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Old 12-22-2010, 10:02 AM
 
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This thread brought back memories! When my oldest daughter was four, Jeff Wiggle (yes, those Wiggles) was her imaginary friend. She made me frame a coloring page of him, and she kept it on her dresser!
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Old 12-22-2010, 10:16 AM
 
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Made me laugh as well. I had imaginary friends that lived in my belly button according to my mom. I sort of remember. She would probably spout off their names if I called and asked her.

So tell me that's not bizarre! And I consider myself perfectly normal. My husband may disagree

I was the youngest of 4, so you would think I'd have had enough playmates to keep me busy and not make people up. But there was a 3 year age difference between me and the next oldest.

My only child never had an imaginary friend. But he did have his stuffed dog Skip that went everywhere. He still has him. It's possible he might sneak him to college.
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Old 12-22-2010, 10:24 AM
 
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My daughter had an imaginary dog (dalmatian to be exact) when she was three. She would hold her arm out like she was walking him everywhere we went. Even opening the door to the car, she's ask me to wait so he could get in. She'd even make sure his tail was clear of the door before I shut it, lol. She slowly outgrew it, but it was cute while it lasted.
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Old 12-22-2010, 10:44 AM
 
Location: In a house
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Heck I'm 49 and I still have imaginary friends.

(This message brought to you by the voices in AnonChick's head.)
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Old 12-22-2010, 10:46 AM
 
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My older son has an imaginary friend named Ghosty. I think it's pretty funny.
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Old 12-22-2010, 10:52 AM
 
Location: BK All Day
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post

(This message brought to you by the voices in AnonChick's head.)
Does she know my plant?
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Old 12-22-2010, 12:52 PM
 
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I've worked (and known) with a lot of very creative people. Most of them report having imaginary friends when they were kids.
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Old 12-22-2010, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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Surely you have watched Sesame Street. Mr. Snuffleupalous originally was Big Bird's imaginery friend. The creators used that huge elephant type creature to address the issue of imaginery friends in young children. Eventually they decided to let everybody see him but I rememberr how frustrated Big Bird was that nobody else saw mr. Snuffleupalous.

Anybody else on here as old as I am and remember that fact?
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Old 12-22-2010, 02:11 PM
 
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Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Surely you have watched Sesame Street. Mr. Snuffleupalous originally was Big Bird's imaginery friend. The creators used that huge elephant type creature to address the issue of imaginery friends in young children. Eventually they decided to let everybody see him but I rememberr how frustrated Big Bird was that nobody else saw mr. Snuffleupalous.

Anybody else on here as old as I am and remember that fact?
Not sure how old you are, but yes, I remember that.
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Old 12-22-2010, 02:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Houston_2010 View Post

Would you consider this to be expected behavior for her age? Should I discourage or encourage the imaginary friendship?
My 5yo & 3yo play SuperWhy on a regular basis (they need to have the exact colors of the characters shirts or there is heck to pay!), along w/ Alvin & the Chipmunks and Max & Ruby. They fight over who is going to be Ruby as both want to be her...they are boys. For some reason when we are in the car, they request to be called Simon & Alvin. I love it.
In nice weather, they are constantly putting on outfits to be Batman, Superman or Indiana Jones & run around outside in capes, hats, and so on.
See not a thing wrong w/ it; at this age it is all about imagination & play.

Soon enough they will grow up & be told how imagination, creativity, and freedom is a sign of being ADHD/ADD/schizophernic/bipolar/maniac depressive/OCD. Enjoy it. It is truly one of the joys of young children.
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