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Old 12-30-2010, 08:29 AM
 
9,056 posts, read 6,723,723 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
In the US, washing machines were normal style washing machines in the suburbs. I swear. And they weren't just starting in the 50s. Our best dryer was from the 50s. It lasted forever. It was so sad to see it die. Nothing dried clothes like that old dryer. It's true that they don't make things like they used to!

Almost every single suburban home had these conveniences in the 60s. And even people who lived in old houses had them. There were just some die hard old people who never gave up theirs. Houses in the country probably still used the old stuff. But the suburbs were all modern!

I didn't realize you grew up in Australia. That's the difference. Americans are known for having the biggest and the best at any cost. Expensive wasn't in the American vocabularly back in the 50s and 60s. Those people spent serious money on anything new. It was the keeping up with the Jones era. Post war make babies and spend money!
Yes, I think the post war thing was the difference. Both Australia and England's economies were decimated by WW2, as were our male populations. I think credit was becoming increasingly available in the US too, so people could by all these new fangled appliances whether they could afford them or not.

It's not that way over there now, but back then there was a definite time lag between when new things were available in the US and then available in Australia.

But the equipment people used to stick babies in in those days (and a couple of centuries prior to that) were alive and well. I really think it was a mentality of not coddling too much, not having the luxury of time to spend with them, formula feeding becoming the vogue and all that. I think people really did think if you picked a child up or payed them too much attention you'd spoil them. Of course everybody's mother wasn't like that but I think it was more the norm in the 60's than it is now.

And to add to that, I have absolutely no recollection of my grandfather's face whatsoever, because I think men had as little to do with babies as possible in those days.
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Old 12-30-2010, 08:48 AM
 
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First off Finster, had you lived near us you'ld have had plenty of company. My parents took in strays. If there was a kid in the neighborhood who had a dad who didn't care or a single mom who had to work long hours, their feet were under our table. I don't remember ever being lonely. If anything I wanted all those kids to go home so I could have some peace and quiet.

But now I look back and think, "How blessed was I?" I won the lottery on parents.

Now "modern conveniences" (for the times). Washer but no dryer. No dishwasher. Didn't get a color TV until the mid-70s. We did have a first-rate Hi-fi. (Record player for you young'uns.) I look back and realise all the "extra" money went into taking us places. (And very often the strays came along.) Both my parents had horrible cases of wanderlust. One of their favorite stories was heating my bottle under the hood of the car on long car trips. We went cross-country (and back) by car before I was five. This in the days before a McDonalds on every counter and stop-n-go gas stations with rest rooms. I've peed behind a lot of bushes.
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Old 12-30-2010, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,960 posts, read 98,795,031 times
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This thread brings up a conversation my husband and I had a week ago or so. We were looking for a Christmas card for his mother, age 91, who likes the sappy ones. Since we procrastinated, there weren't a lot left, and we ended up with one that said "to a fun mom". I asked him if his mother was "fun". He said, "No, she stayed home and scrubbed the floors and such and let us kids roam the 'hood". (He has a brother five years older.) I said that when my bro and I were little kids, our mom did play with us, built snowmen, took us on little walks to the river b/c we were fascinated by it and she was afraid we'd just up and hop in by ourselves, etc. As we got older, we were left more to our own devices. And the house was always clean (despite being 'upstreet' from a steel mill), dinner was always home-made.
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Old 12-30-2010, 09:04 AM
 
47,576 posts, read 58,699,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I am a baby of the 1960s and my mother recently put all of our old home movies on a DVD. I had not seen most of them in many, many years. As I was watching them recently with my children, it struck me as odd how parents rarely seemed to hold or carry their babies. It seemed like the babies (me, my sisters, cousins....) were always strapped into some sort of a seating device like a stroller, busy seat, high chair... or maybe "loose", but in a play pen. I seldom saw a mom or dad just holding their baby and certainly didn't see anyone with their baby strapped to their body.

Any comments?
Actually I find the reverse to be more true. I think people back then actually held and carried babies but today you see people carrying their babies in plastic seats and rarely actually touching the baby.
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Old 12-30-2010, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,004 posts, read 9,653,945 times
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We had a washer and dryer, but my mother still believed in the clothes line! No dishwasher, microwave....2 channels on TV until the mid 70s, but the television was ONLY on in the evenings. You didn't waste time (only lazy people watched daytime tv)...sitting in front of the "boob tube"...there was work to be done! LOL Perhaps the reason we didn't have a lot of child "gadgets" was that there was no room. There were a lot of kids, and "needful" things that the room was needed for. We sat on pillows or books if we needed to be higher at the table.

We didn't have a lot of toys, we used our imaginations and trees were my favorite things! You could do so many things with trees! You could climb them and tie things from them...the small ones you could climb up and they'd bend over and lower you to the ground. You could use the branches of large ones to slide to the ground! Plastic play pools? Nah....didn't have one. A huge hole dug in the ground, lined with plastic sheeting and filled with water was MUCH better!

I have tried to raise my children very much like I was raised in that respect. I never really bought into "gadgets", unless they were required, in order to be legal. As for playpens, the best playpen I ever had for my kids was one of those expandable wooden rings. Holy cow.... If I needed to keep the little ones corralled, they STILL had tons of room for their toys and to move around. I took that bugger EVERYWHERE! I told one of my "older" friends about that, when my grandson was born. Bless her heart, she was shopping at a second hand store, found one of those play yards, and bought it for me! LOL For me, those are way better than playpens any day. I even used mine around the Christmas tree several years when I had wee ones in the house. LOL
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Old 12-30-2010, 09:11 AM
 
47,576 posts, read 58,699,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucygirl951 View Post
I was born in the late 60s, and my mom didn't work outside the home. She kept a clean house, cooked dinner every night, had a garden and beautiful flower beds, and she cooked everything from scratch. I have to say though that she paid a lot of attention to us kids. We were always at the kitchen table drawing or playing with our toys while she was cooking, and she talked to us the whole time. We had a washing machine and dryer, and the utility room was right off of the kitchen. Summer mornings, we'd walk in the nearby woods and fill our buckets with raspberries, and then we'd all go home and spend the afternoon making jam together. But she didn't do anything by herself, just for her, and she still doesn't.
Yes - more mothers stayed home with their kids in those days. It's more common today for kids to be left for hours in car seats and pens in day care centers, never allowed free play. Also my mother would have never used a walker for a baby but you see many people using those so they don't have to hold or watch a baby.
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Old 12-30-2010, 09:15 AM
 
9,056 posts, read 6,723,723 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
First off Finster, had you lived near us you'ld have had plenty of company. My parents took in strays. If there was a kid in the neighborhood who had a dad who didn't care or a single mom who had to work long hours, their feet were under our table. I don't remember ever being lonely. If anything I wanted all those kids to go home so I could have some peace and quiet.

But now I look back and think, "How blessed was I?" I won the lottery on parents.

Now "modern conveniences" (for the times). Washer but no dryer. No dishwasher. Didn't get a color TV until the mid-70s. We did have a first-rate Hi-fi. (Record player for you young'uns.) I look back and realise all the "extra" money went into taking us places. (And very often the strays came along.) Both my parents had horrible cases of wanderlust. One of their favorite stories was heating my bottle under the hood of the car on long car trips. We went cross-country (and back) by car before I was five. This in the days before a McDonalds on every counter and stop-n-go gas stations with rest rooms. I've peed behind a lot of bushes.
Aww, that's sweet DewDrop, and I'm sure I would have loved hanging out at your house. Although, I don't want to give the impression that it was all bad, but it wasn't great either - so I'm afraid I can't wax nostalgic about it like you guys can.

I know almost everybody looks back on their childhood with pleasant affection, but personally I prefer the more personal approach to parenting and freedom from a lot of the drudgery my family had to endure back then.

Your parents sound great too, DDI, and I think that makes the difference for you and others who have such fond memories.

Peeing behind bushes is a great skill to have learned. And people will probably start throwing rotten pineapples at me if I dare mention that we didn't have inside toilets when I was a small child either.
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Old 12-30-2010, 09:23 AM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,325,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
And people will probably start throwing rotten pineapples at me if I dare mention that we didn't have inside toilets when I was a small child either.
Here's how my parents chose the house I grew up in.

1) It had an inside john. My dad never saw one that flushed until he joined the Army in WWII. (My gma in CHICAGO didn't have an indoor john until about 1960 when my dad built one for her while we were on vacation there.)

2) It had a gas heater. Meaning nobody had to haul buckets of coal. Apparently my mom took one look at the knob that said "on" and decided she'd reached nirvana. (Though my dad was always saying you can't turn the heat on until there's snow on Baldy! He lost that one lol.)
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Old 12-30-2010, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,004 posts, read 9,653,945 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
Aww, that's sweet DewDrop, and I'm sure I would have loved hanging out at your house. Although, I don't want to give the impression that it was all bad, but it wasn't great either - so I'm afraid I can't wax nostalgic about it like you guys can.

I know almost everybody looks back on their childhood with pleasant affection, but personally I prefer the more personal approach to parenting and freedom from a lot of the drudgery my family had to endure back then.

Your parents sound great too, DDI, and I think that makes the difference for you and others who have such fond memories.

Peeing behind bushes is a great skill to have learned. And people will probably start throwing rotten pineapples at me if I dare mention that we didn't have inside toilets when I was a small child either.
LOL....My parents bought a piece of property at "the beach" when I was around 4. My father started taking trips with the older brothers to start construction of a house on it. Late in the spring, our family moved. There was an old Sunday School bus on the property and we lived in a huge old army tent, a pop up trailer and cooked and ate in the bus...and yes, there was an outhouse on the property for such purposes! LOL Funny thing is, we lived that way, taking sponge baths and washing our hair using pitchers of heated water, until late fall.

I don't remember it being a bad thing....it was fun! I'm quite sure that my mother did NOT feel the same way! I do remember everyone having to pitch in to finish the house so we could move in before winter. My parents still had to work for a living, so everyone had to help with chores and do what they could. Again, I don't remember that being a bad thing, as a child. It was fun, busy, educational and gave my entire family an appreciation for the comforts of life, once the house was finished. I do remember though, my brother (who was only a little older than I) having so much time on our own, left to explore and play in the woods. I don't remember ever getting into trouble or doing mischievous things at that time....life was an adventure! Now, had I been one of the older children, I may not have felt the same way! LOL
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Old 12-30-2010, 09:30 AM
 
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Does anyone remember chicken pox parties? Or eating mudpies?

I really believe that children's immune systems were exposed to a broader spectrum of pathogens in those days. We rarely got sick unless it was one of the childhood diseases that children are vaccinated against today. We had it all: measles (both kinds), mumps, chicken pox. I remember intentionally exposing my little sister to chicken pox when she was about 4 because I figured it was better to go ahead and get it over with. I was so wise at the age of six!

I don't remember anyone having the allergies that seem to be so common these days, and I wonder if it wasn't all those mudpies that we ate!
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