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Old 02-04-2011, 02:49 PM
 
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My son is in 5th grade and it isn't unusual to see girls wearing makeup in school. We live in Oregon, and he attends a public elementary school. There is a big change in how the kids present themselves between 4th and 5th grades, we've noticed. There are a few girls who wear knee-high boots with heels and today there was a girl wearing a red trench coat and tights that looked like fishnet stockings. When I walked into the office, two of the office ladies and a teacher were commenting on the girls outfit, wondering if it was appropriate for school and if the mother should be called. I felt really sad for her. And for the school, as if the schools don't have enough to worry about...
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Old 02-04-2011, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Liberal Coast
4,271 posts, read 4,988,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
Will she? And why's that? How old were you when you were sneaking it on at school? Why did you want to wear it at school at that age? I'm interested in what motivated you to put makeup on at whatever prepubescent age you were at the time.

Honestly, I'd like to know. What reason does an 8-12 year old have for wearing makeup on a regular basis?
Hehe. She obviously didn't go to my school. Even in the late 90's, if you were wearing makeup at my elementary school you were made to take it off.
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Old 02-06-2011, 09:07 AM
 
53 posts, read 41,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
What on earth are we telling our prepubescent girls by having this stuff available and marketed to them as desirable? At that age, they are truly beautiful just as they are and why are we planting the seed that their appearance is not good enough without it? Not good enough for whom?

What are everybody's thoughts on this?
The example I set for my daughters was not to wear make-up myself. They never asked to wear make-up, not even in high school. They understand that the natural face is more beautiful than the most made up one. I point out the difference between the face we are used to seeing made up, without make-up. It isn't difficult at all for a child to see how absolutely old looking a face gets after make-up is applied for a number of years. It isn't a natural aging at all.

If the mother doesn't think she is beautiful without make-up, the daughter will think the same.

In the end, it's the parent's responsibility to buy or not to buy. It shouldn't make any difference what stores carry.

Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
This is a perfect time and situation to be teaching our children about marketing and advertising. I have been teaching my 8 year old daughters about product placement in grocery stores, target audiences for TV commercials and print advertisements.

The other day they decided they wanted some product they had seen advertised on one of their kiddie websites.
It turned into a great discussion of how to analyze what we read and how to avoid persuasion.

I know profit is the name of the game but we should use products like this to teach good consumerism. Of course no girl that age NEEDS makeup but believe me somebody will buy it. We need to think for ourselves and teach our children at an early age to do the same thing.


Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
I'm not just implying it. Of course it's different. This stuff is being marketed as a beauty regimen for prepubescent girls. This is real makeup and the implication from the company that makes it is that little girls NEED the makeup in order to IMPROVE their appearance. There's very little subtlety about it. They want to make it a lifestyle choice - not just for playing dressup.

I personally think it's socially irresponsible of Walmart and this company to try and start this trend. Because that's what they're doing. If you think this all an innocent attempt to improve the quality of products that little girls play with at home then I don't think you're giving their marketing dept enough credit.

As for the morality issue, I think it's like this - on one hand we say "don't you dare have sex before you're 18 or married, or whatever" but at 8/9/10 we're saying "here - here's a line of makeup that serves no other real purpose but to start you off as a sexual being before you've even hit puberty - and besides that, women and girls alike look dreadful without makeup, so you'd better get used to wearing it."

This goes beyond parents individually saying yes or no. I think it speaks volumes about the expectations we have of the girls in our society. In other words, here's one more way of telling them their looks matter above all else.
Parents have to have a backbone while raising kids. In our house, the parent carries the weight, not the kids. If we say no, we mean no. I don't care what is advertised, or how it's advertised.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
I think it's terribly harming to young girls' self esteem to basically tell them they NEED makeup at that age.
Sorry, but Walmart does NOT make choices for me and my family. Walmart does NOT decide how my daughters feel about themselves.
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Old 02-06-2011, 09:36 AM
 
Location: somewhere
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Obviously someone felt like there was a market for this, hence the reason Walmart came out with it. Just because a store carries something, doesn't mean parents have to buy it. If a parent does not want their tweens wearing makeup then you explain to them why it is not a good idea and then don't allow it.
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Old 02-06-2011, 09:58 AM
 
Location: somewhere
4,264 posts, read 7,935,903 times
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Originally Posted by ekt View Post
I hate it when people say "pick your battles". I think having an 8 year old in make up is definately a battle worth "picking". As the mother of three adult daughters I can say that anyone i knew that had that philosophy now have adult daughters with multiple children by multiple men or are just totally nasty.

I dont think it is for Walmart to decide when my daughter wears make up or anyone else for that matter. We are putting too much pressure on girls to be women when they are simply little girls who should be enjoying their childhood. They will be grown soon enough. Play a little in mommy's make up? Sure but that is for home only. I remember putting on my moms super high pointy heeled shoes and wobbling down the stairs in them. It was fun but its not like she sent me off to school in them at the age of 5.

Let the girls be kids while they can. Its like the ratings they put on movies. Who says that someone in Hollywood should decide that at age 13 it is ok for my child to watch shows with partial nudity? Oh well.....as far as the make up goes......just another way for Walmart to rake in some more money.
When did Walmart make the decision for your daughter to wear makeup? Walmart is not making the decision for anyone, they saw a demand for this market and it will now be available. And before to long all the other chain stores will offer something like this, if Walmart is successful in it's sales.

When did parents lose their backbone and think someone else had the right to make the decisions about what was right for their children or their families? When did parents decide that they couldn't tell their children NO? Seriously people if you don't want your tween daughter to wear makeup then don't buy it. If enough parents feel the same way you do and don't buy it, then Walmart and whoever else decides to sell a product like this will be forced to stop carrying the product. That is one of the good things about living in America, when we go to the store we can actually chose what we do or don't want to buy as well as what store we chose to use.

And Walmart is a business just like any other business and their bottom line is the ability to make a profit.
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Old 02-06-2011, 12:09 PM
 
47,576 posts, read 58,745,541 times
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It's up to the parents but also the schools should have rules when it comes to dress and makeup.

Some parents might not think it's a big deal for a little girl to wear some tinted lip gloss or candy flavored lip gloss - but it depends a lot on why. Kids grow up too fast as it is - they should be encouraged to enjoy childhood as long as possible. However - some parents allow their daughters to wear make-up at age 12 or 13 - whenever they feel like it but are quite strict otherwise. The girl might wear make-up but isn't dating for 4 or 5 more years.
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Old 02-06-2011, 04:22 PM
 
9,056 posts, read 6,730,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jakija9311 View Post
The example I set for my daughters was not to wear make-up myself. They never asked to wear make-up, not even in high school. They understand that the natural face is more beautiful than the most made up one. I point out the difference between the face we are used to seeing made up, without make-up. It isn't difficult at all for a child to see how absolutely old looking a face gets after make-up is applied for a number of years. It isn't a natural aging at all.

If the mother doesn't think she is beautiful without make-up, the daughter will think the same.

In the end, it's the parent's responsibility to buy or not to buy. It shouldn't make any difference what stores carry.
Of course it's the parent's responsibility. I totally agree that how one sees oneself influences the way your daughter will see themselves, as well. But if you don't think it makes a difference what the biggest, and most mainstream, retailer in the country carries, and markets to kids - then I think you're being a tad naive.

When I said "what are we telling our prepubescent daughters" I meant our daughters as a society, as a whole - not just your particular daughters individually.

There are a lot of women who are going to pass on their insecurities to their daughters. I'm glad you're not one of them. That's often not going to be the case. Walmart (I'm picking on them because they're the ones starting it) is trying to cash in on this and get the little girls started early on their "beauty" regime. They have a right to make a profit. I don't have to like the way they're doing it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jakija9311 View Post
Parents have to have a backbone while raising kids. In our house, the parent carries the weight, not the kids. If we say no, we mean no. I don't care what is advertised, or how it's advertised.
You may not. Good. The reality is, that girls as a group most likely will. They don't exist in a bubble, inside the home. There are already girls that don't even menstruate yet that think they're too fat, and are starving themselves. This is playing into that mentality, IMO. Tween girls are being more aggressively marketed to than they have been at any other time.

I believe your girls may have missed out on this onslaught, being grown, and your youngest daughter is 16 now, IIRC? I'm concerned about how the new generation of kids are being manipulated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jakija9311 View Post
Sorry, but Walmart does NOT make choices for me and my family. Walmart does NOT decide how my daughters feel about themselves.
Nor mine. I hope all the little girls and their parents feel this way. I have a feeling they don't. I'm looking at this in the context of a bigger picture.

There are marketing teams soley aimed at tweens. They're the new 18-34 demo in the eyes of marketers.

Here's one way that marketing companies are used to influence tween girls -

Quote:
Through a unique research and marketing tool aptly dubbed Slumber-Party-In-A-Box, G.I.A. strategically dispatches one of its 40,000 or so "secret agents"--girls as young as 7 years old who are prequalified as "influencers." The mission: To gather 10 to 12 of their closest friends and host a slumber party where they and their friends will put to the test a box of never-before-seen products supplied by a manufacturer looking to succeed in the female youth market. There are roughly 500 such parties held at a time, reaching a minimum of 6,000 girls.
G.I.A. takes marketing behind closed slumber party doors | Drug Store News | Find Articles at BNET

I think most parents are going to be pretty ignorant about the lengths companies will go to to get their products in the hands of their tweens.

Listen, I hope I'm wrong. Forewarned is forearmed, is how I look at it.
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Old 02-06-2011, 07:45 PM
 
1,302 posts, read 1,530,649 times
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I don't wear makeup because I am insecure. I like being a girl. I like wearing makeup just like I like doing my hair, wearing dresses and fabulous way too expensive shoes.

I take care of my skin just like I take care of my body and eat healthy and work out.

In fact, I think I look pretty darn awesome for a woman in her 40s with 2 grown sons. It is not insecurity, it is very much enjoying being a girl.

Last edited by Green Irish Eyes; 02-06-2011 at 07:48 PM.. Reason: If you think a post is insulting, please report it.
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