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Old 06-28-2007, 05:47 AM
 
Location: FL
1,943 posts, read 7,626,018 times
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I would hope that schools do not leave the brightest kids behind. I know that in my earlier post I stated that at my school (I was actually using my own examples), we test children for being gifted. We surely do not leave them behind. We don't even leave the high achievers behind. Just as we have to recognize the learning disabled and teach their way, so to we have to do for the other end of the spectrum. I expect more from my higer children. They might get different rubrics, different directions, different work on the same standards. Different projects. Different centers. Reading on THEIR level, despite the age/grade. This is all for children that haven't even been proven gifted-just higher. Once they are tested and are proven gifted, we have a gifted teacher that also comes and takes them once a week, to further their thinking skills. I know you might be thinking once a week isn't much...but it's on top of what the classroom teacher is already doing. Then they will be placed in a blended class the following year (if really gifted, that year-but most parents don't want their child switched during the same year), that teachers gifted and HIGH achievers-we have one such class for each grade level. So it isn't just for gifted, but for the higher achievers.

But more parents do think that their child is a gifted or really high achiever child then there are actually children that can be categorized as either.

 
Old 06-28-2007, 06:57 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,374 posts, read 40,148,217 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrshvo View Post

But more parents do think that their child is a gifted or really high achiever child then there are actually children that can be categorized as either.
Yes, this can be a running joke among faculty and admin, (yet not so fun dealing with it.)
Once a week and blended class is better than nothing at all, which is what some gifted kids get (especially the ones who are never identified.)
It doesn't have to be all about academics, either.
Finding a mentor for a gifted child can be a wonderful opportunity and make a huge difference in the life path a child takes.
This is getting away from the original discussion about gifted little ones.
I'd still probably wait until 3 for testing.
 
Old 06-28-2007, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,958 posts, read 98,776,620 times
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jco:
Quote:
Please don't think my sister is pushing her into anything. Basically, she's just worried that she'll end up getting bored if she's not challenged.
My personal opinion, from 23 yrs of parenting and more as a pediatric nurse, is that it's pretty hard for a two year old to be bored due to lack of challenge. They are just starting out. An advanced two year old is still just two years old. Most pre-school programs don't even start until 2 1/2 or even 3, and most are not academic oriented. They teach kids to play, to belong to a group, and the world around them. There is still a lot for a two year old to learn! I remember driving my then 3 yr old to preschool and she said, "look Mom, there's a line in the sky!" It was an airplane trail. We talked about it. That is the kind of learning a two year old needs.
 
Old 06-28-2007, 12:50 PM
 
7,099 posts, read 23,885,607 times
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She must not fret about the child being bored at this age. Learning how to deal with boredom is a vital life skill. If the 'play' is there, and directed by the mother, the child isn't learning how to cope with it on her own. Down time is needed so that they learn to develop imagination and to play quietly by themselves. The day need not be always filled with fun things to do.

Now, there is a line of software that has been developed for toddlers. It teaches the use of a computer and the tasks are more like puzzles than academic learning. The child is taught to think. Very important. I believe the series is called "The Learning Tree" or something similar. I would get the first disk which is for Toddlers. Then, let her do her own thing with it. Mom should forget trying to encourage her or teach.
 
Old 06-28-2007, 01:59 PM
jco jco started this thread
 
Location: Austin
2,120 posts, read 5,860,936 times
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Quote:
Now, there is a line of software that has been developed for toddlers. It teaches the use of a computer and the tasks are more like puzzles than academic learning. The child is taught to think. Very important. I believe the series is called "The Learning Tree" or something similar. I would get the first disk which is for Toddlers. Then, let her do her own thing with it. Mom should forget trying to encourage her or teach.
Thanks. This is all I was asking for originally! I'll look into the software. I did a search online and found an association for gifted kids. Sometimes, even if you don't want to get caught up in the hype, it's just nice to learn about what we can do as parents to encourage our kids.

My niece asks her to teach her things, so I don't think my sister will stop teaching her when she asks!
 
Old 06-28-2007, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,958 posts, read 98,776,620 times
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Honestly, I'd skeptical of this software. Who is going to be working the computer? Mom or dad, probably. Baby needs to learn about the world around her. Of course her mom should teach her. That's a mother's job, as well as a father's, assuming one is involved. What is this program meant to teach?

I have seen kids who were given computer programs to learn who were no farther advanced than kids who didn't have them. (My kids grew up just on the 'cusp' of the computer age.) I honestly do not think a comuter program for two year olds can teach them how to 'think'. Just my opinion, but I do have a nursing degree with coursework in child development and have worked in pediatrics for many (too many) years.
 
Old 06-28-2007, 03:47 PM
 
Location: The #1 sunshine state, Arizona.
12,172 posts, read 15,004,541 times
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Call Mensa!
 
Old 06-28-2007, 04:12 PM
jco jco started this thread
 
Location: Austin
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I'm closing this thread. It's going nowhere.
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