some good - again, you have to worry about the parents' reaction. What a very strange world we live in...

The incidence of running into a family out to eat with a child with a true "disorder" (for lack of better wording) is, I suppose, relatively rare. I agree with the other posters that children shouldn't be just allowed to run wild and be an annoyance, but there are some circumstances that show that what appears to be may not be what you think. A little observation - and empathy - can go a long way there.
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