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Old 11-30-2010, 05:16 AM
 
Location: 500 miles from home
27,261 posts, read 15,048,153 times
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Well, I agree that I don't want him to have TOO much time on his hands.

It would be possible to drop the Club Swim - though his HS coach encourages it; because that is where you get all your good training. The HS team only gets the pool for so many hours, etc.

But I agree - this is a possibility.

We are going to see this year through, of course, and then reflect on whether or not we will continue the club swim. There are some on the team that don't club swim; they strictly practice with their HS team. They are not as good; but still seem to enjoy it and being part of a team.
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Old 11-30-2010, 05:33 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabinerose View Post
Some sports are crazy hardcore. My son started full contact football in the first grade. No flag football where we lived... regular pads, helmets and tackles. The whole community was involved. We lived, ate, dreamed and breathed football year-round. In the first grade, he was doing 5-nights-a-week / 3 hours a night practices. The games were all day on Saturdays. Most nights we packed a "tailgate" style dinner and ate at the practice field... you simply didn't drop your son off for practice and come back 3 hours later to get him. When these boys got into junior high school, they would join both teams (the community ball club and the schools team). School practice was right after school for 2 hours and then they would go directly to community practice for 3 hours. My thought was always that "if they didn't love it, they wouldn't do it". I don't think a boy (or girl) will put that much time and effort into a sport, if they didn't love it and were dedicated to it.
Yes football is totally hardcore. My boys started at 6 or 7 and are totally into it. During football season my oldest son goes from school to his high school practice and then goes out to the youth field and is on the coaching staff there. Then he gets home and does whatever school work he couldn't finish during is independent period at school.

I don't know how he does it but he truly loves the sport.
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Old 11-30-2010, 05:48 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Ringo1 View Post
Yes, but do those sports have a season? With swimming - there is no break. Training is year-round, non-stop. Winter swim; Summer training and long-course; training trips. OH, and they are all going on a training trip, leaving CHRISTMAS DAY, to be back the last day of winter break. A training trip to Florida. This is something college teams do; I know; but high school?
Football and wrestling do have seasons but the serious kids train all year for both. Football players have spring football and summer workouts. Wrestlers enter youth tournaments all year and attend camps and clinics in the summer. My son doesn't do the winter workouts with the football team because he wrestles but he is expected to return to spring football in shape. He does his workouts at home with equipment we bought him.

My youngest plays lacrosse (my oldest gave it up after his sophmore year) and that goes all year also. Not every player does every tournament but there are tournaments in the off season. My son is a goalie so he is in high demand at 11 years old. We did a fall tournament in Tampa and spring tournaments locally.

As far as trips, those are common. I spent Thanksgiving in Daytona Beach at the National Youth Football Championships. That's right YOUTH football tournament over Thanksgiving weekend. We played kids from Chicago and Georgia and we met kids from NJ, Ohio, and St. Louis there. The kids had a blast playing football on the beach with kids from all over the country.

It's not uncommon to have these trips although not everyone takes them. It's ok to say no sometimes. The trips are fun for the kids so it's nice when they can go but not everyone goes on every trip.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ringo1 View Post
The most time he has taken off is a week after States last year. And even then, he was afraid, he would lose everything he had gained throughout the year. He was at practice this year, on Thanksgiving Day.
My oldest had football practice on Thanksgiving day also. They had a playoff game on Friday.

Is your son complaining? I know we all get worried about our kids. That's natural for parents. But what does HE think? At his age he should have some say in what he does. If he wants to cut back then I would do that. If he really loves it and is doing ok in school then let him be.
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Old 11-30-2010, 06:01 AM
 
Location: 500 miles from home
27,261 posts, read 15,048,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
Football and wrestling do have seasons but the serious kids train all year for both. Football players have spring football and summer workouts. Wrestlers enter youth tournaments all year and attend camps and clinics in the summer. My son doesn't do the winter workouts with the football team because he wrestles but he is expected to return to spring football in shape. He does his workouts at home with equipment we bought him.

My youngest plays lacrosse (my oldest gave it up after his sophmore year) and that goes all year also. Not every player does every tournament but there are tournaments in the off season. My son is a goalie so he is in high demand at 11 years old. We did a fall tournament in Tampa and spring tournaments locally.

As far as trips, those are common. I spent Thanksgiving in Daytona Beach at the National Youth Football Championships. That's right YOUTH football tournament over Thanksgiving weekend. We played kids from Chicago and Georgia and we met kids from NJ, Ohio, and St. Louis there. The kids had a blast playing football on the beach with kids from all over the country.

It's not uncommon to have these trips although not everyone takes them. It's ok to say no sometimes. The trips are fun for the kids so it's nice when they can go but not everyone goes on every trip.



My oldest had football practice on Thanksgiving day also. They had a playoff game on Friday.

Is your son complaining? I know we all get worried about our kids. That's natural for parents. But what does HE think? At his age he should have some say in what he does. If he wants to cut back then I would do that. If he really loves it and is doing ok in school then let him be.
Honestly, he's not complaining. He's just cranky all the time! But perhaps that is just his age.

Actually, he was all about it ~ until we went home for the holidays and he got a little taste of his old life; his old coach; his old friends . . . and has seemed a little unhappy ever since. Swimming in WV is not near as hard-core as swimming in OH.

But maybe this too shall pass and he'll be all about it again. Until we go home for Christmas!
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Old 11-30-2010, 06:43 AM
 
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Default Swim parent here

My daughter swims but she is only 11 and in 6th grade. Right now she swims 3 to 4 days per week for 1 1/2 hours a day. Soon she will be moving up a level and will need to swim 4 to 5 days a week for 2 hours a day. She also does dry land training which is an additional 1 to 2 hours per week. She also swims year round.

It is a HUGE time commitment for both the kids and parents, as well as a huge financial commitment. It's a rough schedule. Home from school, a little bit of homework, eat dinner, go to practice, come home and finish homework. There really is little time for socializing during the week, but in all honesty the majority of her friends are not around for socializing during the week either. Those that are not involved in anything I find are the ones who do not do as well in school and are often in trouble at school as well.

One thing I noticed with my daughter, if for whatever reason we have a week where she makes less practices, she actually becomes very lazy and less focused on her school work. When she comes home from practicing she is much more focused and completes her homework more quickly.

It is a competitive sport, and it is true that you get out of it what you put into it. The kids who swim less often do fall behind, but the great thing about the sport of swimming is the only one you really need to compete against is yourself and the clock. The kids are taught to know their fastest times and the times needed to achieve championship qualifications, and that is what they focus on. Rather than focusing on what place they come in relative to other kids, they focus on dropping time during meets.

Despite the fact that it is my daughter who does all the swimming, I find myself exhausted from her schedule. Out every night when often I just wish I could relax and curl up with a book. Traveling to meets which last anywhere from 4 to 5 hours, though all our meets are within driving distance, thank goodness. Well, for now anyway! My daughter's club hosts 3 meets a year in which the parents are required to work, and most meets are 2 to 3 days in a row!

Yes, it's a commitment, but I really think swimming is a great sport for both the body and mind! If your son enjoys it, I say let him stick with it. One thing I do with my daughter to help break the monotony is I do give her time off, particularly after a weekend meet. Instead of doing 4 practices, she will only do 3, for example.

Anyway, talk to your son and see how he feels, and I hope it all works out!
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Old 11-30-2010, 08:04 AM
 
Location: 500 miles from home
27,261 posts, read 15,048,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wsop View Post
My daughter swims but she is only 11 and in 6th grade. Right now she swims 3 to 4 days per week for 1 1/2 hours a day. Soon she will be moving up a level and will need to swim 4 to 5 days a week for 2 hours a day. She also does dry land training which is an additional 1 to 2 hours per week. She also swims year round.

It is a HUGE time commitment for both the kids and parents, as well as a huge financial commitment. It's a rough schedule. Home from school, a little bit of homework, eat dinner, go to practice, come home and finish homework. There really is little time for socializing during the week, but in all honesty the majority of her friends are not around for socializing during the week either. Those that are not involved in anything I find are the ones who do not do as well in school and are often in trouble at school as well.

One thing I noticed with my daughter, if for whatever reason we have a week where she makes less practices, she actually becomes very lazy and less focused on her school work. When she comes home from practicing she is much more focused and completes her homework more quickly.

It is a competitive sport, and it is true that you get out of it what you put into it. The kids who swim less often do fall behind, but the great thing about the sport of swimming is the only one you really need to compete against is yourself and the clock. The kids are taught to know their fastest times and the times needed to achieve championship qualifications, and that is what they focus on. Rather than focusing on what place they come in relative to other kids, they focus on dropping time during meets.

Despite the fact that it is my daughter who does all the swimming, I find myself exhausted from her schedule. Out every night when often I just wish I could relax and curl up with a book. Traveling to meets which last anywhere from 4 to 5 hours, though all our meets are within driving distance, thank goodness. Well, for now anyway! My daughter's club hosts 3 meets a year in which the parents are required to work, and most meets are 2 to 3 days in a row!

Yes, it's a commitment, but I really think swimming is a great sport for both the body and mind! If your son enjoys it, I say let him stick with it. One thing I do with my daughter to help break the monotony is I do give her time off, particularly after a weekend meet. Instead of doing 4 practices, she will only do 3, for example.

Anyway, talk to your son and see how he feels, and I hope it all works out!
I understand exactly how exhausted you are! We just started the year-round swimming 2 years ago when he was 13. Last year, I was very involved on the board of his club team and that took a lot of time as well; though there were many things I enjoyed.
I did have a great carpool though and other great swim Moms to help me. I just now found a new carpool and am so excited!

One good thing about swimming here is that once High School season starts; they are no longer allowed to swim USA Meets. Last year; we would have some big invitational, all day, HS Meet on Saturday; then travel 3 hours away to catch the final day of a USA Meet on Sunday. No more of that here!

So maybe it will all work out after all.

I just think he's tired after a long week-end away. I also think he's not used to the harder, more difficult practices and that is really dragging him down; along with his times. His coach wants him to attend the 3 hour Saturday club practice - then attend his first high school meet. He wants to skip the club practice; and I think I might let him. He has added times to all events since moving here and I think he's just worn out.

Thank you for your insights!
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Old 11-30-2010, 09:13 AM
 
613 posts, read 808,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ringo1 View Post
I understand exactly how exhausted you are! We just started the year-round swimming 2 years ago when he was 13. Last year, I was very involved on the board of his club team and that took a lot of time as well; though there were many things I enjoyed.
I did have a great carpool though and other great swim Moms to help me. I just now found a new carpool and am so excited!

One good thing about swimming here is that once High School season starts; they are no longer allowed to swim USA Meets. Last year; we would have some big invitational, all day, HS Meet on Saturday; then travel 3 hours away to catch the final day of a USA Meet on Sunday. No more of that here!

So maybe it will all work out after all.

I just think he's tired after a long week-end away. I also think he's not used to the harder, more difficult practices and that is really dragging him down; along with his times. His coach wants him to attend the 3 hour Saturday club practice - then attend his first high school meet. He wants to skip the club practice; and I think I might let him. He has added times to all events since moving here and I think he's just worn out.

Thank you for your insights!
I give you a lot of credit for being on the board; it's a huge work load. I know our board seems to change often because the parents can't handle it for more than 2 years because it is so much work.

It's tough when the kids add time to their events but inevitable. From what I understand your son is at the age where it becomes difficult to drop time which can be discouraging. I think a lot of kids give up swimming around that age, but for those that stick with it they eventually start dropping time again.

The upside to swimming as parents is not having to stand outside in the freezing cold watching our kids play soccer or football! During my daughter's meet last weekend all the parents from the soccer field kept coming in to the pool area to warm up!

Anyway, I wish your son luck in his future meets!!
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Old 11-30-2010, 09:36 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
1,390 posts, read 2,317,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ringo1 View Post
My son is a high school swimmer and a club swimmer as well. I'm really struggling with the financial and time aspects of all the practices, meets, traveling, equipment, etc.

Does anyone else think 2 1/2 hours of practice, five days a week; three hours on Saturday; and one 5:30 am extra practice is too much? There are others on the team who do even more.

I worry that he does not have enough time for his schoolwork and seems exhausted all the time.

It seems like a lot to me for a 15 year old kid; who is just trying to fit in; do well in his chosen sport; and most likely will not be awarded any college scholarships.

I know that keeping busy is good; and I don't have anything to compare it with. He seems ok with it; but it's a lot more than we did in our previous state and school. He was a little teary-eyed this evening when he got home at 7:00 with a paper to write; two tests to study for; and a book report due. His social life appears to be non-existant other than his swim team.

Is this normal? Average? Too much? Or just don't worry about it as long as he keeps his grades up and seems (somewhat) happy?

Swim parent here with a 15 year old son who has a very similar schedule. As I read through your post, I wondered if I knew you!

My son does club and HS swimming. Club swimming hours are M-F 3:30-5:30 PM plus Tuesday & Thursday 5:30-7:30 AM, plus Saturdays 8-10 AM. Meets are attended about twice a month (and for the first time, ds is flying out of state to compete this weekend). During high school swim season, ds attends club swimming on Saturdays and only on the days the high school team doesn't practice. He attends USA swim meets during the hs swim season, too, entering as unaffiliated with a swim club.

I follow my son's lead as to what he wants to do, and encourage him to try achieve some balance with sports, academics and social life (which is difficult). This school year he is only taking 6 classes (instead of 7) and dedicating that extra hour to study/homework.

I'm also tired of driving to practice and meets (and have a non-swimming daughter at home with her own activities). It goes with the territory. I remember at one swim meet a parent wore a t-shirt that said something similar to "behind every student athelete is a tired parent". Well said!
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Old 11-30-2010, 10:29 AM
 
Location: 500 miles from home
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I feel like I know you both, Wysop and Twins4lynn! Yes, it IS nice to be in a nice warm (toasty), steam-bath in the dead middle of winter instead of outside! I'm trying to look at the positive.

Good Luck to both of your swimmers this year. We have our first HS meet this week-end and I hope he does well and it sets the tone for the rest of the year. IF he drops time, he will see that all his hard work is paying off. He's worried that, as a sprinter, all this yardage doesn't really help him that much. So, my fingers are crossed that he seems some improvement; even if it's 1/2 second. That would improve his mood so much.

I have a sticker on my car that says 'Swim Mom" but I saw one on another car that said "Swim Taxi" and that was so much more appropriate.

I love hearing from other parents; it makes me feel that we are somewhat normal.
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Old 11-30-2010, 01:14 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
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I have a 14yr old and a a 10yr old swimming.

My 14yr old swims both club and HS, has two practices a day 5 days a week (HS 6 - 8am, and club 5-6:30pm) with the occasional weekend clinic. My 10yr old swims once a day, 6-7:45pm. Grades come first so if my daughter has a ton of homework that she wasn't able to finish in school we let her miss the evening practice.

We carpool with two other parents for the HS practice, which helps out a great deal. I take them in the morning and the other parents do the afternoon run.

Adequate sleep and food are very important. We pretty much have an open door policy on the pantry :-) and they aren't allowed to stay up late during the week.

Since your son is a sprinter his drops in time will likely be in tenths of a second. The yardage they do directly affects cardiovascular fitness which does play a pivotal role for all swim events.

I need to get one of those t-shirts.......
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