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Old 12-30-2010, 06:54 PM
 
Location: 500 miles from home
27,331 posts, read 15,077,511 times
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Another thing to think about with kids - is that so many 'after school' activities take place either right AT quitting time or before. If you live close to home/school - you can sometimes sneak out of the office to ferry your kid (and others) to and from their designated events. Hopefully, you can actually get to see and participate in some of those events as well.

I can't imagine commuting 40 minutes one way. I would have missed so much.
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Old 12-30-2010, 06:57 PM
 
5,703 posts, read 15,510,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss On The Move View Post
fallingwater, you know exactly what I mean! Yes, I also come from a blue collar family, and as you said there's nothing wrong with blue collar WORK..but there is something wrong with a blue collar MENTALITY; yes, of course Southfield, Redford, Warren, Dearborn, Oak Park, Ferndale, Harper Woods...have all went down and why? Their proximity to the inner city of Detroit Wow, I keep seeing that Dearborn Heights is getting iffy....they are probably having the issue that Southfield is.

We can probably afford more, but are grounded that we won't spend over $150k... there's just TOO many deals from $80k to $150k (stuff that used to be $150k to $300k) for us to overextend ourselves. We currently pay $925/mth in rent plus electric and gas..so we're trying to stay at no more than $1100/mth for mortgage/tax/insurance.

Plymouth and Beverly Hills have inventory in our price range...while it's not as much inventory, there is a bit here and there. I honestly think this is where we will end up. If you know anything about Berkley let me know please thanks again!
I grew up south of Detroit. The downriver area. I always liked the areas you are looking at. We just never could afford it because at that time you couldn't touch a home under 200k, add the high taxes in MI and it was at least 2500 a month in a mortgage. Way out of our league at that time. Even the nicer cities in downriver have sky high taxes. I have family in Trenton, Riverview and so forth. The one relative pays 6k a year in taxes. Plymouth Township has lower taxes vs within the city limits. I agree Charter schools are a gamble. The ones in the area I lived mostly housed kids that were expelled from other districts. Lots of riff raff. Charter schools get a bad name for this reason.

Ahh the mentality...When my son was in 4th grade he started to struggle some. It was more social than him not understanding the material. His teacher took me aside and said that I shouldn't worry because the high school has a wonderful mechanic shop program. I gave her a look and she said, "well he might be able to go to college someday." She didn't sound convincing. I thought wow, this teacher is counting my kid out already. But so many in that area are focused on getting a job with Ford's someday. Even in these times the mind set is still there. Again nothing wrong with working with your hands but my husband even says that he is a dying breed.

Don't know much about Berkley except it is a very nice place to live. Just watch the taxes and ask about Homestead. In years past realtors were not completely honest about homestead. If you buy a house from someone that has lived in the home for more than 10 yrs, the taxes showing on the listing sheet will not be what you pay. The taxes go up drastically. On the Michigan.gov website will give you a more accurate estimate of what you will pay. Out of all the cities you listed, I am not impressed with Dearborn Hts or Canton. Everything else is very good. I agree, no fun being house poor. Lots of deals out there. I am just astonished at how much the houses have come down since we left. Bloomfield, Berkely, Beverly Hills, Plymouth, Northville,...all very nice communities with good schools. In fact, not too long ago U.S. World released a report on the best public schools in the country. A school in Bloomfield made the number one spot.

The downside of moving someplace that is highly educated is that you will deal with snobs. I experience this where I live. So I am proud of my blue collar down to earth roots. The snobs get on my nerves but the educational opportunities my child has are amazing.
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Old 12-30-2010, 07:01 PM
 
43,012 posts, read 89,076,504 times
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There is a middle ground between working class and upper class.

It's called middle class and upper middle class.

There are neighborhoods with a blend of middle class/upper middle class where there aren't working class mentalities or upper class snobs.

Just remember, working class and middle class are not the same thing.
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Old 12-30-2010, 08:18 PM
 
33 posts, read 70,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
There is a middle ground between working class and upper class.

It's called middle class and upper middle class.

There are neighborhoods with a blend of middle class/upper middle class where there aren't working class mentalities or upper class snobs.

Just remember, working class and middle class are not the same thing.
Right...working class/middle class do get interchanged a lot. And it's incorrect; I won't go into the details of their differences, but yes, I want to be more in an upper middle class neighborhood vs. working class. Ahhhh...sigh...the world we live in... I don't want the "working class" coming to my street and the upper class probably don't want me coming to theirs! I'll move to Canada...lol.. everyone has given great insight, especially sad dad, hopes and fallingwater.
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Old 12-30-2010, 08:21 PM
 
33 posts, read 70,271 times
Reputation: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ringo1 View Post
Another thing to think about with kids - is that so many 'after school' activities take place either right AT quitting time or before. If you live close to home/school - you can sometimes sneak out of the office to ferry your kid (and others) to and from their designated events. Hopefully, you can actually get to see and participate in some of those events as well.

I can't imagine commuting 40 minutes one way. I would have missed so much.
That is COMPLETELY on point and correct. I get off at 5 now, and struggle to get him to his things by 5:30 etc. We are going to focus on something closer, while we have this great opportunity to buy.

I don't know what state you're in, but here in the Detroit area of Michigan, mostly all middle class and up that have kids have moved about 30 miles outside of Detroit and have 40+ minute drives...that's the norm around these parks...and I want no part of it
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Old 12-30-2010, 09:49 PM
 
2,920 posts, read 2,911,732 times
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A couple of other posters mentioned my primary concern. How far away are you if there is an emergency? How quickly could you get home or to a child's school?

Our kids are grown now, but I can't count the number of times that they had to be picked up early without any advance notice. It helped having three grandparents in the area, one retired, but many people don't have extended families to help.
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Old 12-30-2010, 10:30 PM
 
27,995 posts, read 19,677,561 times
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Personally, I wouldn't do it and I really, really would discourage my husband from commuting such a long distance.

I've had the great pay jobs where the hours were really, really bad for our family. It just wasn't worth it for us. Who cares if you are making good money when you can't even see your family?
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Old 12-30-2010, 10:32 PM
 
27,995 posts, read 19,677,561 times
Reputation: 16471
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
There is a middle ground between working class and upper class.

It's called middle class and upper middle class.

There are neighborhoods with a blend of middle class/upper middle class where there aren't working class mentalities or upper class snobs.

Just remember, working class and middle class are not the same thing.
What about us?

I'd say we are working class with a middle-upper class mentality.
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Old 12-30-2010, 11:10 PM
 
43,012 posts, read 89,076,504 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magritte25 View Post
What about us?

I'd say we are working class with a middle-upper class mentality.
There are different definitions for 'working class' and I have no idea which definition you are using to define yourself. It's not uncommon for middle-upper class people to consider themselves working class based on their upbringing or their type of job even if they are educated and earn more than the lower class. Alternately, it's not uncommon for working class people to have middle-upper class mentality based on their upbringing and other factors too. That's often why people confuse and interchange the terminology 'working class' and 'middle class.' How you define yourself is your business. But I can't accurately answer your question without you providing much more detailed information.
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Old 12-30-2010, 11:13 PM
 
27,995 posts, read 19,677,561 times
Reputation: 16471
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
There are different definitions for 'working class' and I have no idea which definition you are using to define yourself. It's not uncommon for middle-upper class people to consider themselves working class based on their upbringing or their type of job even if they are educated and earn more than the lower class. Alternately, it's not uncommon for working class people to have middle-upper class mentality based on their upbringing and other factors too. That's often why people confuse and interchange the terminology 'working class' and 'middle class.' How you define yourself is your business. But I can't accurately answer your question without you providing much more detailed information.
LOL I think I was being a bit facetious there. Honestly though, we are definitely on the lower end of working class, at least in our area. We don't even break $30K right now. However, we place high value on education and culture. We are also very liberal minded, socially and politically.
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