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Old 01-31-2011, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Geneva, IL
12,976 posts, read 11,796,877 times
Reputation: 14677

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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
This is the issue that some people aren't getting: it's NOT toy makeup. It's real makeup with a cleansing and exfoliating product in the line that's meant to be used everyday. Their marketing strategy is to get tween girls to wear makeup and buy cleansing/routine beauty products much like adult women do. On a regular basis. The problem IS in the marketing, not just the makeup.

I think it's terribly harming to young girls' self esteem to basically tell them they NEED makeup at that age.

I have a nearly four year old girl, and one of my strategies for wearing makeup would be simply that it's for older girls/women and that if she wants to at 10/11 (not 8 I hope - jeez 8?!!) that she'd be too young and that it's not appropriate for her age.

However, now that there's going to be a full on makeup line for girls THAT AGE at the biggest retailer in the country how much water is that argument going to hold? If people think this is not going to influence them and make it sooo much harder to stop little girls wanting to grow up too soon then I think they are fooling themselves. Of course I will still say no but really - a lot of people won't and now we'll have little girls having to "put on their face" before they leave the house.

It's a horrible step in the wrong direction, IMO.
I do get exactly what this product is, and I don't agree with the message it sends.

There's a fine line between playing around with makeup, and "wearing" it. All the 8 year-olds I know play around with it. Some wear lipstick or lip gloss out. Is that playing around or "wearing" it? Hell, I don't know. There are skin care lines already available for kids, there is makeup for kids, I think the kicker is that it's Walmart. If one is against it on priciple, then surely one should be against all of these products? Does that even make sense? It's a bit of a slippery slope I think. I know plenty of moms who make their young kids up before going out, almost like a live doll. I think it's awful that some moms want their girls to grow up so quickly, and I'm trying to keep mine innocent.
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Old 01-31-2011, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Rock Springs WY
400 posts, read 769,768 times
Reputation: 248
I think this is great! My daughter has loved putting makeup on since she was 2 and I hate buying that crap made in china, who knows what's in that stuff! She isn't allowed to wear it out of the house however. I would love to have a lighter line for her to play with here at home, considering the dark colors in the other kits and her likeness to wear the black eyeshadow! lol
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Old 01-31-2011, 01:21 PM
 
623 posts, read 1,389,683 times
Reputation: 712
Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
This is the issue that some people aren't getting: it's NOT toy makeup. It's real makeup with a cleansing and exfoliating product in the line that's meant to be used everyday. Their marketing strategy is to get tween girls to wear makeup and buy cleansing/routine beauty products much like adult women do. On a regular basis. The problem IS in the marketing, not just the makeup.

I think it's terribly harming to young girls' self esteem to basically tell them they NEED makeup at that age.

I have a nearly four year old girl, and one of my strategies for wearing makeup would be simply that it's for older girls/women and that if she wants to at 10/11 (not 8 I hope - jeez 8?!!) that she'd be too young and that it's not appropriate for her age.

However, now that there's going to be a full on makeup line for girls THAT AGE at the biggest retailer in the country how much water is that argument going to hold? If people think this is not going to influence them and make it sooo much harder to stop little girls wanting to grow up too soon then I think they are fooling themselves. Of course I will still say no but really - a lot of people won't and now we'll have little girls having to "put on their face" before they leave the house.

It's a horrible step in the wrong direction, IMO.
I think a lot of us understand what it is. We just don't agree about all the stuff you are saying. If that's what is says to you. Fine.... I for one don't have an issue with it.

You have made your case post after post that you don't think it is not right. Don't ask what other people think from now on. Ask "who else thinks exactly like I do" That will be a post that slides right to the bottom.
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Old 01-31-2011, 01:43 PM
 
11,614 posts, read 19,724,832 times
Reputation: 12046
Quote:
Originally Posted by lucygirl951 View Post
Makeup is not immoral (nor did I say it was).
What you wrote is:

Quote:
Originally Posted by lucygirl951 View Post
Walmart's marketing choices are interesting to me. The company takes a strong stand on music and movies, but it doesn't see the moral connection when it comes to encouraging young girls to pose as older than they are. And that, IMO, is what make-up at an early age does.
So you did equate makeup for young girls to immorality. I didn't make it up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lucygirl951 View Post
Marketing something that is sexualizing to young girls is questionable, morally. And if you don't think that marketing affects children, you're naive.
I agree that sexualizing young girls is morally questionable but I do not agree that makeup is necessarily sexualizing young girls. I don't think that little girls wanting to look pretty automatically means they want to look sexy. If you ask the girls they will tell you they want to look pretty.

Where did I say that marketing does not affect children? YOU said that.
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Old 01-31-2011, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Northern California
970 posts, read 1,745,801 times
Reputation: 1390
I actually did some internet searching to read the article(s) for myself. This is nothing new; apparently these products are supposed to replace the older Mary Kate/Ashley stuff that Walmart was already selling, made for the same market.

I still don't see anything wrong with buying makeup for your kids to play with. It doesn't matter why Walmart markets the makeup, you are still going to have responsible and irresponsible parents. Some parents won't buy the stuff at all. Some parents will buy the stuff and tell the children that skin care is important, they should wear makeup to attract other people, all people need makeup, etc. Some parents will buy the stuff and let the kids play dress up at home while teaching them that makeup is a fun thing, not something you HAVE to have in order to be pretty.
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Old 01-31-2011, 02:18 PM
 
5,945 posts, read 12,726,291 times
Reputation: 6677
I think this is just yet another example of "cradle to the grave" marketing.

Hook'em when they are young, and hopefully they will stay dedicated customers loyal to that brand for life.

As an adult, I know that McDonald's is not healthy, wholesome food. But because I have fond memorie of eating there and playing there and collecting the toys when I was a young girl, my brain associates McDonald's with good comforting things. So, as an adult, even knowing what I do, I have to fight urges sometimes to spend my money there. Cradle to the grave.

That's what they want to happen. That's good marketing. Hook these young girls when they are young, and hopefully they will be customers for life.

I think it's horrible, selling makeup to such young girls, but it's not like it's a new concept and it's not like there aren't tons of other things out there like it already. I really get grossed out when I see things like bikini's for baby girls or young girls, or strapless tube tops for toddlers and young girls. It's really gross and trashy, but that's evidently where we're at at a society. Women think they have come a long way, but look around you. It's still about dressing to please men and doing things to our bodies that we think men will find attractive.

Nothing will change for the better as long as people still shop at those places and buy those things.
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Old 01-31-2011, 10:11 PM
 
3,422 posts, read 9,439,775 times
Reputation: 1957
Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
I was looking at some makeup at Target (in the cosmetics department) not too long ago that wasn't a "Hannah Montana" product by it was obiously being marketed to this age group. There's a market out there. I'm sure Walmart and Target and Disney and everybody else put mega bucks into researching this and decided they're going to make bucks.

Cheerleading, dance, gymnastics, theater, music groups/lessons is big business where I live. (Maybe it is elsewhere and I just never noticed.) And all of the 8-year olds participating wear more makeup than I do. My guess is the stuff will fly off the shelves here. (I am happy to report the 8-year olds aren't wearing it to school. But after school all the little cheerleaders look like miniature adults.)
I can see the girls wearing "stage makeup" for competitions or whatever, but they go put it on after school? Wow.

I haven't seen the line of products yet but if it truly does have makeup in it, I wish they would have just stuck to the skincare part of the line up. You know, foaming cleanser, lip balm, moisturizer, that kind of stuff. My 8 yr old daughter loves to play with that toy lip gloss stuff with the sparkles in it but has not asked to wear real makeup. I wear very little makeup so maybe that is why. I remember in middle school we were not allowed to wear makeup or nail polish to school, so in 8th grade my friends and I would experiment with cover girl cosmetics at each others houses, and paint our toenails.
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Old 01-31-2011, 10:21 PM
 
3,422 posts, read 9,439,775 times
Reputation: 1957
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zimbochick View Post
Yes, but you have absolutely no control over this except by using or not using your buying power. I agree that girls are being preened into adulthood way too early. My daughter really loves makeup, but it's more a dress-up thing for her. She is very naive and for her fashion choices are part of her fantasy still. She does not fashion herself after the skimpy-clothes brigade, thank goodness. And I say again it is a "pick your battles topic". There are girls in my daughter's 2nd grade class who wear bras, shave their underarms, get their hair colored, treat facial hair. Now my daughter has no clue about any of these things, and no knowledge either, so it has to be mothers who are pushing these issues. I'd much rather my daughter wear her gaudy makeup from time to time than have to deal with any of those other issues. And there are companies that manufacture lingerie for young kids, there have been threads posted here before, and it's sickening to me, although some of the little girls underwear is pretty provocative as it is.
Wow I am so out of the loop. Colored hair, etc.. in 2nd grade is amazing to me. My daughter is in 3rd. She has always worn those cotton briefs style underwear. Recently she saw a pack of underwear at the store that was bikini style (you know, just a slight rise in the fabric at the sides instead of that full brief coverage) and liked the colors and style and I got it, and her dad was very uncomfortable with it!

I need to keep my eyes open. They grow up so fast.
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Old 02-01-2011, 12:58 AM
 
Location: Australia
1,492 posts, read 2,655,990 times
Reputation: 1693
(some) Girls enjoy this stuff. Sounds good to me.
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Old 02-01-2011, 05:48 AM
 
6,124 posts, read 5,153,831 times
Reputation: 8352
At our house, we did the "makeover" thing at slumber parties when my daughter was in Jr. High - I did the girls' makeup and hair and made them look "glamorous". They were 13 or 14 at the time, and considered it very "daring" - most of my daughter's friends were forbidden to wear makeup until they were 15 or 16. I have to admit, I made them look very grownup. They weren't allowed to leave the house looking like that, though. I think 8 to 12 is too young, even for "pretend" - I think they are allowed to grow up too fast and are going to end up forced into situations they don't have the maturity to handle.
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