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Old 11-06-2010, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Wallis and Futuna
11,294 posts, read 17,116,719 times
Reputation: 16629

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I don't see it as the teacher being more boring than the fly on the wall. I see it as a missing filter. You can put 10 people at the corner of a busy intersection in NYC - give them 20 minutes of just standing there, with no specific instructions other than to stand there, and not intentionally do anything else (such as - turn the cell phone off, don't read a book, don't have a conversation with any of the other 9 people with you).

After 20 minutes, bring them somewhere to sit and have them write down everything the observed for the past 20 minutes.

The person with "ADD" (I use the term loosely because I don't believe it is a disorder) will have the most varied experience out of the bunch. Their experience might be disjointed, and not be in order, skip around from thought to thought. But the people with ADD lack the usual social filters that allow information-gathering to progress in a logical order in their minds. And so, they see everything, they experience everything, all at the same time. It all comes at them. BOOM BOOM BOOM. There is nothing in their heads saying "ignore that, we need to pay attention to this." or "put this on hold just a second - something RED just showed up".

Everyone else will tell you only what they were paying attention to. And they will not recall experiencing anything else. That is because their minds filtered out everything they weren't paying attention to. The ADD mind pays attention to EVERYTHING, because it has no other option. The off switch is missing. I consider it an ability, not a disorder. The trick is teaching the mind how to make use of it.

To use the previous post as an example:

The person with ADD will be distracted by the fly on the wall. The people who lack that ability, won't even realize the fly existed.
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Old 11-06-2010, 04:08 PM
 
Location: middle of everywhere
1,628 posts, read 2,540,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rkb0305 View Post
I see you replied to almost everyone but me. You have a diagnosis. Use it to your child's advantage. The school can better meet her needs, but you need to be proactive to get help. I don't know why you wouldn't do that for her.
Thank you- it was only an oversight, I will be speaking to her teacher when we have a sit down next week about every option. The 504 plan is at the top of the list, I will do some more research on the IEP issue. If the school is a big part of this issue, I would hate to have my daughter labeled when she will be going to a slower paced school that has recess everyday.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CMMom View Post
I'm sorry; I haven't read the whole thread super carefully, but...

You mentioned that your psychiatrist said that meds won't help a child with ADHD, Primarily Inattentive Type. I'm a clinical psychologist, and that is simply hogwash. Stimulant medication helps with both inattention and overactivity/impulsivity. Simply put, it helps the child be "more available" for learning. It will not make them more organized or teach them life skills, but it does work on the part of the brain that helps to sustain focus.

If that is really what the psychiatrist said, you need to be shopping for a new psychiatrist. Now, there are other factors that may weigh against a child taking stimulants (a history of tics in the child or the family, heart problems, OCD, etc...), but to say that Primarily Inattentive type ADHD doesn't respond to meds is simply bad information.

Feel free to DM me if you have more questions or want references to show the psychiatrist.
That is exactly what she said- the second line after telling me she has ADHD (she didn't say ADD) innatentive type. I will make some more calls for another psychiatrist. Everyone that I happened to call is booked up until January, so I'll have to go outside my local area perhaps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
If she isn't hyperactive, then she doesn't have ADHD. The H in that stands for Hyperactive. She might have ADD, or, she might just be one of those remarkably brilliant kids who are so above the level of their classmates that they act out as a result of sheer boredom. Or, she might just be chock full of kinetic energy and needs an outlet.

Also, if you have to -schedule- cuddle time, then something's not right. No child should have to make an appointment with her mother for a cuddle. Those should be coming spontaneously, for any reason, and for no reason other than "man this kid is awesome, I gotta give her a squeeze!" I don't recommend scheduled cuddle time. I recommend generous cuddles, any time.
I wouldn't make her schedule time to cuddle. After the poster brought it up, her suggestion was perfect because my daughter is very affectionate. Seeing that she has to read for school and her own benefit, I haven't actually read to her in a while, I sit next to her while watching her. Now I will do both.
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Old 11-06-2010, 04:12 PM
 
Location: middle of everywhere
1,628 posts, read 2,540,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
She may need that, but I still think she needs to very carefully look at environmental issues before going that route; the OP noted in one of the earlier posts that her daughter says they rarely get recess. There's ample research out there to show that getting activity is vital for kids; the "recess not Ritalin" issue sounds like it could fit here.

A useful recent report from the CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/heal...a-pe_paper.pdf

And an article about the report and some more details about incorporating short bursts of activity into the school day:
David Katz, M.D.: Attention Deficit Disorder: Ritalin Or Recess?

If she's not getting the chance to move around during the school day, then the problem, or at least part of the issue, is with the school, not with her.
She told me the children have silent lunch, where after eating lunch they are sent to the auditorium to sit quietly and read. After this, and only if the kids are 'good' are they allowed to go outside to play for a bit.

I know when she went to her North Carolina school, the children were able to go out and burn off steam everyday. As a matter of fact she would come home and talk about her legs hurting from running at recess. Not in a bad way of course, because after her homework was completed she still went out to play with the other children on the block.
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Old 11-06-2010, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Australia
1,489 posts, read 1,738,459 times
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At the very east tell the teacher that you are 100% behind the teacher.

Work with the teacher to implement consistent responses to her behaviour at home and school.
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Old 11-06-2010, 06:03 PM
 
Location: IL
12,159 posts, read 6,100,680 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitterific View Post
She told me the children have silent lunch, where after eating lunch they are sent to the auditorium to sit quietly and read. After this, and only if the kids are 'good' are they allowed to go outside to play for a bit.

I know when she went to her North Carolina school, the children were able to go out and burn off steam everyday. As a matter of fact she would come home and talk about her legs hurting from running at recess. Not in a bad way of course, because after her homework was completed she still went out to play with the other children on the block.
Yeah, reading stuff like this makes me mad. Little kids are just not ready to sit still quietly for hours on end. The teachers are shooting themselves in the feet if you ask me. My daughter is quite capable of learning in an environment such as the one you describe, but my son just cannot do it.
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Old 11-06-2010, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Wallis and Futuna
11,294 posts, read 17,116,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zimbochick View Post
Yeah, reading stuff like this makes me mad. Little kids are just not ready to sit still quietly for hours on end. The teachers are shooting themselves in the feet if you ask me. My daughter is quite capable of learning in an environment such as the one you describe, but my son just cannot do it.
You can thank hovermoms for these ridiculous policies. Little Johnny stubbed his toe at recess, and Mommy got her lawyer to visit the Superintendent of Schools for a friendly little chat. Six months later, for the health and welfare of the school's precious darlings, recess is no longer allowed.

And then there was Susie whose fellow students teased her in the playground and at lunch because she considers herself superior to the other children, and takes great effort to let them know. She is, afterall, Mommy's Special Princess and can do no wrong, and struts around like a diva - even though she has no talent at all.

So she comes home whining to mommy, who calls the local ABC affiliate TV station, offering some insight on bullying in her Princess Girl's school. Three months later, the school institutes mandatory silent lunches, followed by quiet reading in the auditorium.

Thanks Mom, for improving our school systems and keeping our children happy and healthy!
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Old 11-07-2010, 11:22 PM
 
10,263 posts, read 7,748,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malamute View Post
I would also guess that schools in Europe where the kids are at a significantly higher level than those in the USA have much fewer diagnoses of ADD and ADHD. Our pharmaceutical companies are making a killing on all the drugs being handed out right and left.
Nope.

The incidence of ADHD is the same in Europe as in the US.

Is ADHD more prevalent in the U.S. than in Europe? | FoundHealth

Quote:
The prevalence of ADHD in Europe is about the same as it is in the U.S., roughly 1 and 20 children. In 2003, Stephen V. Faraone analyzed the findings of 50 studies around the world and concluded that the prevalence of ADHD was at least as high in non-U.S. countries as it was in this country. This was especially true when the DSM-IV was used to make the diagnosis.
The Worldwide Prevalence of ADHD: A Systematic Review and Metaregression Analysis -- Polanczyk et al. 164 (6): 942 -- Am J Psychiatry
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Old 11-10-2010, 06:57 PM
 
3,425 posts, read 6,418,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aconite View Post
I would strongly suggest that if the child is the one setting the rules, it's not the IEP which is the problem.

An IEP because of ADHD does not require the work be "dumbed down". What it will do is create an environment where the playing field is leveled, enabling the child to learn at whatever her real potential is (and there are plenty of kids who are ADHD and capable of Honors and advanced work, fwiw).
I agree.

I have a child who is both ADHD and qualified as gifted through testing done by the ed diagnostician this past spring (actually my older one fits this description as well). The school psych told me kids who have this combination can be incredibly challenging to work with but having them do more challenging work can really help - and I have seen this. I cannot imagine what kind of ill effect dumbing down of work would have. Learning to read has also been a watershed event in two of my boys' lives as far as learning to self-calm and focus.

My younger one who would live with his nintendo DS permanently attached to his hands if I let him has been very responsive to computer-based interactive learning. Some schools use this more than others. His school uses "ticket to read" which we can also access from home. He loves it. A poster up the thread mentioned magnet schools that may use different approaches to learning - this might be something to consider if available. We recently moved to a large school district and the magnet offerings here are amazing. My oldest is in a very challenging magnet school where he does not stick out like a sore thumb. Its a great experience for him.

An IEP can be really helpful. It allows the teachers to express the problems they are having, and for you to share yours as well, and for the team (which includes the parent(s)) to collaborate on accommodations that will work.
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Old 03-29-2011, 08:53 AM
 
Location: middle of everywhere
1,628 posts, read 2,540,528 times
Reputation: 1106
Quote:
Originally Posted by aidxen View Post
At the very east tell the teacher that you are 100% behind the teacher.

Work with the teacher to implement consistent responses to her behaviour at home and school.
When I speak with the teacher, I let her know I will do what she has suggested. Actually, I did it before she suggested it, which was taking away priviledges when rules were not followed. It really does not seem to be helping very much. Grandma had the same idea....my sister overheard, and laughed saying that DD would play with a pencil if she didn't have any toys.

So the teacher, and my method obviously isn't working. Outside of that she says there really isn't anything to do and did not agree when I told her I was looking into meds.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lisdol View Post
An IEP can be really helpful. It allows the teachers to express the problems they are having, and for you to share yours as well, and for the team (which includes the parent(s)) to collaborate on accommodations that will work.
Would an IEP work at the stage of school year? The state exam is early May. Now all of a sudden the work being taught is ALL about the test. My daughter comes home with 15 pages of workbook questions a night. The amount isn't the issue, but how vastly it changed overnight certainly is!

Last edited by Glitterific; 03-29-2011 at 09:14 AM..
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Old 03-29-2011, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
12,323 posts, read 12,067,435 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitterific View Post
I can see that happening to her. I sit with her to do her homework, and she will be mid-sentence thenstart talking about something completely different . I have to interrupt her to get back to what she was doing.

It kills me to have to go this IEP route. I just hate the idea. Although I would hate her being left back even more.

I feel your pain. I have family like that, so picture a room full of adults like that, with ADHD, it is impossible to have a true conversation of substance without getting interrupted 1 million times, also very draining. The when i finally find someone to talk to , the ADHD family interrupt. so fustrating, and I know they cannot help it.

Your child probably should be on meds, but as a parent who wants to do that to a child. i do sympathize with you. i really do.
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