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Old 01-05-2011, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,435 posts, read 41,667,043 times
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I have enjoyed sewing and crafts my entire life. We have some kitchen cloths made from feed sacks which I embroidered when I was about 6 or 7. They are still in good shape.

Sewing now is more for creativity than to save money. Clothes ar so cheap now that by the time you purchas pattern, fabric, notions and factor in time you end up spending way more than if you just purchased something ready made.

I made a boat load of money making doll clothes, knitting scarves and making birthday presents for little girls when I owned a high end doll shop.

I have two sewing machines, serger and 2 embroidery machines and have a beautiful sewing room which unfortunately becomes a big catch all for the excess. And we certainly do have alot of excess. I taught my oldest daughter how to sew as soon as her feet would reach the pedal and my 8 year olds can't wait to start sewing.

What do people do when clothes need mending without sewing skills? Do you just toss it cause you don't have a sewing machine? It costs a fortune to take something for alternations.

my girls are pretty tiny so I still have to take up waistbands for them. And I make shorts out the kazoo for them because I have so much fabric I should open a store.
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Old 01-05-2011, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Denver area
21,142 posts, read 22,127,166 times
Reputation: 35568
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOriginalMrsX View Post
I think its great and a practical skill to learn. I think people are going back to more simpler times when making your own clothes, curtains and crafts was the norm especially after this Recession. Who wants to buy a really good fancy curtain that starts out at $40.00 a panel and up? I bought two once and I swore I would never do that again.

Yes, I'm not sure she's that interested in making clothing at this time but things like curtains, pillows, crafty things and mending.
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Old 01-05-2011, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,004 posts, read 9,671,359 times
Reputation: 19409
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I have enjoyed sewing and crafts my entire life. We have some kitchen cloths made from feed sacks which I embroidered when I was about 6 or 7. They are still in good shape.

Sewing now is more for creativity than to save money. Clothes ar so cheap now that by the time you purchas pattern, fabric, notions and factor in time you end up spending way more than if you just purchased something ready made.

I made a boat load of money making doll clothes, knitting scarves and making birthday presents for little girls when I owned a high end doll shop.

I have two sewing machines, serger and 2 embroidery machines and have a beautiful sewing room which unfortunately becomes a big catch all for the excess. And we certainly do have alot of excess. I taught my oldest daughter how to sew as soon as her feet would reach the pedal and my 8 year olds can't wait to start sewing.

What do people do when clothes need mending without sewing skills? Do you just toss it cause you don't have a sewing machine? It costs a fortune to take something for alternations.

my girls are pretty tiny so I still have to take up waistbands for them. And I make shorts out the kazoo for them because I have so much fabric I should open a store.
Yes, I was wondering the same thing...about mending and alterations. Oh my gosh, having 4 kids, (3 of them boys), my kids would have been (would be) naked! I would go broke buying them new clothes constantly, if I didn't have my machine and know how to sew! Not only that, but curtains and valances alone, would be prohibitive for my home without a sewing machine. I have 30 windows! I can't imagine having to purchase window coverings for them all. Many times, I have purchased panels on sale, cut them down and made valances out of some of them. The nice part about being able to sew, is that you can truly customize a room. It can be a real bear, finding the exact right accessories and/or curtains. Being able to sew them yourself, expands your options like crazy!
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Old 01-05-2011, 11:41 AM
 
3,647 posts, read 9,315,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmel View Post
Yes, I was wondering the same thing...about mending and alterations. Oh my gosh, having 4 kids, (3 of them boys), my kids would have been (would be) naked! I would go broke buying them new clothes constantly, if I didn't have my machine and know how to sew! Not only that, but curtains and valances alone, would be prohibitive for my home without a sewing machine. I have 30 windows! I can't imagine having to purchase window coverings for them all. Many times, I have purchased panels on sale, cut them down and made valances out of some of them. The nice part about being able to sew, is that you can truly customize a room. It can be a real bear, finding the exact right accessories and/or curtains. Being able to sew them yourself, expands your options like crazy!
As a military family (and also in the years after we got out), we moved a lot. I love putting up curtains in each new house we rented - it made it feel like "home" a lot quicker. I can't imagine if I'd had to buy panels every time, to fit each odd sized window. It was so much easier to buy material or what was on sale in a larger size than I needed, and then to hem it. That way I could redo it in the next home. I made my daughter's curtains to match a quilt my bf made her and bought extra material and those hung in 4 of our homes before they "retired".

My FIL used to bring his shirts to me when he split a seam when they came to visit twice a year. His wife does a lot of different things, but sewing isn't one of them.

We also have had pets. Animals (such as puppies) like to jump on children and cause holes in their jackets. It's been nice to be able to put a cute patch/American flag on it and then they can still wear it - same with jeans.

I once found my favorite brand/type of jeans on clearance and bought 5 pairs - for $15 each, rather than the regular $40, so I'd have 'spares'. Unfortunately, it turned out the zippers were weak in that batch (hence the clearance) and they couldn't be returned. $15 worth of zippers later, and I was able to keep them all - still have 4 of them, matter of fact!

I recycled old jeans into aprons for gifts for my daughter and her friends this Christmas. HUGE money saver! I also made them for all the ladies in our family. Lots of praise and I made 8 aprons for less than $10 (I used a lot of spare fabric from my 'stash' though too - I can't count the cost of that. Some of it I was given, a lot of it I don't remember buying)

I got my 8 year old a sewing basket for Christmas, and she's practicing hand sewing, but she's already begging for a sewing machine of her own for her next birthday!
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Old 01-06-2011, 10:40 AM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
51,310 posts, read 50,576,723 times
Reputation: 60237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattie View Post
My mother never made me sew, in fact I flunked that portion of Home Ec. But, I had to iron my father's handkerchiefs every week. Once I mastered that she added pillow cases to the mix. Now, I never iron. My DH and my sons do a better job of it than I care to.
HA, I did the same--ironed Dad's handkerchiefs and pillowcases (who the hell irons pillowcases in THIS day and age???)

I did learn to sew, though--made my first garment when I was 11. It was a calico peasant-type maxi skirt with a ruffle and a matching sash. They were in style and I wanted one so badly, but I was already taller than average and there was nowhere for me to buy one long enough. I continued and made most of my dresses and skirts throughout my teenage years. By the time I got "Home Ec" I was already beyond the simple sewing projects they were teaching.
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Old 01-06-2011, 10:49 AM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,351,992 times
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Please raise you hand if you can remember you mother standing with the other moms talking about the new iron on patches. Oh my goodness, you didn't have to sew them on. You could iron them on. And they were blue jean material and you could buy them pre-cut and in a package at Newberry's!

Glory be and saints be praised!
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Old 01-06-2011, 11:26 AM
 
1,219 posts, read 3,745,943 times
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I wasn't alive in the 60's, but they should really bring back those Home-Ec classes. There is a generation of kids now who can't sew on a button or boil water on a stove. I taught my son (and am teaching the others) basic home tasks, but he knows kids at college who can't even do laundry!
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Old 01-06-2011, 12:53 PM
 
12,922 posts, read 19,809,103 times
Reputation: 33954
Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
Please raise you hand if you can remember you mother standing with the other moms talking about the new iron on patches. Oh my goodness, you didn't have to sew them on. You could iron them on. And they were blue jean material and you could buy them pre-cut and in a package at Newberry's!

Glory be and saints be praised!
Hands high here! And, I even remember Newberry's! My mother used to iron those patches on the inside of the knees before they even ripped. She claimed they lasted twice as long that way, and she was probably right.
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Old 01-06-2011, 02:55 PM
 
15,299 posts, read 16,854,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wanderintonc View Post
I wasn't alive in the 60's, but they should really bring back those Home-Ec classes. There is a generation of kids now who can't sew on a button or boil water on a stove. I taught my son (and am teaching the others) basic home tasks, but he knows kids at college who can't even do laundry!
Teaching them at home is a good idea. But, to be honest, how many people actually cook anymore. So many people microwave even for family dinners. And, very few people sew anything either. Ready made stuff is cheaper now than buying fabric and sewing.
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Old 01-06-2011, 03:22 PM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,351,992 times
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Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
But, to be honest, how many people actually cook anymore. So many people microwave even for family dinners.
I cook. From scratch. Just the smell of most microwave food makes me nauseus and it cannot be good for you. I'm getting asked by more and more 20-40 -year olds for recipes. And even simple cooking instructions.
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