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Old 12-30-2010, 07:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Yes, there certainly were washing machines in the 1960's, lol. We had a normal one, but I can remember my grandmother still using her old wringer.
Yeah, I had a boyfriend whose mother still used an old wringer in the early 1980s.

People who hold on to old ways of doing things don't strike me as the type of people to buy the latest baby gadgets.
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Old 12-30-2010, 07:44 AM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imcurious View Post
You are sadly correct. I remember only putting babies in carriers or swings or playpens . . . no holding the way people do these days. I cannot tell you why. It was unconscious "just the way it was done." It was like these new inventions were thought to be superior to the old fashioned human body.
Judging by my own family and what some of the other posters are saying, this was absolutely NOT true universally. However, your post made me think of something.

When my daughter (born in 1991) was a baby, a friend of mine kept telling me I held her too much and that I was going to spoil her by doing so. That annoyed me no end, as I was by necessity a working mom and wanted to be with my baby as much as possible, including holding her. I would ignore her and she would say this again, claiming that it's something her mother always told her (note that said mother was an alcoholic who was dead at 55 of cirrhosis.)

Perhaps this thinking was widespread among certain people? It was not the way I grew up, but this woman was always sticking her own kid into some kind of contraption. Meanwhile, her son ruled the house with his little temper and had his parents jumping when he told them to jump, which is what I would call spoiled.
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Old 12-30-2010, 07:47 AM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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As far as gadgets go, my father was disabled, and so there was an extra old wheelchair in the basement that we got to play with. We'd make a "Fun House", with wet things hanging from the basement clothes line and other siblings reaching out to grab, etc., and run one another in the old wheelchair through the maze we made.

Didn't need no stinkin' busy seat.
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Old 12-30-2010, 07:50 AM
 
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My sister sticks her youngest child into all sorts of contraptions.

When he starts fussing, she moves him to another contraption.

He goes from the high chair to the bouncy chair to the walker to thes swing.

She just moves him from place to place. It's quite interesting to watch when visiting.

BUT she does hold him, snuggle with him, and carry him around too.
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Old 12-30-2010, 07:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
Yeah, I had a boyfriend whose mother still used an old wringer in the early 1980s.

People who hold on to old ways of doing things don't strike me as the type of people to buy the latest baby gadgets.
I don't know if you missed my post, but the things we had in our house in the 60's have been around for eons, and I wouldn't consider them "latest baby gadgets".
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Old 12-30-2010, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
We didn't go clam digging in So Cal. We went grunion running. Wait for a full moon when the grunion were laying their eggs in the sand and dig them out with our hands. (State law. You couldn't use a tool.)

Nobody ever ate the silly things. They were too full of tar from the oil in the sand. But my parents' roses were the pride of the neighborhood.

Oh how cool!! The greatest thing for me would have been the full moon near the water... it's the most magical time for me. I don't know what it is, but clear night+full moon+water (lake or ocean), does something strange to me, it's the most breathtaking, magical feeling. Yeah...LOL....silly!
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Old 12-30-2010, 07:58 AM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
A playpen and a crib and a pram weren't gadgets. Prams have been around in England since the mid 1700's. They weren't modern.

Washing machines like we know them today weren't common in Australia in the early/mid 60's. Post WW2, appliances like those were expensive and not many people had them yet in every home, like they may have started to do in 50's America. And if they did have them, it was the type that had a wringer on the top, that you fed the clothes through manually to wring out the water, before hanging them on the clothesline.

A dishwasher? You've got to be joking!
We didn't have a dishwasher growing up. Not because they weren't available, but because my parents had seven kids. We WERE the dishwashers. There was a calendar on the wall and your name was on it indicating whether you were washing the dishes or drying them that day.
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Old 12-30-2010, 08:08 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
We didn't have a dishwasher growing up. Not because they weren't available, but because my parents had seven kids. We WERE the dishwashers. There was a calendar on the wall and your name was on it indicating whether you were washing the dishes or drying them that day.
That's not unique to houses without dishwashers. We had a dishwasher, but we still had the nightly dishwashing chore.

Just because there was a dishwasher didn't mean that the kids got off the hook from doing the dishes.

We had a joke in our famiy that our mother had so many kids so she wouldn't need to hire a maid.
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Old 12-30-2010, 08:15 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
Washing machines like we know them today weren't common in Australia in the early/mid 60's. Post WW2, appliances like those were expensive and not many people had them yet in every home, like they may have started to do in 50's America. And if they did have them, it was the type that had a wringer on the top, that you fed the clothes through manually to wring out the water, before hanging them on the clothesline.
In the US, washing machines were normal style washing machines in the suburbs. I swear. And they weren't just starting in the 50s. Our best dryer was from the 50s. It lasted forever. It was so sad to see it die. Nothing dried clothes like that old dryer. It's true that they don't make things like they used to!

Almost every single suburban home had these conveniences in the 60s. And even people who lived in old houses had them. There were just some die hard old people who never gave up theirs. Houses in the country probably still used the old stuff. But the suburbs were all modern!

I didn't realize you grew up in Australia. That's the difference. Americans are known for having the biggest and the best at any cost. Expensive wasn't in the American vocabularly back in the 50s and 60s. Those people spent serious money on anything new. It was the keeping up with the Jones era. Post war make babies and spend money!
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Old 12-30-2010, 08:23 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 88,940,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
I don't know if you missed my post, but the things we had in our house in the 60's have been around for eons, and I wouldn't consider them "latest baby gadgets".
I just saw that. I assumed you werein gadgets because you said you were always being put in something. My mother only used a high chair and bassinet, which was later replaced by the crib. That's it. And she wasn't putting us in them all the time. Since I have a little sister, I saw how my mother raised babies. But I think being an only chid is the relevant factor in your story. Many only children remember being lonely when they were little---even today's only children.
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