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Old 06-23-2007, 09:07 PM
 
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Two-year-old 'Matilda' becomes youngest ever girl in Mensa | the Daily Mail (http://tinyurl.com/3xl9av - broken link)

The brain is fascinating. I will spare you my 'Deep Thoughts' on that tonight.
I hope for the good of the species we learn much more and apply the knowledge.

I hope this child will receive the guidance and nurture that will allow all her gifts to be fully developed.

I think there is a fine line between genius and 'madness'. Respond as you will--I never care about 'On/Off Topic', FWIW.

Brain, giftedness, mental illness--all of interest to me.
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Old 06-23-2007, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Rocket City, U.S.A.
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I find it fascinating and hope that the child will not be exploited (since that seems to be happening already...ahem).

It will be very interesting to see how a toddler gifted with graded genius applies her ability as she ages.

But this was a strange statement:

Professor Freeman said: "I said to her, 'What a pretty pink skirt, and you have tights and shoes to match'.

"She said, 'They're not pink, they're purple'. Most children go to school aged five and start to learn colours, let alone knowing the difference between pink and purple.


FIVE?

My daughter started learning her alphabet, numbers as soon as she could talk and we've had regression (she often "forgets" what she previously knew...which means she is uninterested) but she already knows all her colors and matching hues - she knew colors at 2. Tell her once and it's etched in to her brain - because that IS interesting to her.
Pink VS. purple is not a great measurement of intelligence.

I'm sure the testing was a bit more in depth than that.

P.S.
My brother is Mensa material...I am not.
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Old 06-24-2007, 06:45 AM
 
Location: State College PA
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I have a 2 and 4 year old....

I think too many parents WAY try to push their children. My four year old is reading....I suppose he learned it thru day care and the fact we read to him nightly. We have never bought a "baby einstein" video or anything else...because they seem ridiculous to me. Certainly you should try to teach things about the world around you while they're not in school yet, but there's definately an overboard. And they all progress at their own rate.

And when you bring your child at 2 to someone to see if they're a genius or not, that's going overboard...the child will start feeling pressure (as soon as her mind understands it)....Let her be a CHILD!!!!!
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Old 06-24-2007, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Far Western KY
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If she hasn't expanded on the theory and practices of Black Holes, theoretical cosmology and quantum gravity she's not as smart as Stephen Hawkings. Perhaps one day, but not yet.
I was in Mensa (lapsed membership) and know a number of members ... trust me a many of them really aren't the bright. Book and puzzle smarts does not equal common sense.
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Old 06-24-2007, 02:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davart View Post
If she hasn't expanded on the theory and practices of Black Holes, theoretical cosmology and quantum gravity she's not as smart as Stephen Hawkings. Perhaps one day, but not yet.
I was in Mensa (lapsed membership) and know a number of members ... trust me a many of them really aren't the bright. Book and puzzle smarts does not equal common sense.
I assume the testing was more in depth.

What I would like to know--is how the areas of the brain correlate ie control of fine motor skills and language acquisition.

I believe that many 2 yr olds might distinguish between pink and purple--with older brothers and sisters, parents and others providing stimulation and reinforcement consistently.
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Old 06-24-2007, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Home is where we park it.
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Did you know that Stephen Hawking did not start off exhibiting those smarts?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Hawking
Quote:
He was always interested in science. He enrolled at University College, Oxford with the intent of studying mathematics, although his father preferred he go into medicine. Since mathematics were not offered at University College, Hawking instead chose physics. His interests during this time were in thermodynamics, relativity, and quantum mechanics. His physics tutor, Robert Berman, later said in the New York Times Magazine, "It was only necessary for him to know that something could be done, and he could do it without looking to see how other people did it. ... He didn't have very many books, and he didn't take notes. Of course, his mind was completely different from all of his contemporaries." He was passing with his fellow students, but his unimpressive study habits gave him a final examination score on the borderline between first and second class honours, making an "oral examination" necessary. Berman said of the oral examination, "And of course the examiners then were intelligent enough to realize they were talking to someone far more clever than most of themselves.
It wasn't until after his ALS diagnosis and his marriage in 1965, that he decided to turn his life around. Liz
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Old 06-25-2007, 06:33 AM
 
8,862 posts, read 14,385,501 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernlady5464 View Post
Did you know that Stephen Hawking did not start off exhibiting those smarts?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Hawking


It wasn't until after his ALS diagnosis and his marriage in 1965, that he decided to turn his life around. Liz
His story really gives one something to think about. Throughout history there have been a small percentage of individuals that,imo, are beyond analysis.
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Old 06-25-2007, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Home is where we park it.
3,091 posts, read 8,206,773 times
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Quote:
His story really gives one something to think about. Throughout history there have been a small percentage of individuals that,imo, are beyond analysis.
Exactly. Plus the fact that he has defied the odds for ALS. SO MANY die of ALS within 5 years and he has had it for OVER 40 years. WHY??? What made him so different? Only about 10% typically live up to 10 years with ALS but he has been here FORTY!!! The man is amazing. And to write so many papers as well. Liz
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Old 06-25-2007, 07:57 AM
 
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My sil is extremely bright. Very educated, loves to read, have political discussions etc.

She has horrendous people skills.

It would be great if there was a balance.
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Old 06-25-2007, 03:32 PM
 
8,862 posts, read 14,385,501 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernlady5464 View Post
Exactly. Plus the fact that he has defied the odds for ALS. SO MANY die of ALS within 5 years and he has had it for OVER 40 years. WHY??? What made him so different? Only about 10% typically live up to 10 years with ALS but he has been here FORTY!!! The man is amazing. And to write so many papers as well. Liz
I suppose there will be research conducted until someone unravels the mystery of Stephen Hawkings.

Maybe that is necessary--highly invasive and how he has withstood that is another question.

I have drawn my own conclusions--beyond the gathering of scientific data.

There was a recent article about a gifted child in Atlanta that was selected to attend Mary Baldwin College as a preteen (cannot recall the exact age). After two years (maybe one--it was a few weeks ago when I read the article) she was very homesick and returned to Atlanta to attend either Agnes Scott or Emory. One of the youngest to graduate from the instution she selected. Her parents sounded very down to earth--always good news.

Last edited by Marka; 06-25-2007 at 05:00 PM.. Reason: repaired code
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