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Old 01-06-2011, 09:31 AM
 
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Oops missed that Finster already mentioned Lauren Hutton. LOL
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Old 01-06-2011, 09:39 AM
 
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I would. I was horribly sensitive about my smile before I had braces. Both of my sons wore braces too.

I tend to dip in the shallower end of the pool around these here parts anyway, but I love a beautiful smile.
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Old 01-06-2011, 09:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
After reading the American Doll thread, where much ado was made regarding the gap in the doll's front teeth, I was wondering how many parents would get this "fixed" if their child had one.

I have one, and my mother had one, so it's quite likely my dd will have one too. I never thought it was a flaw, as such, but I'm wondering if it will be considered one these days, and whether we should consider it on the same level as other cosmetic issues fixed by braces. It's unlikely dd will need braces for any other issues, so this would be the only reason to go the orthodontic route. Do you think it's worth it?

Just for reference, I'm talking about a Madonna/Anna Paquin/Lauren Hutton size gap - not something that's likely to make her feel socially unacceptable.
I don't think it is something that can be decided or forecasted prior to her growing up & going through life.
Some teenagers and/or young children truly do agonize & find themselves feeling awful about themselves due to physical characteristics that are different than their peers.
As parents, I think & I hope at least when mine start to become more aware of their physical characteristics, that we show both empathy & maturity if our children have noticeable gaps, big ears, small boobs, big boobs and so on.
It is a slippery slope that needs to be handled both firmly & gently as there truly is a recognized diagnosis called body dysmorpic image that many children deal with on a regular basis.
There is a big difference b/w girls who want hair like Kim Kardashian (thousands of dollars worth of extensions) & girls who hide their face w/ their hair for yrs b/c they are mentally humiliated of a flaw on their face.

Luckily, you got lots of time to help her embrace who she is & she will bounce off the roadbumps of life just fine!
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Old 01-06-2011, 09:41 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmel View Post
When your daughter gets older, if she's horribly unhappy, and you can afford them, they can fix that gap with braces.

I'm with you Finster, about the "denture" look you see everywhere these days. My hat goes off to all of the actors who've never fallen for that processed perfection look. Sometimes those imperfections are what make a person look unique/exotic/beautiful. Get those teeth fixed and they pretty much look like everyone else. Look at Ann Heigel (sp?). I'm blown away at some of the actors/actresses who have had their teeth laminated or capped. For some of them, it looks so wrong! It can change so many things about them. Oh sure, you've got this bright white, glowing smile.....but for some, it changes the way they talk. It's like it builds up the front teeth so much that they're almost (bucked)!

As for the gap being hereditary......it's funny how it works! Neither my hubby or I have a gap in our teeth. We were blessed with straight teeth. However, most of he people in his family have the "gap". Only my oldest son has a gap between his teeth. All of the others have perfectly straight teeth sans the gap! By the way, we never got the gap fixed, as he didn't have a problem with it. If it would have been a huge issue, we certainly would have had it fixed.

So true! Remember the actress from Dirty Dancing (Jennifer Grey??) she was very beautiful even with her big nose, well she got that nose job and it completely changed her face. She didn't look like herself anymore and I'm pretty sure I remember an interview where she said that she was unable to find acting work after having done it despite having been the star in such a major film, casting directors didn't recognize her anymore.

I also thing Ashlee Simpson messed up her face when she got her nose done, she had such a unique and beautiful look then she got her mose done and now she's still beautiful but she's "just another white girl" nothing unique at all.
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Old 01-06-2011, 09:51 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
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My daughter has a gap which she opted have closed, as a teenager, with whatever bonding stuff the dentist used. Over time it discolored a bit, so she had it removed. Now she's happily gapped again, and as an adult it's hardly noticable.
I say, do whatever makes you feel better, and find out if it's reversible if you change your mind.
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Old 01-06-2011, 09:53 AM
 
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Funny that you mention Jennifer Gray. My SIL has a large nose, and she said that as a teen, she was always inspired by Gray, who she thought was a good example of how a larger nose could be pretty. SIL was very disappointed by Gray's face change, and I didn't recognize her. It was weird to hear that distinct voice come from a completely different face.

Different features are not flaws. I like people who look like real people. Ever notice that British actors are more natural looking than American actors? Perhaps that's why I'm so drawn to the Brits.
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Old 01-06-2011, 09:53 AM
 
Location: somewhere
4,264 posts, read 7,937,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmel View Post
When your daughter gets older, if she's horribly unhappy, and you can afford them, they can fix that gap with braces.

I'm with you Finster, about the "denture" look you see everywhere these days. My hat goes off to all of the actors who've never fallen for that processed perfection look. Sometimes those imperfections are what make a person look unique/exotic/beautiful. Get those teeth fixed and they pretty much look like everyone else. Look at Ann Heigel (sp?). I'm blown away at some of the actors/actresses who have had their teeth laminated or capped. For some of them, it looks so wrong! It can change so many things about them. Oh sure, you've got this bright white, glowing smile.....but for some, it changes the way they talk. It's like it builds up the front teeth so much that they're almost (bucked)!

As for the gap being hereditary......it's funny how it works! Neither my hubby or I have a gap in our teeth. We were blessed with straight teeth. However, most of he people in his family have the "gap". Only my oldest son has a gap between his teeth. All of the others have perfectly straight teeth sans the gap! By the way, we never got the gap fixed, as he didn't have a problem with it. If it would have been a huge issue, we certainly would have had it fixed.
It is interesting you would bring up actors who have not had their imperfections fixed. I was just remarking to my husband this weekend about several actors who have crooked bottom teeth, with all the money they have, they have never had them fixed.

I am in agreement with most others, if it gets to where it bothers a child and you have the money to have it fixed then by all means, I would probably try the whole "it makes you, you" routine first though.

When I was growing up, braces were for the very rich kids and noone had braces in elementary, they were not considered the norm like they are now. IMO our society places way to much emphasis on looks.
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Old 01-06-2011, 10:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajzjmsmom View Post
It is interesting you would bring up actors who have not had their imperfections fixed. I was just remarking to my husband this weekend about several actors who have crooked bottom teeth, with all the money they have, they have never had them fixed.

I am in agreement with most others, if it gets to where it bothers a child and you have the money to have it fixed then by all means, I would probably try the whole "it makes you, you" routine first though.

When I was growing up, braces were for the very rich kids and noone had braces in elementary, they were not considered the norm like they are now. IMO our society places way to much emphasis on looks.
Yeah, that's pretty much my mindset, and as I said I was a little bemused by her grandmother's immediate comment that we can "get that fixed". I never considered it something that needed fixing, but I'm an Aussie, and we don't have the obsession with "perfect" teeth that I think Americans do.
(no offense, it's just something I've noticed that's different - not meant to imply that Aussies have terrible teeth either - just more natural looking, in general.)

Talking of celebs, I think Jewel would not look as striking as she does without her crooked tooth. I would be glad if I were her that my parents never got that fixed.
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Old 01-06-2011, 10:08 AM
 
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For what it's worth, I had a gap when I was a child that was fixed instantly with a small surgical procedure. As I recall, that ligament on the gums that runs above my front teeth was the cause of the gap. It was too taut or something like that. He gave me a couple of novacain shots, then snipped the ligament and sent me home with some tiny rubber bands to put over the two front teeth and pull them together. That was it. Gap gone in two days or so. Ask your dentist if that would work on your child.
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Old 01-06-2011, 10:12 AM
 
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Originally Posted by isisthea View Post
Yes I would. I don't find it attractive.
That's interesting. So you wouldn't leave it to your child to decide? Is there a hair color or other physical attribute that you don't find attractive that you'd have fixed as well?

Not trying to be snarky, just interested in how far people would take this kind of thing.
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