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Old 01-06-2011, 07:39 AM
 
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After reading the American Doll thread, where much ado was made regarding the gap in the doll's front teeth, I was wondering how many parents would get this "fixed" if their child had one.

I have one, and my mother had one, so it's quite likely my dd will have one too. I never thought it was a flaw, as such, but I'm wondering if it will be considered one these days, and whether we should consider it on the same level as other cosmetic issues fixed by braces. It's unlikely dd will need braces for any other issues, so this would be the only reason to go the orthodontic route. Do you think it's worth it?

Just for reference, I'm talking about a Madonna/Anna Paquin/Lauren Hutton size gap - not something that's likely to make her feel socially unacceptable.
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Old 01-06-2011, 07:42 AM
 
Location: maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
After reading the American Doll thread, where much ado was made regarding the gap in the doll's front teeth, I was wondering how many parents would get this "fixed" if their child had one.

I have one, and my mother had one, so it's quite likely my dd will have one too. I never thought it was a flaw, as such, but I'm wondering if it will be considered one these days, and whether we should consider it on the same level as other cosmetic issues fixed by braces. It's unlikely dd will need braces for any other issues, so this would be the only reason to go the orthodontic route. Do you think it's worth it?

Just for reference, I'm talking about a Madonna/Anna Paquin/Lauren Hutton size gap - not something that's likely to make her feel socially unacceptable.

If it becomes an issue with her then let her fix it when she has the money
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Old 01-06-2011, 07:44 AM
 
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I have a slight gap and have never thought of getting it fixed. My teeth are straight and white and I don't think it hurts my looks.

That said, if you child has other orthodontic issues and needs braces they would correct the gap along with the other problems.

Your son might not inherit the gap. My children haven't inherited mine and at this point it doesn't appear they'll need braces.
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Old 01-06-2011, 07:44 AM
 
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I personally like these kinds of "flaws." My parents couldn't afford braces, so I have a slightly crooked front tooth. My dentist has recently been pushing me to get braces, but I've had it all my life, so I don't even think about it. I'm 43, and my teeth are otherwise in really good condition (only 2 cavities ever!).

My oldest daughter has a slight gap too, and she asked me about it, I told her that people's bodies have all kinds of imperfections and that we aren't supposed to look like mannequins.

That being said, if it truly bothered my daughter, and we could afford braces (we can), I'd probably get it fixed. If it didn't bother her, I wouldn't worry about it. In our culture, which is obsessed with physical perfection, it probably will bother her at some point.
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Old 01-06-2011, 07:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by lucygirl951 View Post
I personally like these kinds of "flaws." My parents couldn't afford braces, so I have a slightly crooked front tooth. My dentist has recently been pushing me to get braces, but I've had it all my life, so I don't even think about it. I'm 43, and my teeth are otherwise in really good condition (only 2 cavities ever!).

My oldest daughter has a slight gap too, and she asked me about it, I told her that people's bodies have all kinds of imperfections and that we aren't supposed to look like mannequins.

That being said, if it truly bothered my daughter, and we could afford braces (we can), I'd probably get it fixed. If it didn't bother her, I wouldn't worry about it. In our culture, which is obsessed with physical perfection, it probably will bother her at some point.
I like mine too, though there were certain times during adolescence where I felt a little self conscious about it. Braces really weren't the norm when I grew up, so it wasn't even a consideration.

I mentioned to my mother in law when dd was a baby that she'll probably have a gap in her front teeth, and MIL said "oh that's ok, you can always get that fixed." I must admit I was a little taken aback by that.

I think a little imperfection sets people apart, and can turn somewhat ordinary looks into something special. I'm not fond of the over processed teeth look - where people's teeth are so perfect that they look like they're wearing dentures at 22. It looks weird to me.
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:17 AM
 
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No, I probably wouldn't put them through the whole process, which can be painful. And expensive!
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:18 AM
 
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I would never get my CHILD's teeth fixed (for just a gap braces are another story) but if my adult children were uncomfortable with it I would support them in thier decision to get it fixed on thier own dime.

It's not a financial matter for me but one of learning to accept ourselves, flaws and all. Everyone (okay MOST poeple, there some freaks of nature who are perfect) has small "flaws" and we need to learn to live with them and accept them and sometimes we may even learn to like them! I wouldn't even consider a gap a "flaw" it's more of a feature. It's not one that I personally find attractive but it's not a deformity by any stretch.

When I was 2 months old my savage beast of a cousin crawled into my crib and scratched the he77 out of my face, when I first realized the scars were there I must have been 6 or 7 my mom told me I could get them removed when I was a teenager if I wanted. After consulting with a plastic surgeon in my teens I decided the process was too much for me at the time (multiple surgries and acid peels would be needed) so I held off, now I am almost thirty I have the scars there and probably always will because they make me, ME. I see no need to "fix" what isn't broken.
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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I had a gap and asked my parents to get me braces when I was a teenager. Most of my friends had braces anyway. They said it was part of my personality and wouldn't do it.

I was very unhappy about it and embarrassed about it. Some friends with braces gave me those little rubber bands which I wore to help some. When I was married with kids I found out I did not have to live with it and had some bonding done. I'm so glad I did as I feel it improved my smile so much.

I'm very aware of people's teeth and I guess too critical. Your smile is your best asset and if you are embarrassed about it, that can cause alot of social anxiety. I got braces for my oldest DD as she really needed them. DS not so much. he has beautiful teeth. I'll definitely get braces for one of the 8 year olds and possibly for the other one. We have apts next week.

BTW 25 years ago we got plastic surgery for our 5 year old son because he had ears which flapped in the wind. My husband kept tellling me his head would grow into his ears when he was a baby but it never happened. It was considered a birth defect and our insurance covered the operation. I doubt that would happen today.
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
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When your daughter gets older, if she's horribly unhappy, and you can afford them, they can fix that gap with braces.

I'm with you Finster, about the "denture" look you see everywhere these days. My hat goes off to all of the actors who've never fallen for that processed perfection look. Sometimes those imperfections are what make a person look unique/exotic/beautiful. Get those teeth fixed and they pretty much look like everyone else. Look at Ann Heigel (sp?). I'm blown away at some of the actors/actresses who have had their teeth laminated or capped. For some of them, it looks so wrong! It can change so many things about them. Oh sure, you've got this bright white, glowing smile.....but for some, it changes the way they talk. It's like it builds up the front teeth so much that they're almost (bucked)!

As for the gap being hereditary......it's funny how it works! Neither my hubby or I have a gap in our teeth. We were blessed with straight teeth. However, most of he people in his family have the "gap". Only my oldest son has a gap between his teeth. All of the others have perfectly straight teeth sans the gap! By the way, we never got the gap fixed, as he didn't have a problem with it. If it would have been a huge issue, we certainly would have had it fixed.
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:29 AM
 
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Probably not. Especially if it was for just cosmetic reasons. I am getting sick of the "One Way Beauty" thing we have going on in society in the last 20 years or so.

Lauren Hutton to Mango – Fashionista: Fashion Industry News, Designers, Runway Shows, Style Advice
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